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But these are closed; the Ten, the Avogadori, And in thy best maturity of mind
The Giunta, and the chief men of the Forty, A madness of the heart shall seize upon thee;
Alone will be beholders of thy doom,

Passion shall tear thee when all passions cease And they are ready to attend the Doge.

In other men, or mellow into virtues ;
Doge. The Doge!

And majesty, which decks all other heads,
Ben. Yes, Doge, thou hast lived and thou shalt die Shall crown to leave thee headless; honors shall
A sovereign; till the moment which precedes But prove to thee the heralds of destruction,
The seperation of that head and trunk,

And hoary hairs of shame, and both of death, That ducal crown and head shall be united. But not such death as fits an aged man.” Thou hast forgot thy dignity in deigning

Thus saying he pass'd on.—That hour is come. To plot with petty traitors; not so we,

Ang. And with this warning couldst thou notave Who in the very punishment acknowledge

striven The prince. Thy vile accoinplices have died To avert the fatal moment, and atone The dog's death, and the wolf's; but thou shalt fall By penitence for that which thou hadst done? As falls the lion by the hunters, girt

Doge. I own the words went to my heart, so much By those who feel a proud compassion for thec, That I remember'd them amid the maze And mourn even the inevitable death

Of life, as if they form'd a spectral voice, Provoked by thy wild wrath, and regal fierceness. Which shook me in a supernatural dream; Now we remit thee to thy preparation :

And I repented ; but 'twas not for me Let it be brief, and we ourselves will be

To pull in resolution : what must be Thy guides unto the place where first we were I could not change, and would nor fear.--Nay more, United to thee as thy subjects, and

Thou canst not have forgot, what all remember, Thy senate; and must now be parted from thee That on my day of landing here as Doge, As such for ever, on the self-samne spot.

On my return from Rome, a mist of such Guards! form the Doze's escort to his chamber. Unwonted density went on before

[Excunt. The bucentaur like the columnal cloud

Which usher'd Israel out of Egypt, till
SCENE II.

The pilot was misled, and disembark'd us

Between the pillars of Saint Mark's, where 'tis The Doge's 1partment.

The custom of the state to put to death

Its criminals, instead of touching at
The DogE as Prisoner, and the DưCHESS attending The Riva bella Paglia, as the wont is,
him.

So that all Venice shudder'd at the omen,
Doge. Now, that the priest is gone, 'twere useless Ang. Ah ! little boots it now to recollect

Such things.
To linger out the miserable minutes;

Doge. And yet I find a comfort in But onc pang more, the pang of parting from thee, ! The thought that these things are the work of Fate; And I will leave the few last grains of sand, For I would rather yield to gods than men, Which yet remain of the accorded hour,

Or cling to any creed of destiny, Still falling-I have done with Time.

Rather than deem these mortals, most of whom Ang.

Alas!

I know to be as worthless as the dust, And I have been the cause, the wconscious cause ; And weak as worthless, more than instruments And for this funeral marriage, this black union, Of an o’erruling power ; they in themselves Which thou, compliant with my father's wish, Were all incapable--they could not be Didst promise at his death, thou hast seal'd thine Victors of him who oft had conquer'd for them! own.

Ang. Employ the minutes left in aspirations Doge. Not so : there was that in my spirit ever Of a more healing nature, and in peace Which shaped out for itself some great reverse: Even with these wretches take thy flight to Heaven. The marrel is, it came not until now

Doge. I am at peace : the peace of certainty And yet it was foretold me.

That a sure hour will come, when their sons' sons, Ang.

How foretold you ? And this proud city, and these azure waters, Dogo. Long years ago--so long, they are a doubt And all which makes them eminent and bright, In memory, and yet they live in annals:

Shall be a desolation, and a curse, When I was in my youth and serv'd the senate A hissing and a scoff unto the nations, And signory as podesta and captain

A Carthage, and a Tyre, an Ocean Babel ! Of the town of Treviso, on a day

Ang. Speak not thus now; the surge of passion Of festival, the sluggish bishop who

still Convey'd the Host aroused my rash young anger, Sweeps o'er thee to the last; thou dost deceive By strange delay, and arrogant reply

Thyself, and canst not injure them--be calmer. To my reproof! I raised my hand and smote him Doge. I stand within eternity, and see Until he reel'd beneath his holy burden;

Into eternity, and I beholdAnd as he rose from earth again, he raised

Ay, palpable as I see thy sweet face His tremulous hands in pious wrath towards heaven. For the last time-the days which I denounce Thence pointing to the Host, which had fallen from Unto all time against these wave-girt walls, him,

And they who are indwellers. He turn’d to me, and said, “ The hour will come į Guard, (coming forward.) Doge of Venice When he thou hast o’erthrown shall o’erthrow thee: The Ten are in attendance on your highness. The glory shall depart from out thy house,

Doge. Then farewell, Angiolina !-one embracena The wisdom shall be shaken from thy soul, Forgive the old man who hath been to thee

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A fond but fatal husband-love my memory

To utter or to do? I would not ask so much for me still living,

Doge.

May I speak: But thou canst judge of me more kindly now,

Ben.

Thou may’st; Seeing my evil feelings are at rest.

But recollect the people are without,
Besides, of all the fruit of these long years, Beyond the compass of the human voice.
Glory, and wealth, and power, and fame, and name, Doge. I speak to Time and to Eternity,
Which generally leave some flowers to bloom Of which I grow a portion, not to man.
Even o'er the grave, I have nothing left, not even Ye elements ! in which to be resolved,
A little love, or friendship, or esteem,

I hasten, let my voice be as a spirit
No not enough to extract an epitaph

Upon you! Ye blue waves! which bore my banner From ostentatious kinsmen; in one hour

Ye winds ! which flutter'd o’er as if you loved it, I have uprooted all my former life,

And fill'd my swelling sails as they were wafted And outlived every thing, except thy heart, To many a triumph! Thou, my native earth, The pure, the good, the gentle, which will oft Which I have bled for, and thou foreign earth, With unimpair'd but not a clamorous grief Which drank this willing blood from many a wound! Still keep- thou turn'st so pale!--Alas! she faints, Ye stones, in which my gore will not sink, but She hath no breath, no pulse !-Guards lend your Reek up to Heaven ! Ye skies, which will receive it! aida

Thou sun! which shinest on these things, and Thou ! I cannot leave her thus, and yet ’tis better, Who kindlest and who quenchest suns !-Attest! Since every lifeless moment spares a pang.

I am not innocent-but are these guiltless ? When she shakes off this temporary death, I perish, but not unavenged; far ages I shall be with the Eternal.-Call her women Float up from the abyss of time to be, One look !-how cold her hand !-as cold as mine And show these eyes, before they close, the doom Shall be ere she recovers.—Gently tend her, Of this proud city, and I leave my curse And take my last thanks--I am ready now. On her and liers for ever !-Yes, the hours

[The Attendants of ANGIOLINA enter and sur-Are silently engendering of the day,

round their mistress, who has fainted.- When she, who built ’gainst Attila a bulwark,
Exeunt the DOGE, Guards, &c., &c.

Shall yield, and bloodlessly and basely yield
Unto a bastard Attila, without

Shedding so much blood in her last defence
SCENE III.

As these old veins, oft draind in shielding her, The Court of the Ducal Palace: the outer gates are Shall pour in sacrifice.-She shall be bought shut against the people. The DOGE enters in his And sold, and be an appanage to those ducal robes, in procession with the Council of Ten Who shall despise her !-She shall stoop to be and other Patricians, attended by the Guards till A province for an empire, petty town they arrive at the top of the Giant's Staircase,'' | In lieu of capitol, with slaves for senates, (where the Doges took the oaths ;) the Exccutioner | Beggars for nobles, panders for a people ! 10 is stationed there with his sword.-On arriving, a Then when the Hebrew's in thy palaces, 11 Chief of the Ten takes off the ducal cap from the The Hun in thy high places, and the Greek Doge's head.

Walks o'er thy mart, and smiles on it for his !

When thy patricians beg their bitter bread
Doge. So now the Doge is nothing, and at last In narrow streets, and in their shameful need
I am again Marino Faliero :

Make their nobility a plea for pity!
'Tis well to be so, though but for a moment. Then, when the few who still retain a wreck
Here was I crown'd, and here, bear witness, Heaven! Of their great fathers heritage shall fawn
With how much more contentment I resign

Round a barbarian Vice of Kings' Vicegerent, That shining mockery, the ducal bauble,

Even in the palace where they sway'd as sovereigns, Than I received the fatal ornament.

Even in the palace where they slew their sovereign, One of the Ten. Thou tremblest, Faliero ! Proud of some name they have disgraced, or sprung Doge.

'Tis with age, then." From an adultress boastful of her guilt Ben. Faliero ! hast thou aught further to com- With some large gondolier or foreign soldier, mend,

Shall bear about their bastardy in triumph Compatible with justice, to the senate?

To the third spurious generation ;-when Doge. I would coinmend my nephew to their Thy sons are in the lowest scale of being, mercy,

Slaves turn'd o'er to the vanquish'd by the victors, My consort to their justice; for methinks

Despised by cowards for greater cowardice, My death, and such a death, might settle all And scorn'd even by the vicious for such vices Between the state and me.

As in the monstrous grasp of their conception Benz.

They shall be cared for; Defy all. codes to image or to name them; Even notwithstanding thine unheard-of crime. Then, when of Cyprus, now thy subject kingdom,

Doge. Unheard-of! ay, there's not a history All thine inheritance shall be her shame But shows a thousand crown'd conspirators Entail'd on thy less virtuous daughters, grown Against the people ; but to set them free

A wider proverb for worse prostitution ;-
One sovereign only died, and one is dying. When all the ills of conquer'd states shall cling thee,

Ben. And who were they who fell in such a cause ? Vice without splendor, sin without relief
Doge. The King of Sparta, and the Doge of Even from the gloss of love to smooth it o'er,
Venice-

But in its stead coarse lusts of habitude,
Agis and Faliero !

Prurient yet passionless, cold studied lewdness, Bern Hast thou more

Depraving nature's frailty to an art ;

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.

Wnen these and more are heavy on thee, when He raises his keen eyes to heaven ; I see
Smiles without mirth, and pastimes without pleasure, Them glitter, and his lips move-Hush! hush !--no,
Youth without honor, age without respect,

'Twas but a murmur-Curse upon the distance !
Meanness and weakness, and a sense of wo His words are inarticulate, but the voice
'Gainst which thou wilt not strive, and dar'st not Swells up like mutter'd thunder ; would we could
murmur,

But gather a sole sentence!
Have made thee last and worst of peopled deserts, Second "it. Hush! we perhaps may catch the
Then, in the last gasp of thine agony,

sound. Amidst thy many murders, think of mine!

First Cit.

'Tis vain, Thou den of drunkards with the blood of princes! 12 I cannot hear him.--How his huary hair Gehenna of the waters! thou sea Sodom !

Streams on the wind like foam upon the wave! Thus I devote thee to the infernal gods!

Now-now--he kneels-and now they form a circle Thee and thy serpent seed!

Round him, and all is hidden-but I see [Here the Doge turns, and addresses the Executioneer. The lifted sword in air— Ah! Hark! it falls ! Slave, do thine office!

[The people murmur Strike as I struck the foe! Strike as I would

Third Cit. Then they have murder'd him who
Have struck those tyrants! Strike deep as my curse! | would have freed us.
Strikemand but once!

Fourth Cit. He was a kind man to the commons [The Doge throws himself upon his knees, and

ever. as the Executioner raises his sword, the scene Fifth Cit. Wisely they did to keep their portals closes.

barr'd.

Would we had known the work they were preparing
SCENE IV.

Ere we were summon'd here, we would have brought
The Piazza and Piazzetta of Saint Mark's.--The

7. _'T Weapons and forced them! People in crowds gathered round the gratel gates

Sixth Cit.

Are you sure he's dead ? of the Ducal Palace, which are shut.

First Cit. I saw the sword fall-Lo! what have

we here? First Citizen. I have gain’d the gate, and can discern the Ten,

"Enter on the Balcony of the Palace which fronts Robed in their gowns of state. ranged round thel Saint Mark's Place, a CHIEF OF THE TEN,13 with Doge.

a bloody sword. He waves it thrice before the Second Cit. I cannot reach thee with mine utmost! People, and exclaims, effort.

“ Justice hath dealt upon the mighty Traitor!” How is it ? let us hear at least, since sight

[The gates are opened; the populace rush in Is thus prohibited unto the people,

towards the Giants Staircase,where the Except the occupiers of those bars.

execution has taken place. The foremost of First Cit. One has approach'd the Doge, and now them exclaims to those behind, they strip

The gory head rolls down the “Giants' Steps !The ducal bonnet from his head-and now

[The curtain falls.

NOTES TO MARINO FALIERO.

U

I smote the tardy bishop at Treviso.

Page 283, line 120. An historical fact. See Marin Sanuto's Lives of| the Doges.

An historical fact.

4.
Within our palace precincts at San Polo.

Page 301, line 62.
The Doge's private family palace.

2.

A gondola with one oar only.
Page 286, line 46.

Signor of the Night.A gondola is not like a common boat, but is as

Page 303, line 17. sasily rowed with one oar as with two, (though of ..

"I Signori di Notte" held an important charge course not so swiftly,) and often is so from motives in the old Republic.

6. of privacy; and (since the decay of Venice) of economy.

Festal Thursday.

Page 305, line 26.
They think themselves | “Giovedi Grasso,fat or greasy Thursday,"
Engaged in secret to the Signory.

which I cannot literally translate in the text, was
Page 294. lines 7 and 8. the day.

THESE!! few individuals can conceive, and none Guards ! let their mouthis be gaasid, even in the act. could describe the actual state into which the more works 36 line 37than infernal tyranny of Austria has plunged this

unhappy city. Historical fact. See Sanuto, in the Appendix to this tragedy.

11. 8.

Then when the llebreu's in thy palaces. Say, conscript fathers, shall she be admitted ?

Page 310, line 87. Page 396, line 128. The chief palces on the Brenta now belong to The Venetian senate took the same title as the

the Jews; who in the earlier times of the republic

We were only allowed to inhabit Mestri, and not to enRoman, of “Conscript Fathers.”

ter the city of Venice. The whole commerce is in the hands of the Jews and Greeks, and the Huns

form the garrison. 'Tis with age, then.

12. Page 310, line 33.

Thou den of drunkards with the blood of princcs. This was the actual reply of Bailli, maire of Paris, to a Frenchman who made him the same re

Page 311, line 9. proach on his way to execution, in the earliest part! Of the first fifty Doges, fire abdicated-five were of their revolution. I find in reading over, (since banished with their eyes put out-five were vaSSAthe completion of this tragedy,) for the first tiine CRED-—and nine deposed; so that nineteen out of these six years, “ Venice Preserved," a similar re- fifty lost the throne by violence, besides two who ply on a different occasion by Renault, and other fell in battle: this occurred long previous to the coincidences arising from the subject. I need reign of Marino Faliero. One of his more immehardly remind the gentlest reader, tắat such coin- diate predecessors, Andrea Dandolo, died of rexacidences must be accidental, from the very facility tion. Marino Faliero himself perished as related. of their detection by reference to so popular a play Among his successors, Foscari, after seeing his on the stage and in the closet as Otway's chef- son repeatedly tortured and banished, was deposed, d'æuvre.

and died of breaking a blood vessel, on hearing 10.

the bell of Saint Mark's toll for the election of his

successor. Morosini was impeached for the loss of Beggars for robles, panders for a people! Candia ; but this was previous to his dukedom, dur

Page 310, line 86. ing which lie conquered the Morea, and was styled Should the dramatic picture seein harshi, let the the Peloponnesian. Faliero might truly say “ Thou reader look to the historical, of the period prophe

den of drunkards with the blood of princes!sied, or rather of the few years preceding that period. Voltaire calculated their ó nostre benemerite

13. Meretrici” at 12,000 of regulars, without including volunteers and local militia, on what authority

Chief of the Ten. I know not; but it is perhaps the only part of the

Page 311, line 47. population not decreased. Venice once contained “Un Capo de' Dicci” are the words of Sanuto's 200,000 inhabitants, there are now about 90,000, and Chronicle.

APPENDIX TO MARINO FALIERO.

je due Capi de' Quaranta. E che osservino la forma

del suo Capitolare. E che Messer lo Doge si metta MCCCLIV.

nella miglior parte, quando i giudici tra loro non

fossero d'accordo. E ch' egli non possa far renMARINO FALIERO DOGE XLIX. dere i suoi imprestiti, salvo con legittima causa, e

col voler di cinque Consiglierl, di due Capi de' QuasiFu eletto da quarantuno Elettori, il quale era Ca- ranta, e delle due parti del Consiglio de' Pregati. Faliere e conte di Valdemarino in Trivigiana, ed era Itcm, che in luogo di tre mila pelli di Conigli, che ricco, e si trovara ambasciadore a Roma. E a dì 9, debbon dare i Zaratini per regalia al Doge, non tro di Settembre, dopo sepolto il s!io predecessore, fu/vandosi tante pelli, gli diano Ducati ottanta l'anno. chiamato il gran Consiglio, e fu preso di fare il Doge E poi a di 11, detto, misero etiam altre correzioni, giusta il solito. E furono fatti i cinque Correttori, che se il Doge, che sarà eletto, fosse fuori di VeneSer Bernardo Giustiniani Procuratore, Ser Paolo zia, i savj possano provvedere del suo ritorno. E Loredano, Ser Filippo Aurio, Ser Pietro Trivisano, quando fosse il Doge ammalato, sia Vicedoge uno € Ser Tommaso Viadro. I quali a dì 10, misero del Consiglieri, da essere eletto tra loro. E che il queste correzioni alla promozione del Doge: che i detto sia nominato Viceluogotenente di Messer, lo Consiglieri non odano gli Oratori e Nunzi de' Sig- Doge, quando i giudici faranno i suoi attì. E nota, nori, senza i Capi de' quaranta, ne possano rispon-perchi fu fatto Dege uno, ch' era assente, che fu dere ad alcuno, se non saranno quattro Consiglieri Vicedoge Ser Marino Badeero più vecchio de Consiglieri. Item, che il governo del Ducato sia com-sente la sua amante, egli areale scritte. Onde poi messo a Consiglieri, e a' Capi de' Quaranta, quando fu placitato nel detto Consiglio, e parve al Consiglio Vacherà il Ducato finchè sarà eletto l'altro Doge. sì per rispetto all'eti, come per la caldezza d'amore, E cosi a dì 11 di Settembre fu cre:ito il prefito Ma-1 di condanna

ione scrrino Faliero Doge. E fu preso, che il governo del rato, e poi ch'e' fosse bandito di Venezia e dal disDucato sia commesso a' Consiglieri e a' Capi de'tretto per un'anno. Per la qual condennagione Quaranta. I quali stiano in Palazzo di continuo, tanto piccola il Doge ne prese grande sdegno, parenôno che verrà il Doge. Sicché di continuo stiano dogli che non fosse stata fatta quella estiinazione in Palazzo due Consiglieri e un Capo de Quaranta. della cosa, che ricercava la sua digniti del Ducato. E subito furono spedite lettere al detto Doge, il E diceva, ch' eglino doveano averlo fatto appiccare quale era a Roma Oratore al Legato di Papa Inno-per la gola, o saltem bandirlo in perpetuo da Venecenzo VI. ch' era in Avignone. Fu preso nel gran zia. E perchè (quando dee succedere un'effetto è Consiglio d'eleggere dodici ambasciadori incontro a necessario che vi concorra la cangione a fare tal Marino Faliero Doge, il quale veniva da Roma. effetto) era destinato, che a Messer Marino Doge E giunto a Chioggia, il Podesta mandò Taddeo fosse tagliata la testa, perciò occorse, che entrata la Giustiniani suo figliuolo incontro, con quindici Quaresima il giorno dopo che fu condannato il detto Ganzaruoli. E poi venuto a S. Clemente nel Bucin- Ser Michele Steno, un gentiluomo da Cà Barbaro, toro, venne un gran caligo, adeo che il Bucintoro di natura co non ii pctă levare. Laonde il Doge co' gentiluomini dasse certe cose ai Padroni, ed era alla presenza de' nelle piatte vennero di lungo in questa Terra a' Signori l'Ammiraglio dell' Arsenale. Il quale in ó d'Ottobre del 1354. E dovendo smontare alla tesa la domanda, disse, che non si poteva fare riva della Paglia per lo caligo andarono ad ismon- Quel gentiluomo venne a parole coll' Ammiraglio, tare alla riva della Piazza in mezzo alle due colonne e diedegli un pugno su un'occhio. E perché avea dove si fa la Giustizia, che fu un malissimo augurio. un'anello in dito, coll' anello gli ruppe la pelle, e E a' 6, la mattina venne alla Chiesa di San Marco fece sangue. E l'Ammiraglio cosi battuto e insanalla laudazione di quello. Era in questo tempo guinato andò al Doge a lamentarsi, acciocchè il Doge Canceilier Grande Messer Benintende. I quaran- facesse fare gran punizione contra il detto da Cà tuno Elettori furon), Ser Giovanni Contarini, Ser' Barbaro: Il Doge disse: Che vuoi che ti faccia ? Andrea Giustiniani, Ser. Michele Morossini, Ser Guarda le ignoniniose parole stritte di me, e il modo Simone Dandolo, Ser Pietro Lando, Ser Marino ch'é stato punito quel ribuldo di Michele Steno, che Gradenigo, Ser Marco Dolfino, Ser Nicolò Faliero, le scrisse. E quale stima hanno i Quaranta fatto Ser Giovanni Quirini, Ser Lorenzo Soranzo, Ser della persona nostra? Laonde l'Ammiraglio gli Marco Bembo, Sere Stefano Belegno, Ser Francesco disse: Messer lo Doge, se voi rolete farvi Signore, e Loredano, Ser Marino Veniero, Ser Giovanni Mo-fare tagliare tutti questi belchi qatiluomini a pezzi, cenigo, Ser Andrea Barbaro, Ser Lorenzo Barbarigo, mi basta l'animo, dandomi roi ajuto, di farci Signore Ser Bettino da Mollino, Ser' Andrea Arizzo Procu- di questa Terra. E allora roi potrete eastijare tutti

· Marco Celsi, Ser Paolo Donato, Ser Ber-costoro. Inteso questo il Doge disse, Come si puo tucci Grimani, Ser Pietro Steno, Ser Luca Duodo, fare una simile cosa? E cosi entrarono in ragioniSer' Andrea Pisani, Ser Francesco Caravello, Ser inento. Jacopo Trivisano, Sere Schiavo Marcello, Ser Maffeo “Il Doge mand) a chiamere Ser Bertuccio Faliero Aimo, Ser Marco Capello, Ser Pancrazio Giorgio, suo nipote, il quale stava con lui in Palazzo, e enSer Giovanni Foscarini, Ser Tomaso Viadro, Sere trarono in questa macchinazione. Ne si partirono Schiava Polani, Ser Marco Polo, Ser Marino Sagre- di lì, che mandarono per Filippo Calendaro, uomo do, Sere Stefano Mariani, Ser Francesco Suriano, marittimo e di gran seguito, e per Bertuccio IsraelSer Orio Pasqualigo, Ser' Andrea Gritti Ser Buono lo, ingegnere e uomo astutissimo. E consigliatisi da Mosto.

insieme diede ordine di chiamare alcuni altri. E - Trattato di Messer Marino Faliero Doge, tratto così per alcuni giorni la notte si riducevano insieme da una Cronica antica. Essendo venuto il Giovedì in Palazzo in casa del Doge. E chiamarono a parte della Caccia, fu fatta giusta il solito la Caccia. E a parte altri, videlicet Niccol) Fagiuolo, Giovanni a'que' tempi dopo fatta la Caccia s'andava in Pa- da Corfù, Stefano Fagiano, Niccolò dalle Bende, lazzo del Doge in una di quelle sale, e con donne Niccolò Biondo, c Stefano Trivisano. E ordinù di facevasi una festicciuola, dove si bellava fino alla fare sedici o diciassette Capi in diversi luoghi della prima campana, e veniva una colazione; la quale Terra, i qualiavessero cadaun di loro quarant' uomini spesa faceva Messer le Doge, quando v'era la Doga-provvigionati, preparati, non dicendo a' detti suoi ressa. E poscia tutti andavano a casa sua. Sopra quaranta quello, che volessero fare. Ma che il giorno la qual festa, pare, che Ser Michele Steno, molto stabilito si mostrasse di far quistione tra loro in digiovane e povero gentiluomo, ma ardito e astuto, il versi luoghi, acciocchè il Doge facesse sonare a San quale era innamorato in certa donzella della Doga- Marco le campane, le quali non si possono suonare, ressa, essendo sul Solajo appresso le donne, facesse s' egli nol comanda. E al suono delle campane cert atto non conveniente, adeo che il Doge coman- questi sedici o diciasette co' suoi uomini venissero a dò ch'e' fosse-buttato giù dal Solajo. E cosi quegli San Marco alle strade, che buttano in Piazza. E scudieri del Doge lo spinsero giù di quel Solajo. così i nobili e primarj cittadini, che venissero in PiLaonde a Ser Michele parve, che fossegli stata fatta azza, per sapere del romore ciò ch'era, li tagliassero troppo grande ignominia. E non considerando al- a pezzi. E seguito questo, che fosse chiamato per tramente il fine, ma sopra quella passione fornita la Signore Messer Marino Faliero Doge. E fermate festa, e andati tutti via, quella notte egli andò, e le cose tra loro, stabilito fu, che questo dovess' essulla cadrega, dove sedeva il Doge nella Sala dell'Isere a' 15 d'Aprile del 1355 in giorno di Mercoled). Udienza (perchè allora i Dogi non tenevano panno| La quale macchinazione trattata fu tra loro tanto di seta sopra la cadrega, ma sedevano in una cadre- segretamente, che mai ne pure se ne sospetto, non ga di legno) scrisse alcune parole disoneste del che se ne sapesse cos' alcuna. Na il Signor' Iddio, Doge e della Dogaressa, cioè: Marin Faliero che ha sempre ajutato questa gloriosissima città e dalla bella moglie: Altri la gode, ed egli la mantiene. che per le santimonie e giustizie sue mai non l'ha E la mattina furono vedute tali parole scritte. E abbandonata, inspirà a un Beltramo Bergamasco il parve una brutta cosa. E per la Signoria fu com- quale fu messo Capo di quarant' uomini per uno de' messa lacosa agli Arvogadori del Comune con detti congiurati (il quale intese qualche parola, grande efficacia. I quali Avvogadori subito diedero sicchè comprese l'effeto, che doveva succedere, e il taglia grande per venire in chiaro della verità di chi qual era di casa di Ser Niccolò Lioni di Santo Steavea scritto tal lettera. E tandern si seppe, che fano) di an dare a d) **** d'Aprile a casa del detto Michele Steno aveale scritte. E fu per li Quaranta Ser Niccol.) Lioni. E gli disse ogni cosa dell' ordin preso di ritenerio; e ritenuto confess), che in quella dato. Il quale intese le cose, rimase come morto; passions d' essere stato spinto giù dal Solajo, pre-le intese molti particolariti, il detto Beltramo il

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