Jane Eyre: Easyread Edition

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ReadHowYouWant.com, 14 mar 2009 - 380 páginas
Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, (1847) was condemned and criticised at the time of its publication. Revolving around the life of an orphan, it presents her journey through life as she overcomes her hate-filled past and learns to feel passion and love for others.

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Índice

CHAPTER I
1
CHAPTER VI
77
CHAPTER VII
89
CHAPTER VIII
103
CHAPTER IX
115
CHAPTER X
128
CHAPTER XI
145
CHAPTER XII
170
CHAPTER XIV
204
CHAPTER XV
224
CHAPTER XVI
243
CHAPTER XVII
258
CHAPTER XVIII
290
CHAPTER XIX
313
CHAPTER XX
331
CHAPTER XXI
356

CHAPTER XIII
186

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Página 2 - Or where the Northern Ocean, in vast whirls, Boils round the naked melancholy isles Of farthest Thule, and the Atlantic surge Pours in among the stormy Hebrides; Who can recount what transmigrations there Are annual made? what nations come and go? And how the living clouds on clouds arise? Infinite wings ! till all the plume-dark air And rude resounding shore are one wild cry.
Página 69 - The garden was a wide inclosure, surrounded with walls so high as to exclude every glimpse of prospect ; a covered verandah ran down one side, and broad walks bordered a middle space divided into scores of little beds : these beds were assigned as gardens for the pupils to cultivate, and each bed had an owner. When full of flowers they would doubtless look pretty ; but now, at the latter end of January, all was wintry blight and brown deeay.
Página iii - Why have I alluded to this man ? I have alluded to him, reader, because I think I see in him an intellect profounder and more unique than his contemporaries have yet recognized ; because I regard him as the first social regenerator of the day — as the very master of that working corps who would restore to rectitude the warped system of things...
Página 87 - ... come when, I trust, we shall put them off in putting off our corruptible bodies; when debasement and sin will fall from us with this cumbrous frame of flesh, and only the spark of the spirit will remain — the impalpable principle of life and thought, pure as when it left the Creator to inspire the creature...
Página 94 - ... temporary privation. A brief address on those occasions would not be mistimed, wherein a judicious instructor would take the opportunity of referring to the sufferings of the primitive Christians; to the torments of martyrs; to the exhortations of our blessed Lord Himself, calling upon His disciples to take up their cross and follow Him; to His warnings that man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God; to His divine consolations, "If ye suffer...
Página 7 - I'll teach you to rummage my book-shelves: for they are mine; all the house belongs to me, or will do in a few years. Go and stand by the door, out of the way of the mirror and the windows.
Página 172 - Women are supposed to be very calm generally. But women feel just as men feel ; they need exercise for their faculties and a field for their efforts as much as their brothers do ; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, too absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer ; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. It is thoughtless to...
Página 163 - ... and within it a boudoir, both spread with white carpets, on which seemed laid brilliant garlands of flowers ; both ceiled with snowy mouldings of white grapes and vine-leaves, beneath which glowed in rich contrast crimson couches and ottomans ; while the ornaments on the pale Parian mantelpiece were of sparkling Bohemian glass, ruby red; and between the windows large mirrors repeated the general blending of snow and fire. " In what order you keep these rooms, Mrs. Fairfax ! " said I. " No dust,...
Página 30 - If you had such, would you like to go to them ? " I reflected. Poverty looks grim to grown people ; still more so to children : they have not much idea of industrious, working, respectable poverty ; they think of the word only as connected with ragged clothes, scanty food, fireless grates, rude manners, and debasing vices : poverty for me was synonymous with degradation. " No ; I should not like to belong to poor people," was my reply. " Not even if they were kind to you ? " I shook my head : I could...
Página 95 - Temple, Miss Temple, what - WHAT is that girl with curled hair? Red hair, ma'am, curled curled all over?" And extending his cane he pointed to the awful object, his hand shaking as he did so. "It is Julia Severn," replied Miss Temple, very quietly. "Julia Severn, ma'am! And why has she, or any other, curled hair? Why, in defiance of every precept and principle of this house, does she conform to the world so openly - here in an evangelical, charitable establishment - as to wear her hair one mass of...

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