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WATSON'S HANDBOOK OF CALISTHENICS AND GYN- THE NORMAL: or METHODS OF TEACHING THE NASTICB. By J. MADISON Watson. 8vo. Cloth.

Convoy BraxchE8-ORTITOEPY, ORTIOGRAPHY,

GRAMMAR, GEOGRAPHY, ARITHMETIC, AND E10$1.60, prepaid by mail. Published by SCHERMER

CUTION, By Alfred HOLBROOK, Principal of the HORN, BANCROFT & Co., 180 Grand Street, New South-Western Normal School,' Lebanon, Ohio,

York; 25 North Fourth Street, Philadelphia. Price $1,25. Barnes & Burr, New York. Part First of this volume, under the head of Vo

The plan of teaching spelling is worthy the consi. cal Gymnastics, embraces thorough and practical

deration of progressive teachers. The department

allotted to Grammar includes classification and de. articles on Respiration and Phonetics, a masterly finitions; improved methods of teaching Etymolotreatise on Elocution, and Recitations in Verse. gy, Syntax, and Analysis, to primary and advanced Part SECOND, the most extended and varied course

classés. of exercises in Calisthenics ever published. Part

In Geography, the entire outline of the best me

thods of teaching primary, secondary, and advanced Third, an exhaustive course of exercises in Gym- classes is embraced. nastics, with wands, duinb-bells, Indian clubs, and

The instructions for Map Drawing are very sag. hand-rings

gestive.

Mental, Written, and what is termed Theoretical This is the only gymnastic drill-book, with Arithmetic are taken in order, and we find some words of command, and classes of movements, sys- novel methods of demonstration that will not fail tematically arranged, in any language. It is the

to attract the attention of teachers. first work that seizes the theories of educators and

Elocution has received its full meed of consider

ation, We may not be able to endorse all that is philanthropists, " the forms of things unknown," comprehended under the head of Reading, Speak. and “ turns them into shapes.” In a word, it pre- ing, and Gesticulation, but the second section, which sents, in a simple and well-defined form, the means

embraces the means of training the voice, is one of rendering physical culture easy and certain to

that will not fail to commend itself to professors in

this department. the rich and the poor, to persons of all ages, either This book is brought out in the uniform style of individually or in classes.

Barnes & Burr's well known - Teachers' Library." Exercises for the lungs, the voice, the organs of

Tue Nopyal WRITTEN ARITHMETIC. By Edward speech, the joints, and all the muscles, are strictly

BROOKS, A.M.. Professor of Mathematics in Pa. classified, involving a prescribed number of posi

State Normal School. Published by Sower, Barnes

& Co., Philadelphia. tions and elementary movements, with an alınost. A few years ago an unpretending little book was innumerable variety of combinations. These move- presented to the public by Warren Colburn. This ments are executed simultaneously by several per

little work touched Arithmetic as with the wand of sons, in exact time, in connection with counting,

an enchantress, and transformed it, from a dry col

lection of mechanical processes, to a thing of intephonetics, recitations, or music, either vocal or in

rest and beauty. It infused a new spirit into the strumental, thus insuring geniality and generous science, which has developed itself in the many emulation alike in the school, the family, and the improvements of modern text books. gymnasium.

Mr. Brooks, in presenting his Normal Arithmetic,

handsomely acknowledges his obligations to this NINETEEN PIECES OF APPROPRIATE PIANOFORTE and to other works which have followed it. He has MUSIC are introduced. Those not composed ex. brought to the task of preparing his book much pressly for this work are selected and arranged from

reflection, and several years' successful experience

as a teacher. His method of treatment is both Inthe choicest productions of the ablest masters by

ductive and Deductive, embracing Analysis and the well known and eminent musicians and com

Synthesis. His arrangement is logical; his solutions posers, G. F. Bristow and H. B. DodworTU. and demonstrations are simple and clear. The woud-cuts are more numerous and better

The following feature are claimed as peculiar to

this work: new definitions of Number, Fraction, executed than those of any corresponding work,

Last Common Multiple, Ratio, etc.; new and coneither gymnastic or military. They are from ori

cise me:hod of explaining Greatest Common Divi. ginal designs, illustrating positions actually taken, sor; the development of Fractions by two distinct and movements executed by the author.

It is

methods; the Analytic and Synthetic methods of

developing Involution and Evolution; and the printed on fine and heavy tinted paper. The typo

greater attention to Involution as a preparation to graphy is unrivalled.

Erolution. A work of equal merit has seldom been pro

This book is the third in Mr. Brooks's series, it duced. It has already been adopted by the Board

being preceded by Normal Primary Arithmetic, and

Normal Mental Arithinetic. These we hope to of Education of the Public Schools of New York

notice at some future time. City; and many orders have been received before

The following letter, addressed the book came from the press.

to the author of Willson's Readers, WELLS'S GRADED SCHOOL. By W. H. WELLS,

Supt. of the Chicago Public Schools. Price $1.00 shows how these valuable Readers by inail. A. S. Barnes & Burr, New York.

are esteemed in Pennsylvania. Tuis work embraces copious practical directions to teachers, observations on Primary Schools, School

Hiru School, LANCASTER, PA., Discipline, School Records, etc., etc.

November 12, 1863. Many of our best teachers, at least the best minds, Dear $1 :Your series of Readers promises to have no well defined conception of what a graded do a good work in relieving our common schools school is, and what the course of study should be ; and academies from certain pressure which now hence they work on no plan, circumstances deter- bears upon them. The Educational progress of the mining the course, and precluding all hope of a pro. age seems to demand that natural history and the per classification and graduated system of training. natural sciences be introduced into these schools as

To such we commend Mr. Wells's timely treatise branches of study that deserve to rank in importa as one that will organize, divide, systematize, and ance next to the old gentleman's "three Pics," render fully operative, school-room labor.

Reading, 'Riting, and 'Rithmetic.

1864.]

Advertisements.

25

Every intelligent teacher deplores the fact that mizing time, making school more attractire, and the natural sciences are almost wholly ignored in adding much to its efficiency. No other available the common school curriculum of study, though he means with wbich we are acquainted will so satis. must at the same time reluctantly admit that, as factorily accomplish the like desirable results. our schools are at present organized, these studies

Respectfully, cannot be pursued to advantage without serious

J. P. MOCASKEY. detriment to others, universally regarded as essential. Every such teacher would desire his pupils to

H A L L'S go forth into the world with at least a bias towards these bumanizing studies, with some thirst for GREAT GEOLOGICAL CHART, that knowledge which the Book of Nature ntfords; with the vivid impressions of his school-boy days

SIZE, 6 FEET 6 IN. BY 5 FEET, upon these snbjects coming back upon memory FINELY ENGRAVED, AND SUPERBLY COLORED. like the pleasant sound of his mother's voice; but

This chart is designed to exhibit to the eye the how rarely, under the existing condition of things, is he enabled to effect this!

order in which the successive layers or strata of

rocks are arranged, as it has thus far been deter. To accomplish this desirable result, text-books, already too numerous, must be multiplied; and

mined by geologists; and, also, the characteristio time, already too short, .must becomo even more

fossils which have mainly afforded the key to this crowded. Just at this point your Readers come for

arrangement. It is intended to exhibit the appear

ance that would be presented if a section, or cut, ward to relieve all concerned from an awkward

were made from the surface towards the centre of dilemma While, as attractive text-books in that branch,

the earth, thus exposing the different layers to

view by their edges. It is, in fact, such a reprethey teach reading as well as any others, and better

sentation as may be seen in the banks of many than many, they, at the same time, supply the place of a number of text-books on various sub

rivers, as the Niagara, or in the high rocky cliffs

of the lake or ocean shores, only it is much more jects. In the hands of a good teacher, they also

extended than any such natural exposures. give to the mind of the pupil the desired taste for the study of Nature, and leave him to a constant

This beautiful chart was prepared by Professor

Hall in the hope that it might render a study so acknowledgment of the Great Architect in his wonderful Works. They serve to “bend the twig,"

delightful in itself, and so practically useful, moro leaving for after years to show how much the tree

extensively introduced, and more easily under

stood. is inclined." They give a glimpse into the bidden world of science, enough to make the pupil desire

Unfortunately only a limited number of these a fuller view. They afford a taste sufficiently de

charts were produced from the lithographic stones.

The subscribers have now for sale a few of these cided to make him Jong for a full draught. No more than this can be effected in the study of the

charts, fresh and perfect, and they offer them Natural Sciences in the Common Schools, but even

MOUNTED ON CLOTHÍ AND ROLLERS for this is iofinitely better than that “ Nothing at all,”

$9.00 each; the sheets for same at $6.00.

KEY TO HALL'S GEOLOGICAL CUART, 75 no almost universally the rule, The teachers of the country, therefore, thank you

cents. for the relief you have afforded them in this direc- SCHERMERHORN, BANCROFT & CO., tion, You have conferred a substantial benefit,

180 Grand St, New York. both upon them and their pupils, in thus econo

25 N. Fourth St., Philadelphia

TEXT-BOOKS AND MAPS

PUBLISHED BY

CHARLES SCRIBNER,

124 Grand Street, New York.

GUYOT'S WALL MAPS, Large Series.
GUYOT'S WALL MAPS, Small Series.
GUYOT'S SLATED MAP DRAWING CARDS.

GUYOT'S PAPER MAP DRAWING CARDS.

THE NATURAL SERIES.

FELTER'S ARITHMETICS.
FELTER'S PRIMARY.
FELTER'S ANALYSIS, No. 1.

FELTER'S ANALYSIS, No. 2.

PALMER'S ALGEBRAS.
COMBINATION OF ARITHMETIC WITH ALGEBRA,
PALMER'S FIRST BOOK IN ALGEBRA,

PALMER'S ELEMENTS OF ALGEBRA,

OBJECT LESSONS.
SHELDON'S ELEMENTARY INSTRUCTION.
SHELDON'S MODEL LESSONS ON OBJECTS.
PRIMARY READER.

READING CHARTS.

Special Terms for Introduction.
Full descriptive circulars, with prices, sent on application to the Publisher

Just out! The" Book for Families, Schools, and Gymnasiums /

WATSON'S HAND - BOOK

ОР

CALISTHENICS AND GYMNASTICS.

By J. MADISON WATSON.

8vo. Cloth, $1.75. Part First of this volume, under the head of Vocal Gymnastics, embraces thorough and

practical articles on Respiration and Phonetics, a masterly treatise on Elocution, and Recitations in Verse. PAKT SEOUND, the most extended and varied course of exercises in Calisthenics ever published. Part Third, an exhaustive course of exercises in Gymnastics, with wands, dumb-bells, Indian clubs, and hand-rings.

This is the only gymnastic drill-book, with words of command, and classes of movements, systematically arranged, in any language. It is the first work that seizes the theories of educators and philanthropists, "the forms of things unknown," and "turns them into shapes."

In a word, it preBents, in a simple and well-defined form, the means of rendering pbysical culture easy and certain to the rich and the poor, to persons of all ages, either individually or in classes.

Exercises for the lungs, the voice, the organs of speech, the joints, and all the muscles, are strictly classified, involving a prescribed number of positions and elementary movements, with an almust innumerable variety of combinations. These movements are executed simultaneously by several persons, in exact time, in connection with counting, phonetics, recitations, or music, either pocal or instrumental, thus insuring geniality and generous emulation alike in the school, thu family, and the gymnasium

NINETEEN PIECES OF APPROPRIATE PIANOFORTE MUSIC Are introduced. Those not composed expressly for this work are selected and arranged, from the choicest productions of the ablest masters, by the well-known and eminent musicians and composers

G. F. BRISTOW AND H. B. DODWORTH. The wood-cuts are more numerous and better execnted than those of any corresponding work, either gymnastic or military. They are from original designs, illustrating positions actually taken, and movements executed by the author. It is printed on fine and heavy tinted paper. The typography is unrivalled.

WATSON'S GYMNASTIC APPARATUS,

For Schools, Families, and Gymnasiums. This is the most beautiful, convenient, and effective gymnastic apparatus ever devised. It is all made of well-seasoned wood, and is either bighly polished or varnished with shellac, at least three coats.

The desired weight is not secured by varying the size, but the material. The wood usually used for dumb-bells and Indian clubs is maple, bereh, birch, bickory, iron wood, and locust. Rosewood and lignum-vitæ make very superior bells and clubs. Wands are made of white-ash. Handrings are usually made of cherry and mahogany.

The wand has eight plane equal faces or sides. It is seren-eighths of an inch thick for men and women, and three-fourths for boys and girls. Its length is determined by the height of the person, It is made with or without metallic balls at the ends.

There are four sizes of dumb-bells. No. 1 is intended for men, and is usually made of heavy wood; No. 2 for women and youth, and Nos. 3 and 4 for boys and girls.

There are eight sizes of Indian clubs; four of long clubs, and fuur of short ones. Nos. 1 and 2 are intended for men; Nos. 8 and 4 for women and youth.

Two sizes of hand-rings afford a sufficient variety. No. 1 is intended for men and women; No. I for boys and giris. Circulars contaiuing Illustrations and Prices sent when applied for.

$

WATSON'S NATIONAL PHONETIC TABLETS.

These TABLETS, eight in number, each 24 by 80 inches in size, printed in colors and mounted in the best style, may be read at a distance of one hundred feet. They present in the simplest, most convenient, and attractive form for class drill, all the excelloncies of the American phonetic and the English phonic systeing, without any of their objectionable features, furnishing abundant and appro. priate material for the acquisition of the basis of all good delivery-a perfect articulation. This is done as follows:

1. By employing figured vowels and consonants, thus securing just as many distinct characters as there are elementary sounds in thu English language, without the introduction of a single new letter.

11. By giving a list of all letters and combinations of letters that ever represent these sounds, with the necessary exercises.

III. By furnishing all needful roles, and ample and apposite directions and explanations for instructors.

IV. By an exhaustive, though simple analysis of English words, both as spoken and written.

V. By phonetic reading, embracing any words usually mispronounced, and all the difficult combined sounds of the language, thus securing what inay be regarded as a complete vocal gymnasium.

These TABLETS are used in some of the best Academies, Public and Normal Schools, and Gym. nasiums of the United States. Price, mounted on heary boards in card form, $400; in the best map form, $6 00.

SCHERMERHORN, BANCROFT & CO.,
130 Grand St., New York, 26 North 4th St., Philadelphia.

SIMONSON'S

CIRCULAR ZOOLOGICAL CHART:

I Directory to the Study of the Animal Kingdom.

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Those on paper will be sent by mail at the prices named. This Chart is correctly and elegantly lithographed, and will be highly ornamental upon the walls of the library or school-room.

SCHERMERHORN, BANCROFT & CO., Publishers,

130 Grand St., New York, and 25 N. Fourth St., Philadelphia.

WHAT THE PAPERS SAY ABOUT

SIMONSON'S CIRCULAR ZOOLOGICAL CHART.

From the Hartford Daily Courant. This guide to teachers and students of Natural History brings together, in a very convenien: form, a great mass of valuable information respecting the Animal Kingdom. It gives the primary divisions of Vertebrates, Articulates, Radiates, and Mollusks, and also the several classes, orders, families, genera, and species, so that all may be seen at one glance. Take for instance the robin: we see that it is of the genus thrushes, of the family dentirostres, or tooth-billed group, of the order insessores, or perchers, and of the class land-birds, and under the general division of warm-blooded rertebrates. Thus a teacher or student will find it exceedingly useful for constant reference, and by its arrangement much time may be saved. The work has been carefully and thoronghly done, and presents a very neat appearance. We cordially commend it to all teachers and students of Natural History, as a very valuable help in schools, and also for reference in private families.

From the Hartford Times. SIMONSON'S ZOOLOGICAL CHART: A DIRECTORY TO THE STUDY OF THE ANIMAL KINGDOM. -It conveys, at a glance, the sum of existing knowledge in relation to the classes, orders, and fimilies of the whole Animal Kingdom, from Man down to the Sponges, the lowest organization in the scale. This elaborate and beautifully simple Chart may be said to contain, in the most compact and accessible forın possible, the knowledge that has been laboriously gained and garnered by such eminent explorers of Nature's fields as Cuvier and SWAMMERDAM. It is, in fact, a perfect compendiun. It supplies an actual want, not only of the scholar, but of the teacher. Indeed, it is of interest and value to every body. You can see from the Chart what family or species any bug, fish, small or large anin al belongs to. The fossils, too, are touched upon. The extinct MASTODON belongs to the same family as the elephant, and the horse is one of the species of the same order. Of beetles there are 40,000 species. The Chart is full of information, and its study can not fail to profit every one who consults it.

From the Evening Press, Hartford. This singularly ingenious Chart is the best thing of the kind which we have seen, and we learn that competent naturalists pronounce it very correct iu detail.

From the Daily Post. In arranging this Chart, which is a wonder of conciseness and simplicity, Professor Simonson has consulted the most celebrated authors, and has submitted it to the criticism of professed experts, who pronounce it complete.

From the New Haven Palladium.
It will prove a valuable guide to teachers and students of Natural History.

GREAT GEOLOGICAL CHART,

Size, 6 ft. 6 in. by 5 ft., FINELY ENGRAVED AND SUPERBLY COLORED. This chart is designed to exhibit to the ere the order in which the successive layers or strata of rocks are arranged, as it has thus far been determined by geologists; and, also, the characteristic fossils which have inainly afferded the key to this arrangeinent. It is intended to exhibit the appearance that would be presented if a section, or cut, were made from the surface toward the center of the earth, thus exposing the different layers to view by their edges. It is, in faet, such a represeutation as may be seen in the banks of many rivers, as the Niagara, or in the high rocky cliffs of the lake or ocean shores, only it is much more extended than any such natural exposures.

This beautiful chart was prepared by Professor Hall in the hope that it might render a study so delightful in itself, and so practicully useful, more extensively introduced, and more easily understood.

Unfortunatesy only a limited number of these charts were produced from the lithographic stones. The subscribers have now for sule a few of these charts, fresh and perfect, and they offer then MOUNTED ON CLOTIL AND ROLLERS for $9.00 each; the sheets for same at $6.00. KEY TO HALL'S GEOLOGICAL CHART, 75 Cts.

SCHERMERHORN, BANCROFT & CO.,

130 Grand St., New York, and 25 N. Fourth St.. Philadelphia. MASON & HAMLIN'S CABINET ORGANS Combine more really valuable qualities, for either Parlor, 11all, Church, or School, than any similar iustrument ever offered for sale. See unqualified indorsement of more than

150 Organists and Professional Musicians, Which is published in M. & Hl.'s illustrated Catalogne, and will be sent by mail rpon application. The CABINET ORGAN is the only instrument which contains the justly popular

UT MATIO SWELL, By wlich a more perfect crescendo and diminuendo can be obtained than can readily be appreciated by those who have not made a practical test of its merits.

The Cabinet Organs are incased in either Oak, Black Walnut, or Rosewood, and sold at prices ranging from $70 to $450. Warcrooms : 5 and 7 Mercer Street, New York; 274 Washington Street, Boston. Address,

MABON BROTHERS, New York, or

MASON & HAMLIN, Boston,

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A BOOK FOR ALL CHURCHES.

THE CHURCH SINGER,

I Collection of Sacred Music, Published by CARLETON & PORTER, 200 Mulberry Street, New York,

IS NOW READY. A great proportion of the material for this work is the result of several years' labor of Prof. C. C. CONVERSE, firmer organist of the Broadway Tabernacle New York, It embraces the finest music collected and composed during a residence in Germany und England, as well as the most popular tunes of American Authors, adapted to the nyinns in use by all denominations.

The great number and variety of CHANTS and SET PIECES found in this work will greatly enhance its Ya'ue, and the publishers commend it to the notice of all Churches as the best book of the age, according to the testimony of persons coinpeient to judge.

For sale by the traile venerally,
Price, single cupy: $1.25; per ilozen, $10.00.

NEW EDITIONS.
BROWN'S SERIES OF ENGLISH GRAMMARS.
1. Brown's FIRST SERIES OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 12mo, Price.

$0.30
2 BROW'S INSTITUTES OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 12mo, Price.

75 3. BROWN'S GRAMMAR OF ENGLISH GRAN MARS. 8vo. Price.

4.30 New editions of these popular Textbooks have recently been published, with the addition of Practical Exercises in ANALYSIS and PARSING, hy HENRY KIDDLE, A.M., Assistant Superintendent of Common Schools New York City. 1 bong bin ve long been the established favorite with very many of our most suctessful teachers. They are acknowledged by three who have given them a fair trial, to be the MOST SOUND, CLEAR, nud PRACTICAL Trentises on the English Lnu. glike that have ever been introduced to the notice of Teachers. They are rapidly becoming, from their extensive use and popularity. THE NATIONAL STANDARD.

Every Teacher should get the Books, and examine them for himself. * Send for a Cirenar showing their merits.

Esra Sheeimen Copies will be sent by mail, postage paid, on receipt of half the retail prices ; or 15 cents for the First Series, and 37 ceuts for the Institutes,

WILLIAM WOOD & CO., 61 Walker St., New York.

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