Imágenes de página
PDF
ePub
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]
[graphic]
[graphic]

very serious thing befell, for his father, the alderman, died in 1795. Those who love their Ingoldsby and everything that was his, as the present writer does, will be interested to know that he was buried at Upper Hardres (“Hards,” in the Kentish speech),

ST. MARY MAGDALENE, BURGATE STREET, CANTERBURY.

a small and lonely village, four miles from Canterbury, on the old Stone Street, as you go towards Lympne and Hythe. There, in the village church, high up on the south wall of the nave, the tablet to his memory may be found. What became of Elizabeth Fox is beyond our ken. We are told, in the Life and Letters of Richard Harris Barham, by his son the Reverend Richard Dalton Barham, that she was at the time a confirmed invalid. To three guardians had been given the administration of the comfortable patrimony of the boy, and by them he was sent to St. Paul's School, then in the City of London. Thence he went to Brasenose, Oxford, leaving the university with a modest B.A., degree in 1811. Meanwhile the villain of the piece had been at work, in the person of a dishonest attorney, one of his guardians, by whose practices his fortune was very seriously reduced. Returning to Canterbury, he seems to have contemplated studying for the law, but quickly relinquished the idea, and prepared himself for the Church. He was admitted to holy orders, and in 1813, in his twentyfifth year obtained a curacy at Ashford. This was

[graphic]

WESTWELL,

exchanged in the following year for the curacy of the neighbouring village of Westwell. Thus he was fairly launched on his professional career, becoming

[graphic]
[blocks in formation]

THE HALL, 61, BURGATE STREET, CANTERBURY, WHERE THE AUTHOR OF THE “INGOLDSBY LEGENDs" was BORN.
[To face p. 16.

[graphic]
« AnteriorContinuar »