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miscellaneous nature of the subjects discussed, seemed to make such a course ineligible; and rather to suggest the propriety of a distribution with reference to these subjects. I have now attempted therefore to class them under a few general Heads or titles, with a view to such a connection: And, though not very artificially digested, or strictly adhered to, I think the convenience of most readers will be found to have been consulted by this arrangement. The particular papers in each group or division, have also been placed in the order, rather of their natural dependence, or analogy to each other, than of the times when they were respectively written. I am now sensible that, by adopting this plan, I have brought more strikingly into view, the repetitions, as well as the discrepancies and small inconsistencies, which I take to be incident to this kind of writing. But this is a reproach, or disadvantage, to which I must be content to submit: and from which I do not apprehend that I shall have much to suffer, in the judgment of good-natured readers. There are many more important matters as to which !". conscious that I shall need all their indulgence: But to which I do not think it necessary, as I am sure it would not be prudent, now to direct their attention.

Before closing this notice, there is a little matter as to which several of my friends have suggested that I ought to take this opportunity of giving an explanation. My own first impression was, that this was unnecessary; and, but for the illustrious name which is connected with the subject, I should still be of that opinion. As it is, I cannot now refuse to say a few words on it. In the second volume of Mr. Lockhart's Life of Sir Walter Scott, there are (at page 219) several extracts from a letter of Sir Walter to Mr. George Ellis, dated in December 1808, and referring among other things to the projected establishment of the Quarterly Review: in connection with which topic, the following passage occurs—“Jeffrey has offered terms of pacification—engaging that no party politics should again appear in his Review. I told him I thought it was now too late; and reminded him that I had often pointed out to him the consequences of letting his work become a party tool. He said, he did not care for the consequences; They were but four men he feared as opponents, &c. All this was in great good humour. He has no suspicion of our Review whatever.” Now though I have no particular recollection of the conversation here alluded to, and should never dream, at any rate, of setting up any recollection of so distant an occurrence in o to a contemporary record of o such a man as Sir Walter Scott—I feel myself fusly warranted in saying that the words I have put in italics are calculated to convey an inaccurate impression of anything I could possibly have said on that occasion;––and that I am morally certain that I never offered to come i. any such engagement as these words, in their broad and unqualified sense, would seem to imply. Of course, I impute no intentional misrepresentation to Sir Walter Scott. Of that he was as incapable, as I trust I am of the baseness of making the imputation. Neither can I think it possible that he should have misunderstood me at the time. But in hastily writing a familiar letter I am satisfied that he has expressed himself inaccurately—or at least imperfectly—and used words which convey a far larger and more peremptory meaning than truly belonged to any thing I could have uttered. My reasons for this conviction I think may be stated, to the satisfaction even of those to whom the circumstances of the o may yet be unknown. My first reason is, that I most certainly had no power to come under any such engagement, without the consent of the original and leading &.". whom no such consent could then have been expected. I was not the Proprietor of the work—nor the representative, in any sense, of the proprietors—but merely the chosen so removeable) manager for the leading contributors; the greater part of whom certainly then looked upon the Political influence of the Review, as that which gave it its chief value and importance. This condition of things was matter of notoriety at Edinburgh at the time. But at all events nobody was more thoroughly aware of it than Sir Walter Scott. He has himself mentioned, in the #. already quoted, that he had frequently before remonstrated with me on what he hought the intemperate tone of some our political articles: and though I generally made the best defence I could for them, I io. more than one occasion on which, after admitting that the youthful ardour of some of our associates had carried them farther than I could approve of, I begged him to consider that it was quite impossible for me always to repress this—and to remember that I was but a Feudal monarch, who had but a slender control over his greater Barons—and really could not prevent them from occasionally waging a little private war, upon griefs or resentments of their own. I am as certain of having repeatedly expressed this sentiment, and used this illustration to Sir Walter Scott, as I am of my own existence. But in the next place it requires no precise recollection of words or occasions, to enable me now to say, that, neither in 1808, nor for long periods before and after, did my party principles . prejudices or predilections) sit so loosely upon me, as that I should ever have agreed to lay them aside, or to desist from their assertion, merely to secure the assistance of a contributor (however distinguished), to what would then have been a mere literary undertaking. For the value I then set on those principles I may still venture to refer to twenty-five years spent as their uncompromising advocate—at the hazard at least, if not to the injury, d my personal and professional interests. I have no wish at this moment to recall the particulars of that advocacy: But I think I may safely say that if, in December

1808, I could have bargained to desist from it, and to silence the Edinburgh Review as an organ of party, I might have stipulated for somewhat higher advantages than the occasional cooperation of Sir Walter Scott (for he never was a regular contributor even to the Quarterly) in a work in which I had little interest beyond that of commanding a ready vehicle for the dissemination of my own favoured opinions. All this rests, it will be observed, not upon the terms of any particular conversation, which might of course be imperfectly remembered—but upon my own certain knowledge of the principles by which I was actuated for a long course of years; and which I cannot but think were then indicated by a sufficient number of overt acts, to make it easy to establish the mastery they exercised over me, by extrinsic evidence, if necessary. If the prevalence of these principles, however, is plainly inconsistent with the literal accuracy of the passage in question, or the fact of my having actually made such an offer as is there mentioned, I think myself entitled to conclude that the statement in that passage is inaccurate; and that a careless expression has led to an incorrect representation of the fact. And here also I hope I may be permitted to refer to a very distinct recollection of the tenor, not of one but of many conversations with Sir Walter, in which he was directly apprised of the impossibility (even if I could have desired it) of excluding politics (which of course could mean nothing but party politics) from the Review. The undue preponderance of such articles in that journal was a frequent subject of remonstrance with him: and I perfectly remember that, when urging upon me the expediency of making Literature our great staple. and only indulging ji. in those more exciting discussions, I have repeatedly told him that, with the political influence we had already acquired, this was not to be expected— and that by such a course the popularity and authority of the Review would be fatally impaired, even for its literary judgments:—and upon one of these occasions, I am quite certain that I made use of this expression to him—“The Review, in short, has but two legs to stand on. Literature no doubt is one of them: But its Right leg is Politics.” Of this I have the clearest recollection. I have dwelt too long, I fear, on this slight but somewhat painful incident of my early days. But I cannot finally take leave of it without stating my own strong conviction of what must have actually passed on the occasion so often referred to; and of the way in which I conceive my illustrious friend to have been led to the inaccuracy I have already noticed, in his report of it. I have already said, that I do not pretend to have any recollection of this particular conversation: But combining the details which are given in Sir Walter's letter, with my certain knowledge of the tenor of many previous conversations on the same subject, I have now little doubt i. after deprecating his threatened secession from our ranks, 1 acknowledged my regret at the needless asperity of some of our recent diatribes on politics– expressed my own o of violence and personality in such discussions—and engaged to do what I could to repress or avoid such excesses for the future. It is easy, I think, to see how this engagement, to discourage, so far as my influence went, all o and unfair party politics, might be represented, in Sir Walter's brief and summary report, as an engagement to avoid party politics altogether:—the inaccuracy amounting only to the omission of a qualification,--to which he probably ascribed less importance than truly belonged to it. Other imputations, I am aware, have been publicly made against me, far heavier than this which has tempted me into so long an explanation. But with these I do not now concern myself: And, as they never gave me a moment's anxiety at the time, so I am now contented to refer for their refutation, to the tenor of all I have ever written, and the testimony of all to whom I have been personally known. With any thing bearing the name of Sir Walter Scott, however, the case is different: And when, from any statement of his, I feel that I may be accused, even of the venial offences of assuming a power which did not truly belong to me—or of being too ready to compromise my political opinions, from general love to litera-ture or deference to individual genius, I think myself called upon to offer all the explanations in my power:-While I do not stoop to meet, even with a formal denial, the absurd and degrading charges with which I have been occasionally assailed, by persons of a different description.

F. JEFFREY. Craigcrook, 10th November, 1843.

CONTENTS.

• Essays on the Nature and Principles of Taste. By ARchibald Alison, LL.B., F. R. S.,

Prebendary of Sarum. . . . . . . . . . . . .* - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

De la Littérature considérée dans ses Rapports avec les Institutions Sociales. Par Mad.
de SIAEL-Holstein. Avec un Précis de la Vie et les Ecrits de l'Auteur. . . . . . . . . .

. The Complete Works, in Philosophy, Politics, and Morals, of the late Dr. Benjamin

Franklin. Now first collected and arranged. With Memoirs of his Early Life,

written by Himself. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

, The Works of Jonathan Swift, D. D., Dean of St. Patrick's, Dublin. Containing Additional

Letters, Tracts, and Poems, not hitherto published. With Notes, and a Life of the

Author, by WALTER Scott, Esq. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Correspondance inédite de Madame du Deffand, avec D'Alembert, Montesquieu, le Pré-

sident Henault, La Duchesse du Maine, Mesdames de Choiseul, De Staal, &c. &c..

Lettres de Mademoiselle de Lespinasse, écrites depuis l’Année 1773 jusqu' à l’Année

1776, &c... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship: a Novel. From the German of Gorth E. . . . . . . . . .

The Correspondence of Samuel Richardson, Author of Pamela, Clarissa, and Sir Charles

Grand son: selected from the original Manuscripts bequeathed to his Family. To

which are prefixed, a Biographical Account of that Author, and Observations on his

Writings. By ANNA LETITIA BARBAuld. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Cote-pondance, Littéraire, Philosophique et Critique. Adressée à un Souverain d'Alle-

magne, depuis 1770 jusqu'à 1782. Par le BARon DE GRIMM, et par DiDERot . . . . .

Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Victor Alfieri. Written by Himself. . . . . . . . . . . . .

The Life and Posthumous Writings of William Cowper, Esq. With an Introductory

HISTORY AND HISTORICAL MEMOIRS.

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Premier Maire de Paris, et Membre des Trois Académies.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210

Considérations sur les Principaux Evénemens de la Révolution Française. Ouvrage

Posthume de Madame la Baronne de Staël. Publié par M. Le Duc DE BRoglie et

M. Le BARoN A. DE STAEL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215

Mémoires de Madame la Marquise de LARoch EJAQUELEIN ; avec deux Cartes du Théatre

de la Guerre de La Vendée. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-4

Mémoires de Frederique Sophie Wilhelmine de Prusse, Margrave de Bareith, Soeur de

Frederic le Grand. Ecrits de sa Main. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249

History of the Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus. By WASHINGToN IRv1NG.... 259

Memoirs of Zehir-ed-din Muhammed Baber, Emperor of Hindustan, written by Himself,

in the Jaghatai Turki, and translated partly by the late John LEypes, Esq. M. D
partly by William ERskINE, Esq. With Notes and a Geographical and Historicai

Introduction: together with a Map of the Countries between the Oxus and Jaxartes,

and a Memoir regarding its Construction, by Charles WADDINGTON, Esq., of the

East India Company's Engineers...................................... . . . . . . 272

POETRY.

Specimens of the British Poets; with Biographical and Critical Notices, and an Essay on

English Poetry. By Thomas CAMPBELL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286

The Dramatic Works of John Ford; with an Introduction and Explanatory Notes. By

HENRY WEBER, Esq.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299

Characters of Shakespeare's Plays. By WILLIAM HAzlitt......................... 309

Sardanapalus, a Tragedy. The Two Foscari, a Tragedy. Cain, a Mystery. By Lord

Byron. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316

Manfred ; a Dramatic Poem. By Lord ByRoN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - 330

Reliques of Robert Burns, consisting chiefly of Original Letters, Poems, and Critical

Observations on Scottish Songs. Collected and published by R. H. CRoxiek. . . . . . . 335

Gertrude of Wyoming, a Pennsylvania tale; and other Poems. By Thomas CAMPBELL,

author of “The Pleasures of Hope,” &c. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347

Theodric, a Domestic Tale: with other Poems. By Thomas CAMPBELL.............. 3.54

The Lay of the Last Minstrel: a Poem. By WALTER Scott........................ 359

The Lady of the Lake : a Poem. By WALTER Scott. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367

Poems. By the Reverend GEoRGE CRAbbe....................................... 380

The Borough: a Poem, in Twenty-four Letters. By the Rev. GeoRGE CRAbbe, LL.B. 387

Tales. By the Reverend GEoRGE CRABBE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.96

Tales of the Hall. By the Reverend GEoRGE CRABBE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405

Endymion: a Poetic Romance. By John KEATs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413

Lamia, Isabella. The Eve of St. Agnes, and other Poems. By John KEATs, author of

“Endymion” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . th.

Human Life: a Poem. By SAMUEL Rogers........................... . . . . . . . . . . 4.19

Roderick: The Last of the Goths. By Robert SouthEy, Esq., Poet-Laureate, and Mem-

ber of the Royal Spanish Academy.......................................... 424

Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto the Third. By Lord Byron...................... 434

The Prisoner of Chillon, and other Poems. By Lord ByRoN........................ th.

Lalla Rookh; an Oriental Romance. By Thomas MooRE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446

The Excursion; being a Portion of the Recluse, a Poem. By William Wordsworth. 457

The White Doe of Rylstone; or the Fate of the Nortons: a Poem. By WILLIAM Words-

WoRTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - 469

Records of Women: with other Poems. By Felicia HEMANs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 473

The Forest Sanctuary: with other Poems. By FELIci A HEMANs... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ib.

PHILOSOPHY OF THE MIND, METAPHYSICS, AND JURISPRUDENCE,

Traités de Législation Civile et Pénale; précédés de Principes Généraux de Législation,

et d'une Vue d'un Corps complet de Droit; terminés par un Essai sur l'influence

des Tems et des Lieux relativement aux Lois. Par M. JérôMiE BENTHAM, Juriscon-

sulte Anglois. Publiés en François par M. DuMont de Geneve, d'après les Manu-

scrits confiés par l'Auteur.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 479.

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*Account of the Life and Writings of Thomas Reid, D.D., F.R.S. Edinburgh, late Professo”

of Moral Philosophy in the University of Glasgow. By DUGALD STEwART, F.R.S. 486

Memoirs of Dr. Joseph Priestley, to the Year 1795, written by himself: With a Continua-

tion to the Time of his Decease, by his Son Joseph Priestley; and Observations on

his Writings. By Thomas Cooper, President Judge of the Fourth District of Penn-

sylvania, and the Reverend William Christie... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492

Academical Questions. By the Right Honourable WILLIAM DRUMMOND, K.C., F.R.S.,

F.R.S.E. Author of a Translation of Persius. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496

• An Account of the Life and Writings of James Beattie, LL.D., late Professor of Moral

Philosophy and Logic in the Marischal College and University of Aberdeen: includ-

ing many of his original Letters. By Sir W. Forbes of Pitsligo, Baronet, one of the

o Executors of Dr. Beattie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 501

Philosophical Essays. By Dugald STEwART, Esq., F.R.S. Edinburgh, Emeritus Pro-

fessor of Moral Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh, &c. &c... . . . . . . . . . . . 504

o

Novels, TALEs, AND PRose works of FICTION.

iTales of Fashionable Life. By Miss EDGEworth, Author of “Practical Education,”

* Belinda,” “Castle Rackrent,” &c.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512. 517

Waverley, or 'Tis Sixty Years Since. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523 ±

Tales of My Landlord, collected and arranged by Jedediah Cleishbotham, Schoolmaster

and Parish Clerk of the Parish of Gandercleugh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 528

Rob Roy. By the Author of “Waverley,” “Guy Mannering,” and “The Antiquary” 535

Ivanhoe. A Romance. By the Author of “Waverley,” &c......................... 537

The Novels and Tales of the Author of “Waverley;” comprising “Waverley,” “Guy
Mannering,” “Antiquary,” “Rob Roy,” “Tales of My Landlord, First, Second, and
Third Series;” New Edition, with a copious Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ib.

The Fortunes of Nigel. By the Author of “Waverley,” “Kenilworth,” &c.. . . . . . . . . 543

Annals of the Parish, or the Chronicles of Dalmailing, during the Ministry of the Rev.

Micah Balwhidder. Written by Himself. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548

The Ayrshire Legatees, or the Pringle Family. By the Author of “Annals of the

Parish,” &c.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ib.

The Provost. By the Author of “Annals of the Parish,” “Ayrshire Legatees,” &c. ... ib.

St Andrew Wyllie of that Ilk. By the Author of “Annals of the Parish,” &c.. . . . . . . ib.

The Steam Boat. By the Author of “Annals of the Parish,” &c. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ib.

The Entall, or the Lairds of Grippy. By the Author of “Annals of the Parish,” “Sir

Andrew Wyllie,” &c.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ib.

Broan Gilhaize, or the Covenanters. By the Author of “Annals of the Parish,” &c... ib.
Valerius, a Roman Story. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ib.
Lehts and Shadows of Scottish Life....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ib.
some Passages in the Life of Mr. Adam Blair, Minister of the Gospel at Cross-Meikle... ib.
** of Margaret Lyndsay. By the Author of “Lights and Shadows of Scottish b
e". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . td.
Regnald Dalton. By the Author of “Valerius,” and “Adam Blair”.................. ib.

GENERAL POLITICS.

Essay on the Practice of the British Government, distinguished from the abstract The-

ory on which it is supposed to be founded. By Gould FRANcis Leckie. . . . . . . . . . 564

: A Song of Triumph. By W. Sotheby, Esq. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577

l'Arte Constitutionnel, en la Séance du 9 Avril, 1814 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ib.

of Bonaparte, the Bourbons, and the Necessity of rallying round our legitimate Princes

- for the Happiness of France and of Europe. By F. Chateaubriand. . . . . . . . . . . . . ib.

*Peech of the Right Hon. William Windham, in the House of Commons, May 26, 1809,

on Mr. Curwen's Bill, “for better securing the Independence and Purity of Par-

lament, by Preventing the procuring or obtaining of Seats by corrupt Practices” .. 594

*cr: Remarks on the State of Parties at the Close of the Year 1809 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604

The Hoory of Ireland. By John O'Driscol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610

*:::: the Life of the Right Honourable Richard Brinsley Sheridan. By Thomas 616

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