A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, Volumen 0

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Courier Corporation, 1 ene 1954 - 532 páginas
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"Maxwell is without a peer … this printing is an opportunity to become thoroughly acquainted with the thought of the greatest of our electrical scientists." — School Science and Math.
Here is the final elaboration of Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism, including the systematic and rigorous derivation of his general equations of field theory. These equations continue to occupy a central position in the modern physicist's view of the physical world. They are a magnificent summary of the fundamental advances in electricity and magnetism, and later inspired the theories of Lorentz on the electron and Einstein on relativity. Einstein himself has said that "The formulation of these equations is the most important event in physics since Newton's time" — The Evolution of Physics.
Volume 2, Part III, "Magnetism," develops a theory of magnetism through the study of solenoids and shells, magnetic induction, methods of observation, and terrestrial magnetism. Part IV, "Electromagnetism," covers the mutual action of electric currents, the equations of motion of a connected system, Maxwell's dynamical theory of electromagnetism, the equations of the electromagnetic field, dimensions of electric units, parallel and circular currents, coils, and the electromagnetic theory of light and foundation of the theory of relativity.

 

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PART
1
The potential of a magnetic shell at any point is the product
9
Expansion of the potential of a magnet in spherical harmonics
17
The action of this current compared with that of a magnetic
20
Magnetic force in a cylindric cavity in a magnet uniformly
23
Vectorpotential of magnetic induction
29
The potential at a point on the positive side of a shell
36
Solid angle found by two lineintegrations
42
Proper thickness of the wire of a galvanometer
359
717 Sensitive galvanometers
360
Law of thickness of the wire
361
Galvanometer with wire of uniform thickness
364
Thomsons sensitive coil
366
Webers electrodynamometer
367
Properties of a magnet when acted on by the earth
371
Suction of solenoids
372

Magnetic induction in different substances
49
Case of a body surrounded by a magnetic medium
55
00
72
CHAPTER VI
79
CHAPTER VII
95
Principle of collimation employed in the Kew magnetometer
101
Rotation produced by quartz turpentine c independently of magnetism 453
104
Observations of deflexion
108
Observation of vibrations
110
Case when is large
111
Statical method of measuring the horizontal force
114
Observation of the dircircle
120
J A Brouns method of correction
125
4
130
Gauss calculation of the 24 coefficients of the first four har
133
A small circuit acts at a great distance like a magnet
141
Reaction on the circuit
147
The wire is urged from the side on which its magnetic action
153
Ampères balance
159
Kinematical analysis of the phenomena 454
163
Determination of the form of the functions by Ampères fourth
172
ON THE INDUCTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS
175
The electromotive force due to induction does not depend
181
Faradays conception of an electrotonic state
188
CHAPTER IV
195
ON THE EQUATIONS OF MOTION OF A CONNECTED SYSTEM
199
Hamiltons equations of motion
205
CHAPTER VI
211
THEORY OF ELECTRIC CIRCUITS
223
CHAPTER VIII
229
Theory of a sliding piece
235
The general equations referred to moving axes
241
Electromagnetic force on a conductor
244
Relation between magnetic force and electric currents
251
CHAPTER X
263
The electrostatic energy expressed in terms of the electromotive
271
Explanation of these forces by the hypothesis of stress in
278
CURRENTSHEETS
286
Action of a variable magnetic system on the sheet
293
Case of curvilinear motion
299
The vectorpotential
305
A solenoid
310
Kinetic energy of the current
320
The motion of the axes changes nothing but the apparent value
321
Particular cases
326
Solid angle subtended by a circle at any point
334
Art Page 702 Lines of force round a circular current Fig XVIII
340
Differential equation of the potential of two circles
341
Approximation when the circles are very near one another
342
Further approximation
343
Coil of maximum selfinduction
345
Appendix I
347
Appendix II
350
CHAPTER XV
351
Construction of a standard coil
352
Mathematical theory of the galvanometer
353
Principle of the tangent galvanometer and the sine galvano meter
354
Gaugains eccentric suspension
356
Galvanometer with four coils
357
Galvanometer with three coils
358
Electrodynamometer with torsionarm
373
Motion in a logarithmic spiral
375
The quantities of the opposite kinds of magnetism in a magnet
377
Dead beat galvanometer
381
Properties of a magnetic particle
383
Correction for damping
388
Potential energy of a magnet in any field of force
389
Determination of
394
9
397
CHAPTER XVIII
402
Kirchhoffs method
403
Webers method by transient currents
404
His method of observation
405
Thomsons method by a revolving coil
408
Mathematical theory of the revolving coil
409
Calculation of the resistance
410
Corrections
411
CHAPTER XIX
413
The ratio of the units is a velocity
414
Current by convection
415
Weber and Kohlrauschs method
416
Thomsons method by separate electrometer and electrodyna mometer
417
Maxwells method by combined electrometer and electrodyna mometer
418
Electromagnetic measurement of the capacity of a condenser Jenkins method
419
Method by an intermittent current
420
Condenser and Wippe as an arm of Wheatstones bridge
421
Correction when the action is too rapid
423
Capacity of a condenser compared with the selfinduction of a coil
425
Coil and condenser combined
427
Electrostatic measure of resistance compared with its electro magnetic measure
430
Comparison of the properties of the electromagnetic medium
431
Corresponding case in two dimensions Fig
435
The specific inductive capacity of a dielectric is the square
437
Propagation of plane waves
444
CHAPTER XXI
451
The velocity of a circularlypolarized ray is different according to its direction of rotation
455
In media which of themselves have the rotatory property the velocity is different for right and lefthanded configurations
456
The luminiferous disturbance mathematically considered is a vector
457
Kinetic and potential energy of the medium
458
Condition of wavepropagation
459
Statement of the results of the analysis of the phenomenon
460
Hypothesis of molecular vortices
461
Variation of the vortices according to Helmholtzs law
462
Expression in terms of the current and the velocity
463
Velocity of a circularlypolarized ray
464
The magnetic rotation
465
Researches of Verdet
466
Note on a mechanical theory of molecular vortices
468
CHAPTER XXII
471
The phenomena of magnetic molecules may be imitated by electric currents
472
Simplicity of the electric theory
473
Theory of a current in a perfectly conducting circuit
474
Örsteds discovery of the action of an electric current on
475
Relative motion of four electric particles Fechners theory
481
Segregating force in a conductor
487
87
495
The electric current possesses energy
496
Action of an infinite straight current on any current in
497
His method of experimenting
503
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Sobre el autor (1954)

James Clerk Maxwell: In His Own Words — And Others
Dover reprinted Maxwell's Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism in 1954, surely one of the first classics of scientific literature over a thousand pages in length to be given new life and accessibility to students and researchers as a result of the paperback revolution of the 1950s. Matter and Motion followed in 1991 and Theory of Heat in 2001.

Some towering figures in science have to speak for themselves. Such is James Clerk Maxwell (1813–1879), the Scottish physicist and mathematician who formulated the basic equations of classical electromagnetic theory.

In the Author's Own Words:
"We may find illustrations of the highest doctrines of science in games and gymnastics, in traveling by land and by water, in storms of the air and of the sea, and wherever there is matter in motion."

"The 2nd law of thermodynamics has the same degree of truth as the statement that if you throw a tumblerful of water into the sea, you cannot get the same tumblerful of water out again." — James Clerk Maxwell

Critical Acclaim for James Clerk Maxwell:
"From a long view of the history of mankind — seen from, say, ten thousand years from now — there can be little doubt that the most significant event of the 19th century will be judged as Maxwell's discovery of the laws of electrodynamics. The American Civil War will pale into provincial insignificance in comparison with this important scientific event of the same decade." — Richard P. Feynman

"Maxwell's equations have had a greater impact on human history than any ten presidents." — Carl Sagan

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