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could have made such an impression into a desolate wilderness. It is with on the mind.

these feelings of loathing, loneliness, It is remarkable, also, that the and disgust, that he traverses the Childe Harold, of the first and second lovely but degraded regions of the cantos, is not the Childe Harold of Morea, contrasts its present abject the third. In the space that elapses be state with its former dignity, grantween his pilgrimage through Greece, deur, and elevation ; wandering av and his reappearance on the plains of mong the ivied columns “ which l'ime Waterloo, his moral constitution seems and Turk have spared,” and heaving to haveundergone a remarkable change. many a sigh, as he perceives It is true, that his curses on the de

" The fiery souls, that might have led spot are as long and loud,--and his Her sons to deeds sublime, disdain of the slave as deep and root- Now crawl from cradle to the grave, ed,--and his admiration of patriotism Slavesnay the bondsmen of a slave, as warm and fervent on the field of And callous-save to crime !" Morat, as on the plains of Marathon ; At length a new era opens in his that his tenderness for female beauty, mind. He seems to be impregnated and female fidelity, is equally great; with the mystical philosophy of Words -and that his affection for the inno- worth, and feels himself to exist less cence of childhood remains unabated. as an individual of a particular speIn these feelings there is no change; cies, than as a portion of an eternal but it is not to these that we allude. spirit, that animates and pervades The Childe is introduced to us as one every thing within the dominions of who is satiated with the luxuries of Nature. life, and disgusted with the selfishness of the world ;-one, who con

" Where rose the mountains, there to

him were friends ; siders all his kind as faithless and un

Where roll'd the ocean, thereon was his feeling beings, divested of gratitude

home; for good offices, and sympathy for Where a blue sky, and glowing clime, exaffliction ; and he forsakes his native tends, land

He had the passion and the power to roam ; Pained, and pining in the dearth,

The desert, forest cavern, breaker's foam, And darkness of his spirits view

Were unto him companionship; they spake

A mutual language, clearer than the tome to traverse the ocean waves, and make of his land's tongue, which he would oft

forsake the wide world his country. It is not to form new friendships, for he ab- For Nature's pages glass'd by sunbeams on

the lake. jures his kind, and despises their companionship ;-he is aware that human Whether these emotions have spon. life consists of agitation, and feels taneously arisen within him, and the that the mind must be employed ;- beautiful and variegated banks of the yet he has no object to place on the Rhine, and the shores of Lake Lepedestal of the image he has torn from man, and the sublime and lonely its niche ;-though the world presents regions of the Alps, were esteemed him with nothing capable of arresting the most fit places for their developehis attachment, like the St Leon of ment and indulgence; or whether it Godwin, or the Ladurlad of Southey, was the scenery itself that kindled he feels endowed with a supernatural these emotions, we do not know, portion of vital energy ;-and though though we rather imagine that the surrounded by human beings, he is latter is the case. At all events, it is conscious that his curse is solitude. evident, that his Lordship had been

It is natural for the mourner to studying Wordsworth ; that he was shut his ears to the shouts of mirth, captivated with the delirating tone yet to turn his heart to the retrospec- that pervades his compositions; and, tive contemplation of happiness, and that he was himself smitten with an take delight only in what coincides enthusiastic admiration of all natural and associates with his own feelings. objects; and with the desire of define The Childe, as it were instinctively, ing aspirations to others, which are, looks towards Greece, where he be in fact, mysterious, and inexplicable holds the reflected image of himself; to himself. Notwithstanding this -the smiles of happiness turned into great and inherent deformity, there mourning, and the garden of existence is 4 majesty and commanding force,

BSERVATIONS

CONNECTED

WITH

a dignity of thought, and a depth of atmospherical phenomena, while it has pathos, in the delineation, and in the been known to pervade the whole terdissection of these feelings, which we restrial system, and to be an agent have never seen equalled elsewhere; both powerful and terrible. Instrue and which, we have little doubt, will ments have been invented even “ to place the third canto of Childe Harold scent the distant winds,”* but inventive in the eyes of posterity, among the powers have not been roused to the most noble and successful efforts of production of useful means of ascerthis sombre, but truly sublime ge- taining the electrical state of the air. nius.

M. The author of the paper in the Quar

terly Review seems inclined to believe that the Aurora Borealis is connected

with the arctic ice. This, however, may METEOROLOGY, WITH HINTS FOR be questioned ; for it has at different THE EXTENSION OF METEOROLO

periods appeared with great brilliancy, GICAL OBSERVATIONS.

and again dwindled away, while theice MR EDITOR,

was known to be stationary. It has been The breaking up of the ice in the more

frequent within the last three or arctic regions is an event which has four years, and seems to have been excited universal interest; and the particularly brilliant at the time of prospect it holds out of an ameliora- the breaking up of the ice. I had tion of our climate during the summer occasion, during the months of Januand autumn months, we may hope soon ary, February, and March 1817, to to be realised. On this subject a very be out of doors almost every night, interesting

paper has appeared in the and many times witnessed the most Quarterly Review; and, although phi- amazing display of the northern light, losophers may not be disposed to agree extending beyond the zenith, and in all the speculations of the author, sometimes covering almost the whole it must be acknowledged that he has hemisphere. On that night when the brought together some very curious most astonishing display I ever saw and important facts. However much was exhibited, there was a good deal we, who are intimately acquainted with of wind, and the clouds were moving the merits of Mr Scoresby, junior, rapidly. I regret that I have not had may lament that he has not been em- the same opportunity of observing the ployed in the expedition about to nocturnal sky during the winter just sail to the polar regions, we can have past; but some of your readers may no doubt of the result of the efforts probably be able to afford information, about to be made being highly inter- on a subject which will perhaps be esting and important. We have, be- found more intimately connected with sides, one advantage in the rejection climate than has been suspected. of Mr Scoresby's services, that he will

I am not prepared, at present, to return from Greenland at an early support the conjecture, that the vioperiod with intelligence respecting the lence and changes of the wind are state of the northern seas, whereas it frequently caused by the operations of may be a long time before we are ac- electricity. But I throw it out at quainted with the success of the ves present, with the view to tempt some sels sent out by Government. It may of your readers to make observations not be unreasonable in us to hope, on the force and direction of the wind, that the underwriters will allow a lit- in various parts of the country. One tle latitude to Mr Scoresby, that he of the most remarkable facts regarding may, without risk, be at liberty to the wind which has come to my knowland on the shores of Greenland, and ledge, is mentioned by Sir George to sail along the coast.

Mackenzie in his Travels in Iceland. During this period, so interesting That gentleman was at Stromness, in on account of the sudden and unlook- Orkney, when several vessels sailed ed-for detachment of the ice from from thence for America, with the Greenland, attention to the state of wind blowing fresh from the east. the atmosphere becomes exceedingly On the day after, the same wind conimportant. It is somewhat remark- tinuing, he sailed for Iceland, and able, that electricity has never been when about twenty miles to the westallowed to have what appears to be its due share of influence in producing * Vide Supp. Enc. Brit. article Climate

ward, overtook these vessels becalmed, day and night ; together with that of and the ship he was in was also be the sun and moon; and the halos a calmed. On his return to Orkney, he round them should be measured from found that the wind had continued time to time. It is only by observing to blow from the same quarter for se whether phenomena regularly coinveral days after he had sailed. This cide, or follow each other, that we fact affords ample room for specula- can determine their degree of contion; but we ought to multiply ob- nection ; and by a long continued and servations before we attempt to ge- accurate series of observations, that neralise.

we can hope to discover whether the There is no department of science in coincidence and sequence are the reso infant a state as meteorology; and, sults of cause and effect. at the same time, none perhaps more Having lately heard a discussion important or more interesting. I there- respecting the difference of the clie fore suggest that meteorological ob- mate on the east and west coasts of servations should be established at a Scotland, I was induced to examine variety of stations in different parts of the registers kept under the direction our island. The ingenious engineer of the Parliamentary Commissioners, of the Northern Lighthouses, requires chiefly for ascertaining the direction only a hint to establish registers in of the wind, by the resident engineers

every place to which his able super- of the Caledonian Canal ; from which da intendence extends. It would be of I have constructed the following table, 1 very great use to have a complete ap- which includes a period of ten years :

paratus in all the lighthouses around it is to be lamented that the servants Britain and Ireland, the keepers of of the Commissioners have not been which have ample time to attend to supplied with barometers and thermochanges in the atmosphere, and to meters. Inverness, Fort Augustus, note the indications of instruments. and Fort William, are in a line nearly It is recommended to every one who is S. W. and N. E. This table will, I

in the habit of making meteorological hope, excite some interest in many of a observations, to pay particular attention your readers, although it is by no

to the time when the wind changes or means so important as it would have
alters its intensity; and to observe whe- been, had the stations been due east
ther itgoes round by the south or north. and west of cach other. I may here
The direction of the clouds should point out a few facts not introduced
also be marked along with that of the into the tables.
air on the surface. The most importa In October 1808, there appear to
ant results would be derived from ob- have been two days of east wind at In-
servatories lying as nearly due east verness, four at Fort William, and

and west, and north and south, of each thirteen at Fort Augustus; and in EN

other as possible. For instance in the following month of November,
Scotland, observations made in the fourteen at Fort William, five at Fort
Bell Rock Lighthouse, in the observa- Augustus, and four at Inverness.
tory of Lord Gray at Kinfauns Castle, On the 8th May 1909, the wind
at Loch Earn Head, and at Oban, blew fresh from the west at Fort Wil.
would afford most desirable objects of liam, fresh from the south-west at
comparison. There is scarcely a clergy- Inverness, while it was blowing from
man, or farmer, without a barometer the east and north-east, also fresh, at
and thermometer; and although the the central point Fort Augustus.
instruments may not be of the nicest On the 15th June 1811, it blew a
construction, still they might contri- strong gale from the westward at
bute largely to our knowledge, if their Fort William and at Inverness, while
indications were regularly noted, to- at Fort Augustus it was calm and sul-
gether with the wind and rain. try.

It has been observed, that a swell Many other examples might be seon the sea precedes a gale of wind lected equally remarkable. By multifrom the quarter indicated by the plying observations, we might discover swell. When, therefore, a swell is the effects of the opposite currents of observed coming on, the state of all wind meeting, and rapidly arrive at a the meteorological instruments should point of knowledge, which it is indeed be noted at short intervals; also the surprising we have not long ago atappearance of the sky, both during the tained.

INo.of Days on which

Ditto with the Wind No. of Days when of the dry Days the Wind blew froin!

westerly, (deficiency the Eastward, at the no Rain, Snow, or there were, with the

S. N. calm or VaMist, at

Wind easterly, at
following Places :

riable)
Fort- Fort-
Fort- Fort-
Fort- Fort-

Fort-Fort-
Inver-
Inver-
Inver-

InverYears Wil Au

Wil-
Au-

Wil-
Au-

Wil

AU-
ness.
ness.
ness.

ness.
liam. gustus
liam. lgustus
liam. gustus

Liam. gustus

1807.101 |123 66 151 240 199 54 93 1808. 109 112 112 189 261 214 76 99 1809. 115 125 118 185 246 188 67 91 1810./1 13 125 116 211 1254 1221 104 100 1811. 83 112 88 |182 239 211 62 91 1812. 132 125 109 1219 179 203 107 71 |1813.102 92 87 200 200 230 83 50 1814. 138 103 76 187 200 1225 99 1815.108 83 79 186 184 198 81 49 (1816. 90 108 92 1198 199 200 54 69

34 53 111 140 64 80 106 129 59 95 111 108 66 80 125 122 46 104 101 143

89 72 119 45 99 97 148 46 80 81 |126 46

88 120 57 92 94 111

63

82

The Year 1807, in detail.

Ditto with the Wind No.of Dayson which No. of Days when of the dry Days the Wind blew from 10 Rain, Snow, or there were, with the westerly, (deficiency

S. N. calm or vathe Eastward, at Mist, at

Wind easterly, at

riable)
Fort-Fort-

Inver-
Fort-Fort-
Fort- Fort-

Fort- Fort-
Inver-

Inver-
Au-
Wil Au-
Wil-

Wil Au-
pess.
ness.
ness.

ness. liam. Igustus liam. Igustus liam. gustus liam. gustus

Inver

Au

Months. / Wil

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Ditto with the Wind No.of Dayson which No. of Days when of the dry Days the Wind blew from no Rain, Snow, or there were, with the

westerly, (deficiency

s. N. calm or vathe Eastward, at Mist, at

Wind easterly, at

riable,)
Fort- Fort Fort-Fort-

Fort-Fort-
Inver-

Fort- Fort-
Inver-
Invet-

Inver-
Au
Wil Au-
Wil Au-

Wil Au-
ness.
ness.

ness. liam. gustus

ness.
liam. Igustus

liam.
gustus

liam. gustus

Months. Wild

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I find I have omitted to remark, touris, and uthers his Majesties subthat it is understood the winter has iectis quha ar ludgeit within the said been unusually severe in Russia. It burgh, can not have ane cleine and will be curious if the ice opposite to frie passage and entrie to thair ludgethe coast of Siberia has remained un- ingis ; quhairthrow thair ludgeingis affected by the causes which have de ar becum so lothsume ynto thame, tached the ice on the same parallel on as they ar resolved rather to mak the opposite side of the pole. But, if choice of ludgeingis in the Canit has loosened, and come into contact nongate and Leyth, or some utheris with the Siberian coast, so as to be pairtis about the towne, nor to abyde fixed in the great bays eastward of the sycht of this schamefull vncleanes Nova Zembla, or in the White Sea, and filthiness ; quhilk is so universall the climate of Russia will become and in such abundance throuch all more severe during the winter, though the pairtis of this burgh, as in the the summer heat, owing to its inland heitt of somer it corruptis the air, and position, may not be affected. It may gives greit occasioun of seikness : and also be found, that the loosened ice has forder, this schamefull and beistlie filblocked up Bhering's Strait, which is thines is most detestable and odious narrow, and the only outlet for the in the sicht of strangeris, quho befloating ice on the side of the pole op- holding the same, ar constrayned with posite to us. If this has happened, the reassoun to gif oute mony disgracefull prospect of a passage to China by the speiches aganis this burgh, calling it pole will be remote. EURUS. a most filthie pudle of filth and vnEdinburgh, March 1818.

cleannes, the lyk quhairof is not to P. S.-I have just been informed, be seine in no pairt of the world; that two captains of Greenlandmen, quhilk being a greate discredite to while in Davis's Strait last summer,

the haill kingdome, that the prinobserved a pretty broad current go or cipall and heid burgh thairof sould 10° warmer than the water on each be so void of pollice, civilitie, ore side. The particulars of its breadth dour, and gude governement, as the and direction I have not heard. The hie streittis of the same cannot be appearance of such a current, if true, keipit cleine; and the Lordis of Sewill be a most interesting event.

creit Counsall, vnderstanding perfytelie that the said burgh, and all the

streittis and vennallis thairof, may very STATE OF EDINBURGH IN 1619.

easilie, and with litill ado, be keipit [The following Proclamation of the and haldin cleine, gif the people Privy Council of Scotland, will enable such thameselffis wer weill and civillie disof our readers as fecl any interest in the posit, and gif the Magistratis tuk caire improvement of the “ Gude Town,” to

to caus thame, and everie ane of estimate the progress it has made in the thame, keip the streittis foranentis important article of tidyness during the last thair awin boundis clein, as is done two hundred years.]

in vther civill, handsome, and weill Act Anent the Burgh of Edinburgh.

governeit cities : Thairroir, the FORSAMEKLE as the burgh of E- Lordis of Secreit Counsall commandis dinburgh, quhilk is the chief and and ordanis, be thir presents, the principall burgh of this kingdome, Provest and Baillies of Edinburgh to quhair the soverane and heich courtes tak and set downe sum setled and soof Parliament, his Majesties Preuie lide ordoure and course how the said Counsall and Colledge of Justice, and burgh and the cloissis, wyndis, and the Courtis of Justiciarie and Admi- streittis thairof may be haldin and ralitie ar ordinarlie haldin and keipt, kepit cleine, the middingis, and all and quhairunto the best pairt of the uther filthe and vncleannes removed, subiectis of this kingdome, of all de- and tane away, by appointing every greis, rankis, and qualities, hes a com neichbour of the toune to keip the moun and frequent resorte and repare, streittis foranent bis awin dwelling

-is now become so filthieand vncleine, cleane; and that no nichtbour lay and the streittis, venallis, wyndis, and thair middingis, souppingis of their cloissis thairoff so overlayd and coverit housis, nor na uther filthe, vpoun his with middingis, and with the filth nichtbouris boundis and hie streittis, and excrement of man and beist, as vnder some ressonable paines, to be the noblemen, counsellouris, servis imposit and exactit of the contraven

G8

VOL. II.

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