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paid into the treasury of the United States, in of the purchases of the above land ; leaving still

152

CHAPTER XI.

SALE OF LANDS BY THE INDIANS.

THE following is a statement of land purchased by the United States from the Indians up to the year

1820:

Total quantity, 191,778,536 acres. In payment for which, sums to the amount of 2,542,916 dollars have been appropriated.

Of these lands 18,601,930 acres, have been vended by the States' Government, and there remain in their possession 173,176,606 acres.

The sum of 22,229,180 dollars has actually been

part

due, (for which the land is a security) 22,000,657

dollars.

The account, then, will stand thus:

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Amount and Value of Annuities to Indians

22,229,180

2,542,916 By Cash received on Sale of Lands 1,700,716 Ditto still due on ditto

Expense of Surveys and Agency

22,000,657

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Lands unsold, viz., 173, 176,606 Acres, at

the lowest estimate, one dollar per acre 173,176,606

Balance of gain on the part of the United

States in dealing with the Indians · 213,162,811

* The price fixed by Congress is two dollars per acre.

How irresistibly, to say nothing of natural rights, do these transactions establish the claim of the Indians to protection and kindness from the United States !

The purchases of land from the Indians by the British Government do not exceed ten millions of acres; for 7,491,190 of which, the Indians receive goods annually amounting in value to 41551. Halifax currency, or 16,620 dollars. The British Government has not sold its lands, but, with the exception of a few hundred acres lately disposed of near Yorkin Upper Canada, has made gratuitous grants of them.

Besides which, about 20,000 Indians annually receive from the British government, blankets, and presents of various kinds--so that while the Americans have gained so largely by their intercourse with the natives within their territories, the British are annually losers. But both are awfully deficient in using means to improve the condition of the Indians.

155

CHAPTER XII.

NAMES OF THE DIFFERENT INDIAN NATIONS HITHER

TO DISCOVERED. IN NORTH AMERICA, THE SITUATION OF THEIR COUNTRIES, WITH THE NUMBER OF THEIR FIGHTING MEN.

THE Choctaws or Flatheads, on the Molect

4,500 The Natches

150 The Chukesws, Mississippi

750 The Cherokees, South Carolina

2,500 The Chatabas, between North and South Carolina

150 The Peantias, a wandering tribe, both sides of the Mississippi 800 The Kasgresquios or Illinois

600 The Piankishaws

250 The Qurachtenons on the Wabash

400 The Kikapous

300 The Shawanese or Sciota

500 The Delawares, on the west of Ohio

300 The Miamis

350 The Upper Creeks back of Georgia The Middle Creeks, North Florida

4,000 The Lower Creeks, East Florida The Caocutas, on the East of the River Alibamous

1700 The Alibamous, West of the Alibamous

600 The Arkansas

2,000

West Side.
The Anjoues, North of the Missouri
The Padilonians, West of the Mississipi
The White Panis, South of the Mississipi
The Freckled or Prickled Panis
The Cansas
The Osages

South of the Mississipi
The Grand Eaux

1,000

500 2,000 2,000 1,600

:600

1,000

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27,550 3,000 1,800 2,500 1,500

1,500

3,000

500 500

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400

250

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350

Brought forward
The Missouri, upon the River Missouri
The Sioux of the Woods, towards the heads
The Sioux of the Meadows of the Missouri
The Blanks Barbus, or White Indians with Beards
The Assiniboils, farther North near the Lakes
The Christaneaux
The Orusconsins, on the river of the same name, falling

into the Mississipi
The Mascordins
The Sakis

South of Pecan's Bay
The Mechuouakis)
Folle Avoini, or Wild Oat Indians
The Peans
The Potawatamis, near Detroit
The Missisagues, or River Indians, being wandering

tribes on Lakes Huron and Superior
The Ottapoas, Lake Superior
The Chepewas
The Weandots, Lake Erie
The Six Nations or Iroquois
The Round-headed Indian, near Ottawas
The Algonkins, near the above
The Nepessins, near ditto
The Chatas, St. Lawrence
The Amelestes, or the Bark
The Mukmacks, Bark of Nova Scotia
The Abenaques,

ditto
The Conaway Crunas, near the Falls of St. Lewis

700 350

2,000

900

5,000

300 1,500 2,500

300 400 130 550

700 350 200

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58,730 warriors, one-third old men, makes 78,306. Multiplying by six gives 469,836 souls, men, women, and children.

* * The publishers think it necessary to state that the M.S. of the above Indian names was in an almost illegible hand; and the author being in America, they had no means of correcting it.

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