Speech on Conciliation with America

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Cosimo, Inc., 1 jun. 2005 - 236 páginas
BCC: With extensive knowledge of political affairs, Edmund Burke possessed a glowing imagination and passionate sympathies expressed in his landmark speeches, which continue to captivate contemporary readers. The best of Burke's writings and speeches uphold his position on the need for rigorous constitutional statesmanship against widespread abuse of authority in government. He remains one of the foremost political thinkers of eighteenth-century England.AUTHOR BIO: British political writer and statesman EDMUND BURKE (1729-1797) was educated at a Quaker boarding school and at Trinity College in Dublin. His eloquence gained him a high position in Britain's Whig party, and although he never held public office, his public activity never ceased.His works include Observations on the Present State of the Nation (1769) and On the Causes of the Present Discontents (1770). Perhaps the finest of his many efforts are the speech on American taxation (1774) and the letter to the sheriffs of Bristol (1777), which advocated astute and moderate measures to impending public crises.

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This well-crafted address was presented as a series of suggestions for a way to conciliate the American colonists and avoid a revolt. The common-sense points that Burke makes and the ways that he goes ... Leer reseña completa

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scooestions fob teachers and students
lxvii
Notes
80

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Página 24 - Where this is the case in any part of the world, those who are free are by far the most proud and jealous of their freedom. Freedom is to them not only an enjoyment, but a kind of rank and privilege. Not seeing there that freedom, as in countries where it...
Página 76 - My hold of the colonies is in the close affection which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection. These are ties which, though light as air, are as strong as links of iron. Let the colonies always keep the idea of their civil rights associated with your government; they will cling and grapple to you, and no force under heaven will be of power to tear them from their allegiance.
Página lvi - He was bred to the law, which is, in my opinion, one of the first and noblest of human sciences ; a science which does more to quicken and invigorate the understanding, than all the other kinds of learning put together ; but it is not apt, except in persons very happily born, to open and to liberalize the mind exactly in the same proportion.
Página 137 - ... bales; Heard the heavens fill with shouting, and there rained a ghastly dew From the nations 'airy navies grappling in the central blue; Far along the world-wide whisper of the...
Página 18 - We know that whilst some of them draw the line and strike the harpoon on the coast of Africa, others run the longitude, and pursue their gigantic game along the coast of Brazil. No sea but what is vexed by their fisheries. No climate that is not witness to their toils.
Página 18 - ... through a wise and salutary neglect, a generous nature has been suffered to take her own way to perfection; when I reflect upon these effects, when I see how profitable they have been to us, — I feel all the pride of power sink, and all presumption in the wisdom of human contrivances melt, and die away within me. My rigor relents. I pardon something to the spirit of liberty.
Página 21 - Sir, that the great contests for freedom in this country were from the earliest times chiefly upon the question of taxing. Most of the contests in the ancient commonwealths turned primarily on the right of election of magistrates, or on the balance among the several orders of the state.
Página 124 - You well know, gentlemen, how soon one of those stupendous masses, now reposing on their shadows in perfect stillness — how soon, upon any call of patriotism or of necessity, it would assume the likeness of an animated thing, instinct with life and motion — how soon it would ruffle, as it were, its swelling plumage, how quickly it would put forth all its beauty and all its bravery, collect its scattered elements of strength, and awaken its dormant thunder.

Sobre el autor (2005)

Born in Ireland in 1729, Edmund Burke was an English statesman, author, and orator who is best remembered as a formidable advocate for those who were victims of injustice. He was the son of a Dublin lawyer and had also trained to practice law. In the 1760s, Burke was elected to the House of Commons from the Whig party. Burke spent most of his career in Parliament as a member of the Royal Opposition, who was not afraid of controversy, as shown by his support for the American Revolution and for Irish/Catholic rights. His best-known work is Reflections on the French Revolution (1790). Some other notable works are On Conciliation with the American Colonies (1775) and Impeachment of Warren Hastings (1788). Edmund Burke died in 1797.

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