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THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS

1915

DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY

12

QUARTERLY BULLETIN

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President

Vice-President

Secretary

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DETROIT LIBRARY COMMISSION:

HERBERT BOWEN RALPH PHELPS, Jr. BERNARD GINSBURG

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WW YORK

LOCATION OF LIBRARIES;

Central Library-Gratiot Avenue between Farmer and Farrar stzējš.
tendent's Office, Main 1333; Book Renewals, Main 3416.

Telephone. Superin

Branch 1-No. 1515 Woodward avenue, near the Boulevard. Telephone North 1529.
Branch 2-No. 887 Gratiot avenue, near McDougall. Telephone Ridge 249.

Branch 3-No. 464 Dix avenue, near Clark. Telephone West 938.

Branch 4-No. 287 Field avenue, corner of Agnes. Telephone East 729.

Branch 5-(Scripps' Park Branch) No. 605 Trumbull avenue, near Grand River. Telephone Grand 1957.

Branch 6-No. 1479 Michigan avenue, near 31st street. Telephone West 1921.

Branch 7-(Hurlbut Branch) Water Works Park. Telephone East.1535.

Branch 8-(Delray Branch) No. 2723 Jefferson avenue, west, near. Dearborn avenue. Telephone Cedar 547.

PUBLIC

HOURS OF OPENING

The Circulating and the Children's Departments of the Central library are open daily, except Sundays and holidays, from 9 o'clock a. m. to 9 o'clock p. m.

The Reference Department and the Periodical Reading-room are open daily, except Sundays and holidays, from 9 o'clock a. m. to 9 o'clock p. m., and on Sundays and holidays from 2 to 9 o'clock p. m.

All the Branch Libraries are open daily, except Sundays and holidays from 10 o'clock a. m. to 9 o'clock p. m. Branch 5, Children's Department, 11 a. m. to 7 o'clock p. m.

Legal Holidays are: New Year's Day (January 1); Washington's Birthday (February 22); Memorial Day (May 30); Independence Day (July 4); Labor Day (First Monday in September); Thanksgiving Day (Last Thursday in November); Christmas Day (December 25).

DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY

NOTES AND COMMENT

The present form of quarterly bulletin takes the place of the old form of annual bulletin which has been published for twenty-one years, but which is now discontinued. The more frequent issues of this new bulletin will furnish the public at short intervals information of books added to both central and branch libraries. The bulletin will be mailed to any address for 25 cents per year in advance, or it may be had at the library desk for five cents per copy.

The new building for Branch 2, which has been under contract since October, has made good progress since favorable weather set in. The walls are practically completed at this date and the roof will be on within a few days. The contractors agree to have the building ready by June. It is expected that the branch will open in its new quarters about July 1.

The City Council having accepted Mr. Carnegie's offer of $750,000, the Library Commission will plan for the immediate erection, probably, of three branch library buildings. One of these will be for Branth which is now in rented and very unsatisfactory quarters. As soon as a suitable site can be procured an architect will be set at work upon plans, with a view to an early..contract and the rapid construction of a building, to relieve the branch from its present crowded and sanitary situation.

The residents of the vicmity of West Warren avenue and the Boulevard have been petitioning for several years for a branch library. It is a well settled and growing section of the city, upwards of three miles from the city hall, with three large public schools. A library there should be well appreciated and show such appreciation by an extensive use of books. If the Board of Estimates, now in session, makes a suitable appropriation for a site. the Carnegie fund will furnish the means to erect the building at once.

Before anything can be done toward building the central library out of the Carnegie donation, the question of site must be settled. There are advocates of a down-town location, but such persons should bear in mind that down-town real estate is very expensive and that to secure a plat of necessary dimension with mean paying for building improvements which will be practically thrown away.

The better and stronger sentiment is; that, since the center of population has moved northward and retail business shows signs of following it. the library ought to go out Woodward avenue to the neighborhood of the ground secured for the new Art Museum and Concert Hall. Persons who criticise such move should understand that, in the event of removal, the present building will still be maintained as a down-town branch, with periodical and newspaper reading rooms, a fair equipment of ordinary reference books, and a circulating department which will include all the popular books which readers are now accustomed to draw there for home use.

The new library in its up-town location should be largely a reference library for students and scholars, who need for their study the quiet surroundings of a residence neighborhood.

BOOKS ADDED, JANUARY TO MARCH, 1910.

All books here listed are in the Central Library. Some of them are also in one or more of the branch libraries. These are indicated by figures following the title, indicating by number the branches in which they will be found. The locations of the branches by number are shown on the front page.

Any circulating book at the Central Library may be obtained at any branch upon filing there the reader's card and written application blank.

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