Ireland and the Great War

Portada
Cambridge University Press, 9 nov. 2000 - 208 páginas
This book explores the impact, both immediate and in its longer historical perspective, of the First World War upon Ireland across the broadest range of experience - nationalist, unionist, Catholic, Protestant - and in civilian social, economic and cultural terms, as well as purely military. Underscoring the work is a belief that the Great War is the single most central experience in twentieth-century Ireland and that the events of the war years, whether at home in Dublin during the Easter Rising or at the European battlefront, constitute a 'seamless robe' of Irish experience. The book also explores cultural responses to the war and its commemoration since 1918, up to the dedication of the Irish 'Peace Tower' in Belgium in November 1998. It argues that identifying and exploring the Irish Great War experience can contribute to the contemporary Irish peace process.

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Sobre el autor (2000)

Keith Jeffery was educated in Ireland, the USA and Cambridge (St John's College). In 2005 he came to Queen's, where he is Professor of British History, after teaching at the Ulster Polytechnic and the University of Ulster for over twenty years. Jeffery was awarded the Templer Medal from the Society for Army Historical Research in 2007 for the best book of the year (his biography of Sir Henry Wilson) on British Military History. Professor Jeffery has written a biography of the Irishman, Sir Henry Wilson, who was professional head of the British army in 1918-22. He has also been working on a history of the British empire. In 2005 Jeffery was appointed to write the first Official History of the British Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), covering the years 1909-49 (Bloomsbury Publishing September 2010).

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