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BY THE SAME AUTHOR.

Fifth Edition, 26th Thousand.

Price y. M., Cloth.

A SHORTER ENGLISH GRAMMAR,

WITH COPIOUS AND CAREFULLY GRADUATED EXERCISES.

Thirteenth Edition, 59th Thousand.
Price 2s., doth.

OUTLINES OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR,

FOR THE USE OF JUNIOR CLASSES.

Seventh Edition, Price gd., Cloth.
FIRST NOTIONS OF GRAMMAR,

FOR YOUNG LEARNERS.

Price is., Cloth.

ENGLISH GRAMMAR PRACTICE.

This work consists of the Exercises appended to the "Shorter English Grammar," published in a separate form.

ENGLISH GRAMMAR

INCLUDING

GRAMMATICAL ANALYSIS.

T DEPATMTMr OF EDUCATION
LELASD STAOTOBD JUfflOB UJJIVEESITY

By C. P. MASON, B.A., F.C.P.,

Fellow of University College, London.

TWENTY-NINTH EDITION.
(One Hundred and fifteenth Thousand.)

LONDON:
BELL & SONS, YORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN.

1886.

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PREFACE.

The explanations and acknowledgments prefixed to the twentyfourth edition of this work need not be repeated here. No modification of importance has been introduced into the present edition, but a few trivial oversights have been corrected. Attention is invited to the Addenda at the end of the book, in which some matters of interest are dealt with.

The Exercises in the older editions were inadequate for the purpose they should have served. In the present work I have introduced the most appropriate portions of the rather copious exercises attached to the 'Shorter English Grammar,' with such references to the entire series (republished separately in a cheap form under the title 'English Grammar Practice') as will enable learners who need greater practice in elementary work to go through the whole course. I strongly recommend that this should be done, if time can be found, as advanced pupils are often hampered by the lingering remains of early misconceptions.

For a fuller investigation of the Subjunctive Mood than space could be found for in the present work, the reader is referred to the Appendix to my 'Shorter English Grammar,' republished (with some additions; under the title 'Remarks on the Subjunctive and the so-called Potential Mood.'

Absolute agreement in the use of grammatical terms is certainly hopeless, and is perhaps not desirable; but one practice at any

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