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THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE,

*

For JANUARY, 1801.

Mr. URBAN,

W

Jan. 1.

HILE the term Jacolin is, perhaps, too indifcriminately applied to every opponent of Adminiftra***** tion, it is much to be feared that the plots and defigns of the real Jacobins are too little attended to. If hiftory is confulted, it will be found that most of the violent revolutions in modern times have begun with the Eftablished Church; fo it was in the reign of our unfortunate Charles I.; fo it was in the beginning of the French Revolution; and I have not a fingle doubt upon my mind, but that the prefent unprecedented and cruel perfecution of the Established Clergy may be traced to the fame diabolical motive; a perfecution in which, under the colour of fuits for non-refidence, clergymen, exemplary in their attention to their parishes, and to the discharge of their duty in every refpect, in many of the cafes actually refident, have been treated as criminals, and been almoft ruined by the very fevere penalties exacted from them.

Perhaps our rulers in Church and State are yet to be informed, that these perfecutions are carried on by the very fame infamous junto of Jacobins and Atheists, who were fome time ago expelled from a cel

lar notorious for fedition in the vicinity of one of the inns of court. Perhaps they are yet to be informed, that circular letters have been fent round to all the principal Diffenters, and all who are deemed difaffected to the Conflitution, foliciting fubfcriptions to aid them in the glorious caufe of rooting out the Eftablished Clergy, Thefe are facts, Sir, however, which can be proved, and the letters themselves can be produced in evidence.

With refpect to, the bufinefs of refidence itself, allow me to fay, Sir, that it is groffly mistaken. The act on which thefe perfecutions are founded was a Popish act, and has no reference whatever to the prefent conftitution of the Church. It was made profeffedly to prevent the revenues of the Church being spent at Romg; while the churches were left without any refident minifter, to be cafually fupplied by preaching friars. It can have no reference to a church where every parish muft have a refident minifter duly li cenfed by the bifhop; and in that cafe I beg, Sir, to know whether it is of any importance whether this minifter be called rector, vicar, or curate, except that, in ninecafes out of ten, the latter is the more acceptable, man? But, Sir, I mult go farther; I affirm that it is phyfically impoffible that every in

Under the many scenes which still furtound and hang over us at the conclusion of this century, a most awful and eventful period! let us still ruft that that Providence, which has hitherto been our protection, will yet be our refuge and safety. But this may not be without our own endeavours, and under a proper confidence in that Power which is allfufficient. That this is not the only feafon in which famine has vifited our foil, let the following extract from the Register of Marriages and Burials at Namptwich, in Chefhire, ferve as proof, copied by G. W. Manchester.

Extract, anno 1597.-" This yeare was a greate dearthe of corne and other victuals generally all over England; for wheate was fold at four markes the bushell; rye at forty-four fhillings; barlie at 285.; pease and beans at 325.; and målt at 40s.

Ale was

fold at 4d. per quart. The fear citie was fo greate, that many poor families were famished, and fundry of good account were utterly impoverished. N. B. The wages of artizans at this time was 73. per day.”

Walton, near Liverpool.

J. HOLT. cumbent'

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40 43 37 ,08 cloudy

Wind.

SW moderate 25 W moderate 3NW moderate SE calm

NW gentle 6NW gentle 2 NW moderate 8NW moderate SE calm

W. CARY, Optician, No. 182, near Norfolk Sereet, Strand.

Barom. Thermom. Hygrom.
I. 2. feet in.

29,88 50 48 14 3.2

·46 40 42
30 40

2536 38

State of Weather in December, 1801.

fine day, rain at night
bail ftorms

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hail storms

showers

.7

Powers

.4.

fhowers

.5

fun and fair, rain at night

•5

fun

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frost, thaw, fruft

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5. The honey fuckle begins to foliate.-10. The fea very noily in the evening12. An extensively beautiful horizon at funfet; the evening previous partially fo➡ 27. The fun o warm that the thermometer in the thade and in a Northern afpect Rood at 49°. Groundfel in flower.The year, as well as the century, with a few exceptions, has taken its leave in a very mild manner. The temperature of the air has been unufually warm and bland, and its vivifying powers are apparent uner various forms Amongst the vegetable tribes.Fall of rain 3.20 inches. Evaporation 2⠀ches.

Under

THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE,

W

For JANUAR Y, 1801.

Jan. 1.

Mr. URBAN, ****HILE the term Ja colin is, perhaps, too indifcriminately applied to every opponent of Adminiftra***** tion, it is much to be feared that the plots and defigns of the real Jacobins are too little attended to. If history is confulted, it will be found that moft of the violent revolutions in modern times have begun with the Eftablifhed Church; fo it was in the reign of our unfortunate Charles I.; fo it was in the beginning of the French Revolution; and I have not a single doubt upon my mind, but that the prefent unprecedented and cruel perfecution of the Established Clergy may be traced to the fame diabolical motive; a perfecution in which, under the colour of fuits for non-refidence, clergymen, exemplary in their attention to their parishes, and to the difcharge of their duty in every refpect, in many of the cafes actually refident, have been treated as criminals, and been almoft ruined by the very fevere penalties exacted from them.

Perhaps our rulers in Church and State are yet to be informed, that thefe perfecutions are carried on by the very fame infamous junto of Jacobins and Atheists, who were fome time ago expelled from a cel

lar notorious for fedition in the vicinity of one of the inns of court. Perhaps they are yet to be informed, that circular letters have been fent round to all the principal Diffenters, and all who are deemed difaffected to the Conflitution, foliciting fubfcriptions to aid them in the glorious caufe of rooting out the Eftablished Clergy, Thefe are facts, Sir, however, which can be proved, and the letters themselves can be produced in evidence.

With respect to, the bufinefs of refidence itfelf, allow me to fay, Sir, that it is groffly mistaken. The act on which thefe perfecutions are founded was a Popish act, and has no reference whatever to the prefent conftitution of the Church. It was made profeffedly to prevent the revenues of the Church being fpent at Rome; while the churches were left without any refident minifter, to be cafually fupplied by preaching friars. It can have no reference to a church where every parish muft have a refident minifter duly licenfed by the bifhop; and in that cafe I beg, Sir, to know whether it is of any importance whether this minifter be called rector, viear, or curate, except that, in nine. cates out of ten, the latter is the more acceptable, man? But, Sit, I mult go farther; I affirm that it is phyfically impoffible that every in

Under the many scenes which still furiound and hang over us at the conclusion of this century, a most awful and eventful period! let us still ruft that that Providence, which has hitherto been our protection, will yet be our refuge and fafety. But this may not be without our own endeavours, and under a proper confidence in that Power which is allfufficient. That this is not the only season in which famine has vifited our foil, let the following extract from the Register of Marriages and Burials at Namptwich, in Chefhire, ferve as proof, copied by G. W. Mauchefter.

Extract, anno 1597.-" This yeare was a greate dearthe of corne and other victuals generally all over England; for wheate was fold at four markes the bushell; rye at forty-four fhillings; barlie at 285.; peafe and beans at 325.; and mait at 40s. Ale was. fold at 4d. per quart. The fcar citie was fo greate, that many poor families were f mithed, and fundry of good account were utterly impoverished. N. B. The wages artizans at this time was 7 d. per day.”

Walton, near Liverpool.

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METEOROLOGICAL TABLE for January, 1801.

Height of Fahrenheit's Thermometer.

Month.
8 o'cl.

Morn.
Noon.

II O'cl..

D. of

Night.

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Height of Fahrenheit's Thermometer.

D. of

Month.

8 o'cl.

Morn.

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38 43

40

29,99 cloudy.

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43

,90 fmall

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48

37

,85 fair

15

31

43

41

,80 fair

16

43 46

43

,,Ez rain

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52 fair

2

42

48 46

71 fair

18 33 45

47

,7o thowery

19 39

4 44 46

47

55 tair

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360

40

,70. fair

49

47

54.

45 windy&cloud.

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46

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192 fair

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+962

44 41

78 fair

40

,80 fair

39

,88 fair

42 37

,50 cloudy

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39 30,07 cloudy

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37. კი

,28 rain & fnów

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40

,oz (cloudy

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35 28

79 fair

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44 40

,03 cloudy

26

26

[ocr errors]

fair

[ocr errors][merged small]

39

,10 cloudy

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,65 fnow & rain

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,08 cloudy

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"

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W. CARY, Optician, No. 182, near Norfolk-Sereet, "Strand.

Thermom. Hygrom State of Weather in December, 1801.
I. 2. feet in.

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SW moderate

46 40

42

4.2

bail ftorms

NW moderate

30 40 40

.0

hail storms

SE calm

25 36

38

[blocks in formation]

NW gentle

[blocks in formation]

.7

Mowers

NW gentle

[blocks in formation]

.4

fhowers

NW moderate

[blocks in formation]

.5

fun and fair, rain at night

8NW moderate

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SE calm

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

froft, thaw, frust

SE caim

31 32

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TrSE moderate

65 35 37

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12SE moderate

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-5

a thower, fun at intervals

13

SE calr

76132

14

c. calm

52 43

[ocr errors]

E calm

8341

16 SE calm

(St. gentle

30,10 41
50 38

18 S gentle

29,97 39

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19

SE gentle

8 37

20

Isw calm

70 45

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75 46

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75 46

23

SW calm

52

46

44444

39

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46

.2

foggy and little rain

46

.8

foggy and little rain

46

3.2

fun, clear and pleasant

46

4

fun, clear and pleasant

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rain

fun and pleasant, rain at night

fun and pleafant A. M. rain, fnow at night fun and pleasant

.0 fun and pleasant, rain and fnow at night

[blocks in formation]

43 33

35

.4

fnow

30

NW calm

31W calm

60 24
65 25 30

30

.7

fun and pleasant

4.0

fun and pleasant

5. The honey fuckle begins to foliate.-10. The fea very noify in the evening12. An extensively beautiful horizon at funfet; the evening previous partially fo27. The fun fo warm that the thermometer in the fhade and in a Northern afpect flood at 49°. Groundfel in flower.The year, as well as the century, with a few excep. The temperature of the air has been tions, has taken its leave in a very mild manner. unufually warm and bland, and its vivifying powers are apparent mar various, forms -Fall of rain 3.20 inches. Evaporation Arches. Amongst the vegetable tribes.

Under

THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE,

W

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Jan. 1.

Mr. URBAN, *****HILE the term Ja colin is, perhaps, too indifcriminately applied to every opponent of Adminiftra***** tion, it is much to be feared that the plots and defigns of the real Jacobins are too little attended to. If history is confulted, it will be found that moft of the violent revolutions in modern times have begun with the Eftablifhed Church; fo it was in the reign of our unfortunate Charles I.; fo it was in the beginning of the French Revolution; and I have not a fingle doubt upon my mind, but that the prefent unprecedented and cruel perfecution of the Established Clergy may be traced to the fame diabolical motive; a perfecution in which, under the colour of fuits for non-refidence, clergymen, exemplary in their attention to their parishes, and to the difcharge of their duty in every refpect, in many of the cafes actually refident, have been treated as criminals, and been almoft ruined by the very fevere penalties exacted from them.

Perhaps our rulers in Church and State are yet to be informed, that thefe perfecutions are carried on by the very fame infamous junto of Jacobins and Atheists, who were fome time ago expelled from a cel

1801.

lar notorious for fedition in the vicinity of one of the inns of court. Perhaps they are yet to be informed, that circular letters have been fent round to all the principal Diffenters, and all who are deemed difaffected to the Conftitution, foliciting fubfcriptions to aid them in the glorious caufe of rooting out the Eftablished Clergy, Thefe are facts, Sir, however, which can be proved, and the letters themselves can be produced in evidence.

With refpect to, the business of refidence itself, allow me to fay, Sir, that it is groffly mistaken. The act on which thefe perfecutions are founded was a Popish act, and has no reference whatever to the prefent conftitution of the Church. It was made profeffedly to prevent the revenues of the Church being spent at Rong; while the churches were left without any refident minifter, to be cafually fupplied by preaching friars. It can have no reference to a church where every parish muft have a refident minifter duly li cenfed by the bifhop; and in that cafe I beg, Sir, to know whether it is of any importance whether this minifter be called rector, viear, or curate, except that, in nine cafes out of ten, the latter is the more acceptable man? But, Sir, I mult go farther; I affirm that it is phyfically impoffible that every in

Under the many scenes which still furvound and hang over us at the conclusion of this century, a most awful and eventful period! let us still ruft that that Providence, which has hitherto been our protection, will yet be our refuge and safety. But this may not be without our own endeavours, and under a proper confidence in that Power which is allfufficient. That this is not the only feafon in which famine has vifited our foil, let the following extract from the Register of Marriages and Burials at Namptwich, in Chethire, ferve as proof, copied by G. W. Manchester.

Extract, anno 1597.-" This yeare was a greate dearthe of corne and other victuals generally all over England; for wheate was fold at four markes the bushell; rye at forty-four fhillings; barlie at 285.; pease and beans at 325.; and malt at 40s. Ale was. fold at 4d. per quart. The fcar citie was fo greate, that many poor families were famished, and fundry of good account were utterly impoverished, N, B. The wages of artizans at this time was 7 d. per day."

Walton, near Liverpool.

J. HOLT. cumbent'

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