The Left Bank: Writers, Artists, and Politics from the Popular Front to the Cold War

Portada
University of Chicago Press, 15 nov. 1998 - 319 páginas
This story begins in the Paris of the 1930s, when artists and writers stood at the center of the world stage. In the decade that saw the rise of the Nazis, much of the thinking world sought guidance from this extraordinary group of intellectuals. Herbert Lottman's chronicle follows the influential players—Gide, Malraux, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Koestler, Camus, and their pro-Fascist counterparts—through the German occupation, Liberation, and into the Cold War, when the struggle between superpowers all but drowned out their voices.

"Surprisingly fresh and intense. . . . A retrospective travelogue of the Left Bank in the days when it was the setting for almost all French intellectual activity. . . . Absorbing."—Naomi Bliven, New Yorker

"As an introduction to a period in French history already legendary, The Left Bank is superb."—Michael Dirda, Washington Post Book World

"An intellectual history. A history of the interaction between politics and letters. And a rumination on the limitless credulity of intellectuals."—Christopher Hitchens, New Statesman


 

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It was interesting to learn about the behavior of intellectuals before, during and after the occupation; but on the whole, the book is flat and fails to show the relevance of these thinkers to the broader world. It's a history of relationships and not ideas. Leer reseña completa

Índice

Moving In
7
Making Friends
14
At Home
19
Place of Work Place of Play
31
Smaller Worlds
39
The Thirties
45
Founding Fathers
47
Engagement with Moscow
54
Everybody Collaborated
165
The Resistance Through the Looking Glass
174
Midnight Presses
180
CNE and Company
188
Topography of German Paris
195
Parisians Far from Paris
202
Liberation
210
1944 and After
217

Engagement in Moscow
61
Right and Center
68
Unity of Action
76
In Defense of Culture
83
Malraux and the Intellectuals War
99
Gides Return
109
Plunging into Barbarity
119
Fleeing the Left Bank
128
The German Years
139
Capturing the NRF
141
Paris vs Vichy
151
The Structures of Collaboration
158
Picking Up the Pieces
219
Consequences
225
New Faces and Old
231
Changing Saint Germain des Prés
238
The Parting of Ways
248
Communists and AntiCommunists
256
Cold Warfare
264
No Third Way
277
Epilogue
284
Sources
289
Index
306
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Sobre el autor (1998)

Herbert Lottman was a journalist, biographer, and historian of French intellectual life. After World War II, he moved to Paris, France. He wrote a variety of articles and reviews for several American periodicals including Harper's, Saturday Review, the New York Times, and the New York Times Book Review. He was Publisher's Weekly's European correspondent for more than 30 years. After leaving Publisher's Weekly, he began contributing a regular European column to Bookseller. He wrote several books about France and its literary culture. He also wrote a series of authoritative studies of French authors Camus, Flaubert, Colette, and Jules Verne. After suffering through several degenerative diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, he died on August 27, 2014 at the age of 87.

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