The Dublin Mail: Or Intercepted Correspondence; to which is Added, a Packet of Poems

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J. Johnston, 1822 - 144 páginas

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Página 138 - Know ye the land where the cypress and myrtle Are emblems of deeds that are done in their clime? Where the rage of the vulture, the love of the turtle, Now melt into sorrow, now madden to crime...
Página 22 - I ihink on the hours I have sat on your knee, And the roll and the leer of your bonny blue ee; On the cut of that beautiful wig which you wore, And the curl of those whiskers, which now are no more : When I think on your front which, despising the Ways Of thin Dandies, was ready to burst through your stays ; When I think on your leg that has suffered so much From the gout, love, — and, Oh ! when I think on your crutch, I rejoice in the thought of still lending a hand To enable...
Página 89 - ... arming, Or rather not diminishing the MIGHT Which yet must firmly guarantee our right. And now, my friend, let me recount the pleasure Which we experience here beyond all measure. Nothing on earth can equal the delight With which the people, morning, noon, and night, Receive us and our FRIEND, th' illustrious Man, Whose air and affability they scan With such emotions as bespeak their 1 y, And shew them friends to order and to R y. When first I meditated this excursion, I look'd for pleasure,...
Página 19 - To receive ihe great man for whom nobody car'd, Till we heard he intended to scatter his money In Dublin, to render us joyous and funny. His presence and party no doubt will do good To all wholesale retailers of animal food ; To fruiterers, grocers, and dealers in spirit, And trades that are nameless, though not wanting merit. The first news that stirs I will write you again, Provided I'm in a true musical strain; Therefore, DICKY, adieu, still live and be merry, And remember your crony and friend,...
Página 49 - EPISTLE FROM THE CATHOLIC ARCHBISHOP OF DUBLIN TO THE POPE. TROY to his sovereign Lord the Pope Sends greeting, with the humble hope That he will not reproaches fling On Catholics, who love their King; But still who are in duty bound To bend with rev'rence to the ground, And shew their homage countless ways, To him who keeps the blessed keys Of heav'n's own bright celestial paddock ; Like him of yore* who mark'd the haddock ir
Página 24 - tis so strong you should wish to desert it, Into punch, my dear G , we can quickly convert it; — For we've cut out a branch from the Boyne (that has merit,) Right staunch orange water for mixing the spirit. WHISKEY PUNCH shall by Southey be sung to the skies, And champaign and white brandy shall yield up the prize ; And each loyal soul that belongs to the Boyne Is in hopes that you'll knight it, the same as Sir Loin. Come along then, my GY, and hasten my joys, Come, and do like the Prince of all...
Página 64 - And all of small capacity, May gain the language all at once, E'en if you were the first-rate dunce. Now to conclude this my oration, I'll give you, Sire, a dissertation On all my own immense perfections, Divided into several sections. First, then, I am completely pat in All tongues from Adam's down to Latin, Polish'd (as one may say) ad...
Página 22 - He is snoring behind me in bed, and, no doubt, His long promis'd Dukedom is dreaming about: By the bye, love, he'll take up this letter to you, And wont come back here before Sunday or so; Then, if you come to-morrow, pray don't take it ill, If I do all the honours myself with good will. I have been reading Pope's Eloisa all through, And it kindled such heavenly fancies of you, That the whole of my soul has expanded to night, And, like my mould candle, here melting outright. When I...
Página 118 - And oh, you told us not to fret, And said you'd make us happy yet, — Remember that you don't forget. Oh, wira, wira strue !" circumstances which gave occasion to the address, agreed to by the Lords and Commons of Ireland, induces me for a few days to delay giving a final answer; trusting that the joyful event of his Majesty's resuming the personal exercise of his Royal authority, may render it only...
Página 50 - And there admit a numerous bevy Of lords and gentlemen, to pay Their court in turn, and go away. However, to oblige us all, He sent his SEC. to LORD FINGALL, And bade him kindly intimate That he would wear his robes of state, And in a private chamber take The best address that I could make. We went — and humbly let me tell, His MY received us well. He held his hand most kindly out, And smil'd ; while each, in turn devout, Gave, as became a pious servant, A kiss most orthodox and fervent; Still...

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