Science and Ultimate Reality: Quantum Theory, Cosmology, and Complexity

Portada
John D. Barrow, Paul C. W. Davies, Charles L. Harper, Jr
Cambridge University Press, 22 abr. 2004 - 721 páginas
0 Reseñas
This volume provides a fascinating preview of the future of physics. It comprises contributions from leading thinkers in the field, inspired by the pioneering work of John Wheeler. Quantum theory represents a unifying theme within the book, covering topics such as the nature of physical reality, cosmic inflation, the arrow of time, models of the universe, superstrings, quantum gravity and cosmology. Attempts to formulate a final unification theory of physics are discussed, along with the existence of hidden dimensions of space, hidden cosmic matter, and the strange world of quantum technology. John Archibald Wheeler is one of the most influential scientists of the twentieth century. His extraordinary career has spanned momentous advances in physics, from the birth of the nuclear age to the conception of the quantum computer. Famous for coining the term "black hole," Professor Wheeler helped lay the foundations for the rebirth of gravitation as a mainstream branch of science, triggering the explosive growth in astrophysics and cosmology that followed. His early contributions to physics include the S matrix, the theory of nuclear rotation (with Edward Teller), the theory of nuclear fission (with Niels Bohr), action-at-a-distance electrodynamics (with Richard Feynman), positrons as backward-in-time electrons, the universal Fermi interaction (with Jayme Tiomno), muonic atoms, and the collective model of the nucleus. His inimitable style of thinking, quirky wit, and love of the bizarre have inspired generations of physicists.
 

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - fpagan - LibraryThing

Absorbing, sometimes semi-technical tome featuring a physics who's-who of chapter authors. Leer reseña completa

Índice

John Archibald Wheeler and the clash of ideas
3
An historians tribute to John Archibald Wheeler and scientific speculation through the ages
25
The heritage of Heraclitus John Archibald Wheeler and the itch to speculate
27
Quantum reality theory
43
Why is nature described by quantum theory?
45
Thoughtexperiments in honor of John Archibald Wheeler
72
It from qubit
90
The wave function it or bit?
103
Big questions in cosmology
361
Cosmic inflation and the arrow of time
363
Cosmology and immutability
402
Inflation quantum cosmology and the anthropic principle
426
Parallel universes
459
Quantum theories of gravity results and prospects
492
A genuinely evolving universe
528
Planckscale models of the universe
550

Quantum Darwinism and envariance
121
Using qubits to learn about it
138
Quantum gravity as an ordinary gauge theory
153
The Everett interpretation of quantum mechanics
167
Quantum reality experiment
199
Why the quantum? It from bit? A participatory universe? Three farreaching challenges from John Archibald Wheeler and their relation to experiment
201
Speakable and unspeakable past and future
221
Conceptual tensions between quantum mechanics and general relativity are there experimental consequences?
254
Breeding nonlocal Schrodinger cats a thoughtexperiment to explore the quantumclassical boundary
280
Quantum erasing the nature of reality or perhaps the reality of nature?
306
Quantum feedback and the quantumclassical transition
329
What quantum computers may tell us about quantum mechanics
345
Implications of additional spatial dimensions for questions in cosmology
564
Emergence life and related topics
575
Emergence us from it
577
True complexity and its associated ontology
607
The three origins cosmos life and mind
637
Autonomous agents
654
To see a world in a grain of sand
667
Science and Ultimate Reality Program Committees
691
Young Researchers Competition in honor of John Archibald Wheeler for physics graduate students postdoctoral fellows and young faculty
694
Index
697
Página de créditos

Términos y frases comunes

Referencias a este libro

Sobre el autor (2004)

John D. Barrow is a scientist who writes accessibly about astrophysics and cosmology for both the general reader and the expert. Born in 1952, in London, England, Barrow earned a B.S. degree with first-class honors from the University of Durham in 1974. Three years later he received his doctorate from Magdalen College, Oxford. He was a junior research lecturer in astrophysics at Oxford University from 1977 to 1980 and became a lecturer in astronomy at the University of Sussex in Brighton in 1981. With coauthor Joseph Silk, Barrow published The Left Hand of Creation: The Origin and Evolution of the Expanding Universe in 1983. The book, which explains particle physics and its application to the creation and evolution of the universe, quickly won praise for its lucid style. Barrow delved further into this topic in 1994 with The Origin of the Universe. In this work he explored such questions as the possibility of extra dimensions to space, the beginning of time, and how human existence is part and parcel of the origin and composition of the universe. Barrow's other books include Pi and the Sky; Theories of Everything; and The World Within the World. He has also contributed many articles to such professional journals as New Scientist, Scientific American, and Nature.

Información bibliográfica