Imágenes de página
PDF
ePub

.

.

22. THE CAMEL-A Caravan in the Desert .
23. The Arabian Camel .
24.

Ordinary Expression of the Camel
25. Expression of the Camel under ill-usage
26. Cells of the Camel's Stomach
27. Method of Tethering Camels .
28. THE INDIAN ELEPHANT—Male, Female, and Young
29. Elephant lying down,
30. Method of conveying Food to the Mouth
31. End of the Trunk in the Male
32.

Female. 33. Profile of Trunk . 34. Method of gathering long Herbage. 35. Another Example 36.

Method of holding Herbage. 37.

Method of holding a Carrot 38. The African Elephant 39. Elephant bathing 40. Elephants feeding 41. Wild Elephants sleeping 42. Extremity of the Elephant's Tail. 43. THE Ass-Ass and Foal . 44. The Wild Ass. 45. The Baggage-Mule . 46. The Zebra . 47. THE ROOK 48. The Rookery 49. Head of Rook 50. Head of Crow . 51. The Rookery in Winter 52.

Rook's Egg 53. THE SKY-LARK 54. The Sky-Lark and Nest 55, The Sky-Lark's Egg

Page 102 106 108 111 115 122 124 128 129 130 130 130 132 132 132 133 135 140 151 172 181 132 189 205 212 216

220

222

222 236 246 256 262

.

264

56. Another Example.
57. The Shore-Lark .
58. The Wood-Lark
59. Wood-Lark's Egg
60. THE CARRIER-DOVE
61. The Ring-Dove
62. Nest of the Ring-Dove .
63. Fingal's Cave.
64. The Turtle-Dove .
65. Egg of the Ring-Dove.
66. Egg of the Turtle-Dove
67. Egg of the Ringed-Plover

Page 264 274 288 289 294 300 301 304 306 330 331 331

[graphic]

THE DOG,

AS AN EXAMPLE OF FIDELITY.

WHATEVER a man's natural abilities may be, whatever his constitution or disposition, whatever his early training, whatever his present advantages or disadvantages, there is one thing which he may do with the greatest benefit to himself; which he must do, if he would have a clear conscience and a happy life. In all his duties and employments, whether few or many, he must be FAITHFUL; that is, he must perform them with earnestness, honesty, and sincerity, “not with eye-service," for the pleasure of man ; but “in singleness of heart, fearing God."

There is a continual temptation to forget this duty, and a constant need of being urged to the performance of it. Examples of unfaithfulness are too common, not only among servants who slight their duty when the master's eye is not upon them, but among all classes of persons. There is a want of faithfulness to known duty, of which few can plead innocent. How many words and actions daily testify to the insincerity, the want of uprightness and plain dealing, the absolute dishonesty of mankind! How many occasions of doing good, and of

« AnteriorContinuar »