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"To clothe a negro a year, costs from twenty to thirty dol* lars. His services may be purchased for from fifty to sev

enty dollars. A woman's for about half the same. The price of an able bodied negro man, is from five to seven hundred dollars.

“The slaves are ignorant, without any principles of reli'gion, or commonly of morality, and doubtless as vicious as

their condition and constant application to labour, will per(mit them to be.

Digression.-On Friday last, after our Pilot had stept aboard our Schooner from his beat, he asked if we would 'give to a poor fellow a passage to Baltimore? Being an"swered in the affirmative, a young man of genteel figure, but in a very rusty dress, and of uncleanly appearance, discovered himself above the companion way of the Pilot boat, 6 and without trunk or bundle, sprung aboard. He waved an affectionate adieu to those he left behind, and by his pronunciation, showed himself to be a foreigner. His clothing was worth to a person furnished with any other, less than five dollars. He soon discovered himself to be profane and dissolute; and to have been reduced from better circumstances 'to his present most pitiable condition.

"During the remainder of the passage, we learned, that he is a native of the Isle of Man- of reputable parentage, and whose youth had been spent in the lap of mistaken indul'gence. For at least a dozen years, he was attached to the · British Army and Navy, alternately; in connection with which, he had served in different capacities—but never

held a commission in either. He had served in India, South " America, the Mediterranean, Spain, British America, and the north of Europe. Had received in fourteen different

engagements, as many different wounds; lost two brothers, 'the one in South America, and the other in Spain. And

about nine months ago, in order to see the United States, • left the British service, contrary to the advice of those

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whose counsel should have governed him, and was passing on foot, through the forest of New Brunswick, in order to 'gain our eastern settlements, when he was met and attacked by a bear, from which he with difficulty escaped with his life. As singular as the facts may be, I think his statement is corroborated by that which appeared soon after, in the public papers, that without any weapon of defence, a man had closed with the animal who reared himself for the assault; and while nearly crushed to death in the rude em"brace of his savage assailant, had the presence of mind to • draw a knife from his pocket, and actually deliver his own life, by destroying that of the bear. He suffered severely, and has hardly recovered from the injuries he sustained.

"Having arrived in the United States, he loitered from 'town to town, without engaging in any regular employment that might gain him an honourable and permanent livelihood.

“In Norfolk, where he arrived in a packet from N. York, a few days ago, he spent the last of his money, and pawned, for less than half their value, every article of clothing with ' which he could dispense, and appear in the streets without positive indecency; and thus destitute, undertook to perform a journey on foot, from that town to Baltimore, two hundred miles. Having travelled to York, not more than " thirty miles, which he was three days in effecting, he found himself entirely pennyless, and too lame to proceed. At no great distance from that place, his entreaties prevailed with the master of a Pilot boat, to receive him on board, in order to obtain for him, if possible, a passage to Baltimore, in some vessel bound up the bay. He had now been on board the boat about a week. His object in visiting Baltimore, is to ask pecuniary assistance of relatives living in that place; or to obtain a birth in some South American Privateer; or a passage to that country, in order to regain a theatre of war, on which alone he appears fitted or able to act a part, that

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will secure him from the most abject indigence, and morti• fying sufferings.

“This affecting case enforces many a salutary and instructive lesson.

"1st. Reason may be impaired almost to extinction, by "the habitual indulgence of the appetites... This young man

would not, and with scarce a figure of speech, it may be 6 said, he could not calculate, while spending his last dollar

in scenes of dissipation and intemperance, on the most obvious, direct, and inevitable consequences of his folly. Until he actually felt the accumulated distresses which he now suffers, his reasoning powers were, from long disuse, unable 'to apprize him of their approach, when even the next step was about to give him the plunge.

“2nd. It would be absolutely impossible to convince this 'young man, that there are any religious or intellectual pleasures worth the seeking, or even the possession. So entirely subdued are all the nobler faculties of the man, by the excessive indulgence of those of the brute, that he is hardly conscious of possessing any other. If we except those pleasures which are purely animal, and those derived through the medium of a most voluptuous imagination, he knows and can know, in this world, not the shadow of enjoyment. I greatly question, whether any habit of acting, or abstinence which he can form, to say nothing of the difficulty of engaging him in a different course---a difficulty which has seldom or never been overcome in a similar case-I say that no habit he can form, would, without a supernatural change of his moral taste and affections, render any other than a life of sensual.indulgence, tolerable.

“What is true in his case, may be in others; and sanctions this general maxim:-Every repetition of criminal sensual indulgence, tends to merge the intellectual in the animal part of the man. And when from inveterate habit, the ap' petites acquire the ascendancy, the way of reformation is

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effectually barred. Divine grace alone can remove the obstructions, and that only by renewing the heart.

«3rd. Another lesson derived from this case, is, that the dissolute man will sacrifice every other thing to his degrading pleasures—his soul — his friends— his reputation—his veracity-none are too valuable to be immolated, if immolated they must be, or his pleasures relinquished.

"4th. A dissolute lise destroys that sensibility which the near approach of death awakens in the mind of the reflecting (and virtuous man. Two causes may be assigned for this fact: The one, that such are without a habit of reflection, and measure their miseries rather by what deprives them, and what they feel depriving them, of sensual enjoyments, than by what they anticipate. Their principle of estimating their circumstances, (if they can be said to form estimates by any principle) is depressed towards that which actuates the unthinking consciousnesses (for want of a better word), of irrational animals, when such evils or delights as awaken their sensations, approach them. It is little more than sensation.

“Another cause which commonly operates to produce in the minds of the dissolute, a profound insensibility to the ' fear of death, is a defective and erroneous view of the na"ture of death, as respects its consequences. Whatever may have conduced to their profligacy, will itself either cut them off from the means of correct religious instruction, or prevent · religious doctrines and all serious ideas from acquiring a "seat in their mind. The most formidable quality that, in the estimation of our profligate, death possesses, is its power to end his revels, and remove him from the scene of his earthly delight.

“Blessed religion of my Savidur, whose principles fortify the soul against the assaults of temptation, from the appetites! Whose efficacy alone can rescue the enslaved soul

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from their power. O may I bind its doctrines on my heart, and carry its spirit into all the details of my conduct.”

Several other extracts from this Journal, will be found in the Appendix. How depressed were his spirits, and yet how sustained he was, by considerations becoming his character and profession, will be manifest from the thoughts left on record by him, just before landing at Baltimore.

April 29. "I am wearied with the profaneness, vulgarity, senseless garrulity and levity of the uncultivated crew with which I ''sail. This is now the 21st day of my confinement on board, excepting two days spent in New York. I am wearied with the frequent disappointments that have occurred in our pro' gress. . I am wearied with my confinement to a small, crowded, filthy cabin; to a still more filthy and lumbered steerage; and to a deck loaded with spruce logs, piled more than six feet high. There is hardly a lucid spot amid the general gloom. If I look for friends, alas! I have not one on whose bosom I can repose this head, with perfect complacency, and unqualified confidence ! " There is not á being on earth from whom I have the most - distant hope of receiving the least aid in preparing for fu

ture usefulness and happiness in life, or in obtaining an eligible situation, when prepared. The God of Heaven

must be my patron, or I have none. I am going into the 'midst of strangers. Not the least acquaintance have I with an individual I ever expect to see again, in the State of Maryland or Virginia. I am now twenty-five years of age; almost three from College; have no profession; and my employment has been such since I left College, as to form me ito habits unfavourable to the acquisition of one. I am in'volved in debt, possess neither books nor money, and have a delicate and beloved wife to provide for. I am wearied with the same daily round of dull employment and still duller indulgences; of studying in circumstances forbidding

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