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this world ought not to feel themselves aggrieved in consequence thereof, if sometimes we think proper to extend our hands for the correction of those things which they have done amiss; inasmuch as they themselves also, in conformity with the power that has been entrusted to them, ought to aid us herein, and, when it is necessary and the obstinacy of any stands in need thereof, stoutly to resist the contumacy prompted by a spirit of wicked

Your royal excellency is not unaware what a grievous dissension has arisen between our venerable brethren, John, bishop of Dunkeld, and Hugh, bishop of Saint Andrew's; and although either party has undergone great labours, and submitted to great expenses, and, in the time of pope Lucius of blessed memory, our predecessor, held a long discussion thereon at the Apostolic See, they still were unable to bring the matter in dispute to a conclusion. And whereas lately the said bishops came to our presence, and discussed the said matters at length, in our hearing, upon which, by the advice of our brethren, we gave to the before-named bishop of Dunkeld power to act in the bishopric of Saint Andrew's, in opposition to the said bishop Hugh, and the said bishop of Saint Andrew's was sufficiently instructed in our presence, to return to his own place within a period named, upon the understanding that if he should not do so within the said time, our venerable brother Jocelyn, bishop of Glasgow, and our dearly beloved sons, the abbats of Melrose, Newbottle, and Dunfermline, should from thenceforth suspend him from the episcopal duties, and if he should after that prove contumacious, should place him under the ban of excommunication, and not revoke their sentence until such time as he should have come into our presence. For it is our wish, that this matter should no longer remain in a state of suspense, in order that thereby the said church of Saint Andrew's may incur no grave detriment to its interests, but rather that, the truth being known, with the aid of the Lord, by our means it may be brought to a suitable conclusion. We have also ordered the before-named bishop of Glasgow and his colleagues, relying upon our authority, to extend their protection to our dearly-beloved sons, Aiulph, dean of Lothian, Odo, the seneschal, Roger de Feric, and other clerks, friends of the beforenamed bishop of Dunkeld, from all molestation whatsoever, and not to allow their possessions or other goods, or the revenues of the said bishop to be seized upon by any person. And if any one shall presume to disregard this prohibition hereon, they are, by means of canonical censure, to restrain them in such course, no appeal to the contrary withstanding. To the end, therefore, that what we have ordered may without any difficulty whatever be complied with, we do advise your royal excellency, and exhort you in the Lord, and, for the remission of your sins, enjoin you, out of your love of justice, and your reverence for Saint Peter and for ourselves, to allow proceedings to be taken in this matter in conformity with the tenor of our mandates, and with your royal protection to defend the before-named dean and seneschal, and Robert de Fedic, and the rest of the kinsmen and friends of the beforenamed bishop of Dunkeld, as also the bishopric, and the rest of his revenues, and neither in any way to aggrieve them nor suffer them to be aggrieved by others; that so this dispute may without any hindrance be brought to a conclusion, and your royal mightiness may for this work of justice gain a neverfailing reward from God, and a good name among men. You are to know also, that we have enjoined the before-named bishops, in virtue of their obedience to us, not to receive anything from the churches or clergy subject to them in respect of the expenses which, in the transaction of the matters before-named, they are liable to incur, but to make it their care to supply the necessary expenses from their own venues alone. For we are unwilling that by their deeds the churches, or any persons in your kingdom, should incur any detriment whatever. We also wish it not to escape your royal excellency, that the before-named bishop of Õunkeld has so honorably conducted his cause, and has paid such deference to your kingly dignity, that he has made no proposition whatever, which might by any possibility redound to the derogation of your royal name, or, by reason of which, your serene highness ought to feel angered against him. Wherefore, if anything to the contrary shall be suggested to your highness by his opponents, you must not lend your royal ear to the words of such persons. Given at Verona, on the second day before the calends of August."

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The Letter of the same Pope to John, bishop of Glasgow, and the

abbats, his colleagues, on the same subject. “Urban, the bishop, servant of the servants of God, to his venerable brother, Jocelyn, bishop of Glasgow, and his dearlybeloved sons, the abbats of Melrose, Newbottle, and Dunfermline, health and the Apostolic benediction. Inasmuch as, by the duties enjoined upon us by God in virtue of our office, we are bound to give our earnest attention to all the churches, both those near to us as also those at a great distance, and if we know of any unreasonable attempts made by them, or by their ministers, to recall them to a more suitable line of con. duct; the princes of this world ought not to feel angered in consequence thereof. Your discreetness is not unaware what a grievous dissension has arisen between our venerable brethren, John, bishop of Dunkeld, and Hugh, bishop of Saint Andrew's; and although either party has undergone great labours and submitted to great expenses, and, in the time of pope Lucius, of blessed memory, our predecessor, held a long discussion thereon at the Apostolic See, they still were unable to bring the matter in dispute to a conclusion. And whereas lately the said bishops came to our presence and discussed the said matters at length in our hearing, upon which, by the advice of our brethren, we gave to the before-named bishop of Dunkeld power to act in the bishopric of Saint Andrew's, in opposition to the said bishop Hugh, and the said bishop of Saint Andrew's was sufficiently instructed in our presence to return to his own place within a period named. And to the end that our most dearly beloved son in Christ, the illustrious king of the Scots, may not by his power impede the prosecution of this business, we have warned him by our letters that he is to allow proceedings to be taken in this business according to the tenor of our mandate, and to defend with his royal protection our dearly beloved sons, Aiulph, dean of Lothian, Odo, the seneschal, and Robert de Fedic, and the other kinsmen of the abovenamed bishop of Dunkeld, and neither to aggrieve them in any way himself, nor suffer them to be aggrieved by others. To the end, therefore, that the business before-named may no longer remain in suspense, and the church of Saint Andrew's

thereby incur detriment to its own interests, we do, by these Apostolic writings, enjoin your discreetness, and do, in virtue of your obedience, order you, reducing to writing whatever you shall know of yourselves or through other persons on the subject of this business, to make it your care to inform us of the same, sending it to us under the protection of your seals, in order that we, being instructed by your intimations thereon, using the advice of our brethren, may proceed in the business in such manner as it is our duty to do.

And if any persons shall with rash daring lay hands upon the before-named dean, Odo, the seneschal, Robert de Fedic, or any

other friends of the bishop of Dunkeld, and their possessions or other property, or the bishopric and other revenues of the said bishop, then, fully relying on our authorization, you are, by canonical censure, to restrain them, without any obstacle thereto by way of appeal. Also, you will, on our behalf, forbid the said bishops, as we have also done orally, to receive anything whatever from the churches or clergy subject to them, in respect of the

expenses which they are liable to incur in the prosecution of the before-named business; as they are to supply the necessary expenses from their own revenues alone.

For we are unwilling that, by their deeds, they should cause detriment to the Church, or to any other person of your kingdom. Wherefore, by our authorization, you are strictly to warn the beforenamed bishop of Saint Andrew's, that, having received sufficient notice, he is to repair to our presence, within a time appointed by us for both parties. And if he shall not come, then you are, all appeal set aside, immediately to suspend him from his episcopal duties. And if even then he shall not show obedience thereto, you are to place him under the ban of excommunication, and not to relax your sentence, until such time as he shall have presented himself before us. Also, you are to intimate to his royal excellency that the before-named bishop of Dunkeld has so honorably conducted his cause, and has paid such deference to his kingly dignity, that he has made no proposition whatever which may by any possibility redound to the derogation of his royal name, or by reason of which he ought to feel angered against him. Wherefore, make it your care, by unceasing exhortations, to persuade him, that if any thing should be suggested by his opponents to the contrary,

he is not to lend his royal ear to their words. Given at Verona, on the second day before the calends of August.”

On the authority therefore of this letter, Jocelyn, bishop of Glasgow, and his colleagues, when the time drew nigh which had been appointed by the Supreme Pontiff for the hearing of the before-named bishops of Dunkeld and Saint Andrew's, summoned the before-named bishops a first, second, and third time to set out upon their journey: on which the bishop of Dunkeld came, but the bishop of Saint Andrew's, staying beyond the time, delayed coming, whereupon the above-named indges delegate suspended him from the episcopal duties, and then, in consequence of his contumacy, according to the tenor of the Apostolic mandate, excommunicated him.

In the same year, Philip, king of France, demanded of Henry, king of England, the charge of the daughter of Geoffrey, earl of Brittany, whom at his death he left his heir; a thing which the king of England would on no account comply with, but sent to him Walter, archbishop of Rouen, William de Mandeville, earl of Aumarle, and Ranulph de Glanville, the justiciary of England, at whose instance the king of France made a truce, and promised to keep the peace until the feast of Saint Hilary then next ensuing. In the same year, Richard de Vals, a knight of the king of France, fortified a castle in his vill of Vals, between Gisors and Trie; on seeing which, Henry de Vere, constable of Gisors, under the before-named William, earl of Aumarle, took it amiss, and, wishing to impede the work if he possibly could, came thither with his people; on which the men of the before-named Richard de Vals went out to meet him, and an engagement taking place, Rader, the son of Richard de Vals, was slain, and after many men of the said Richard had been wounded, they took to flight. The said Henry de Vere, however, not daring to return to Gisors, went to Richard, earl of Poitou. On this becoming known to the king of France, he ordered that all who belonged to the territories of the king of England, both clergy and laymen, who should be found in his dominions, should be taken in custody, together with all their chattels. On the other hand, the bailiffs of the king of England, in the parts beyond sea, did the like as to the subjects of the king of France and their chattels, which were found in their respective bailiwicks. But shortly after, at the suggestion of his followers, the king of France gave orders that the subjects of

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