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corn, or other fruits of the earth. It was also agreed that all churches and ecclesiastical persons who, by the ravages of the said war, had been deprived of their property or incomes, everywhere throughout the territories of both kings, should have full compensation made them.

But, because the king of France wished that all those who had adhered to him or to the king of England should be included in the said truce, so as to receive molestation from neither of them, as also, that no one of those who had changed sides, should be subject to hostile proceedings, the truce was broken off. For the king of England was unwilling to violate the customs and laws of Poitou, or of any other of his territories, in which, from ancient times, it had been the custom of the nobles to settle their own disputes with the sword.

Accordingly, the matter being broken off, they all separated who had begun the said conference, and from that day the said kings became still more hostile, and with greater violence made attacks on each other with ravages and excessive conflagrations. The king of France came to the city of Evreux, and utterly destroyed it, and levelled its churches, sparing neither age nor sex, and carrying off the relics of the saints. This he did because the citizens of Evreux, having left him, had returned to their duty and allegiance to their lord the king of England. After the king of France, having destroyed the city of Evreux, was on his departure thence, and had appeared before a town called Freteval, the king of England came to Vendôme, to lie in wait for him; and, as that place was not surrounded by a wall, or suited for defence, the king ordered his tents to be pitched outside the town; and in them he awaited the approach of the king of France, who had sent him word that that day he would visit him with a hostile band, as unconcernedly as if he had been shut up within walls. The king of England joyously receiving his message, sent word back to him that he would wait for him, and, if he should not come, would pay

him visit on the following morning. On the king of France hearing this, he did not visit the king of England that day.

Accordingly, early next morning, the king of England ordered his troops to arm, and went forth for the purpose of engaging with the army of the king of France: on hearing of which, the king of France and his army fled before the face of the king of England, who pursued them; and, in the flight, many of the troops of the king of France were slain, and many

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taken prisoners. Vast treasure of the king of France was also taken, with the furniture of the king's chapel, and the papers of all the subjects of the king of England who had deserted him and become adherents of the king of France and earl John.

In the flight, however, the king of France left the multitude and entered a certain church, at a distance from the high road, for the purpose of hearing mass; but the king of England, not knowing that the king of France had concealed himself, still pursued his course, breathing forth threats and slaughter against the men of the king of France, and sought him, that he might either put him to death or take him alive.

Being informed by a certain Fleming that the king of France had now got to a considerable distance, the king of England was deceived thereby, and proceeded on a horse of the greatest swiftness a little beyond the territories of France and Normandy; on which his horse failing him, Marcadès, the chief of his Brabanters, gave him another horse. However, the king of England, not meeting with the king of France, returned to Vendôme with a vast amount of booty in prisoners, and horses, and large sums of money. After this, the king proceeded to Poitou, to attack Geoffrey de Rancon and the viscoụnt d'Angoulême, who had gone over to the king of France and earl John against him, and he defeated them: on which, he wrote to Hubert, archbishop of Canterbury, to the following

“Richard, by the grace of God, king of England, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and earl of Anjou, to the venerable father in Christ, Hubert, by the same grace, archbishop of Canterbury, primate of all England, greeting. Know that, by the grace of God, who in all things has consideration for the right, we have taken Tailleburge and Marcilliac, and all the castles and the whole of the territories of Geoffrey de Rancon, as also the city of Angoulême, and Neufchatel, Munciniac, La Chese, and all the other castles, and the whole of the territories of the viscount of Angoulême, with all things thereto appendant and appurtenant. The city of Angoulême and the borough we took in a single evening; while on the lands which we have captured in these parts, we have taken full three hundred knights and forty thousand armed men. Witness, myself, at Angoulême, on the twenty-second day of July.”

In the meantime, some members of the household of the king of France and of that of the king of England, by the

effect :

consent of both kings, met between Vernueil and Tiliers, for the purpose of a conference, in order to treat upon a truce between them; on which an agreement was made between them upon the terms hereafter stated. The Letter of Drogo and Anselm on the truce made between the

kings of France and England. “ Drogo de Merlot, constable of France, Anselm, dean of Saint Martin at Tours, and Ursin, chamberlain of our lord the king of France, to all to whom these present letters shall come, greeting. Know ye, that, by command of our lord Philip, king of France, we have made oath, and have, as his envoys, by our hand pledged our faith, that our lord the king of France shall observe the truce as here underwritten, and the covenants of the said truce.

Now, the said truce has been made on the following terms: Our lord the king of France, God so disposing him, at the prayers of the cardinal and of the abbat of Cisteux, grants to the king of England and his people a truce, and further grants that he may, if he shall be so disposed, fortify Nieubourg, Driencourt, Concas, and Breteuil. The other fortresses which were dismantled in the war, either by the king of France or by their own people, shall not be repaired during the time of this truce, unless it shall so happen that they are repaired during a peace which shall be made between the king of France and the king of England. The king of France and his people shall be in all respects in the same position as to their tenures in which they were on the day on which the truce was made. As to the Val Rodol, the following shall be the terms agreed on : The king of France shall hold the Val Rodol in such manner as he has hitherto done, that is to say, Rodol itself, and the whole of that town, with the churches; also Lovers, Aquigenere, Laire, and the other places as far as Haie Malherbe, and as far as Pont d'Arches. But from Haie Malherbe and beyond, and from Pont d'Arches and beyond, shall belong to the king of England.

Also, as to all the fortresses which the king of France shall hold on the day of this truce, it shall be agreed as follows: the king of France shall, during the continuance of the truce, fortify, or destroy, or burn the same if he shall think fit; and he shall be at liberty to act according to his will and pleasure as to all the lands which he holds. The king of England shall in like manner

or burn all the fortresses which he shall

'fortify, or destroy,

hold on the day of this truce; but the king of England shall not be at liberty to fortify any one of the fortresses that have been dismantled by the king of France or by his own people, with the exception of those four which have been mentioned above. Further, the king of France includes in this truce all those who before the war were more liegemen of himself than of the king of England; as also these [places] which were (held by] vassals of the king of England, whom we will here name: Arches, and Driencourt, as the king himself now holds the same and his people ; the county of Auge, as he now holds the same and his people; Mortemer, and the lands which William de Chahou holds; the lands of the earl of Boulogne, which he held on the day on which the truce was made; Hugh de Gournay, and Aumarle, and the feud of Beauvais and its lands, as he now holds the same ; Neumarche and the lands thereof, as William de Garland and his people now hold the same; Gisors, and Vexin, in Normandy, as the king of France and his people now hold the same; Vernon and Gal. lon, and the lands thereto belonging, as the king of France and his people now hold the same; Pascy and the lands thereto belonging, as the king and his people now hold the same; Ilers and Marcilliac, and the lands thereto belonging, as the king and his people now hold the same ; Loy and the lands thereto belonging, as the king and his people now hold the same; Novancourt and the lands thereto belonging, as the king, and earl Robert, and his people, now hold the same; Thiellerie and the lands thereto belonging, as the king, and Gervaise, and their people, now hold the same ; Nevelon and his people, and Fretteval and the lands thereto belonging, as they now hold the same; the count of Bruttie, and his people and lands, if he has any, as he now holds the same; the count of Angoulême, and his people, his lands, and his fee, as he now holds the same; also, John de Rouvere, Baldwin de Aquigny, and the count of Mellent, and his lands, as he now holds the same: both the lands aforesaid, as also the people that are upon them; and the said truce shall remain in force for one year from the feast of All Saints next ensuing. The king of France has mentioned all the persons aforesaid by name, because he wishes the king of England to mention by name those men of consequence whom he shall wish to be comprehended in the truce, within a period of fifteen days from the said truce : for if, after the fifteenth day from the said truce being made, he shall wish to name any, the king of France will decline to include them;

and if they shall confess that they have aided the king of Eng. land, they shall be included in the truce. All supporters of either side within fortified places shall also be included in the truce. The king of France has chosen two arbitrators, and, in like manner, the king of England two, by whose award, or by that of the greater part of them, if either of the kings shall take anything from the other, or any one of their subjects shall do so, reparation shall be made for the same within forty days therefrom. And the said arbitrators shall make oath on the holy Evangelists, that they will neither for love, hate, fear, nor reward, be guilty of any omission, but will with good faith make their award. And if it shall so happen that

any

seizure shall be made beyond the Loire, in the direction of Bourges, then the arbitrators shall meet between Exodun, and Chateau Raoul, for the purpose of compensation being made, and the arbitrators of the territory in which the seizure shall have been made shall summon the other arbitrators; and they, on hearing the summons, shall with good faith meet on fitting days at one of the places above named

; and if any seizure shall happen to be made on this side the Loire, in the direction of Normandy, then the arbitrators shall meet between Vernueil and Tiliers, for the purpose of compensation being made. And if there shall happen to be any misunderstanding between the arbitrators, then Master the legate of the highest standing, shall, with good faith and at peril of his soul, enquire into the truth thereof, and shall pronounce upon him who shall refuse to make satisfaction for the seizure and the offence, sentence of excommunication, all right of appeal being withdrawn, and shall place his lands under interdict. But if the evildoer shall belong to the territory of the king of France, then the king of France shall, in good faith, aid in obtaining reparation for the same, without any loss to himself; and the king of England shall do the same, in good faith, as to his subjects. If the king of France shall make any aggression upon the king of England, or the king of England upon the king of France, then the cardinal shall place an interdict upon the lands of the party making the aggression, if he shall refuse to make amends for such aggression, at the award of the arbitrators, or the major part of them. Richard, king of England, and his people, shall hold their lands on this side the Loire, towards Normandy, in the same manner in which they were holding them on the day

19 The legate of France or of Normandy.

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