The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and Notes, Original and Selected; Together with a Copious Glossary ...

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Página 597 - Cowards die many times before their deaths ; The valiant never taste of death but once. Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, It seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, Will come when it will come.
Página 305 - There is, betwixt that smile we would aspire to, That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin, More pangs and fears than wars or women have ; And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again.
Página 611 - When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff : Yet Brutus says, he was ambitious ; And Brutus is an honorable man.
Página 347 - In mere oppugnancy : The bounded waters Should lift their bosoms higher than the shores, And make a sop of all this solid globe : Strength should be lord of imbecility, And the rude son should strike his father dead : Force should be right ; or, rather, right and wrong (Between whose endless jar justice resides) Should lose their names, and so should justice too.
Página 163 - I, that am curtail'd of this fair proportion, Cheated of feature by dissembling nature, Deform'd, unfinish'd, sent before my time Into this breathing world, scarce half made up, And that so lamely and unfashionable That dogs bark at me as I halt by them; Why, I, in this weak piping time of peace, Have no delight to pass away the time, Unless to spy my shadow in the sun And descant on mine own deformity; And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover.
Página 246 - What, do I fear myself ? there's none else by : Richard loves Richard ; that is, I am I. Is there a murderer here ? No ; — yes, I am : Then fly. What, from myself? Great reason why, — Lest I revenge. What, myself upon myself ? Alack, I love myself. Wherefore ? for any good That I myself have done unto myself ? O, no ! alas, I rather hate myself For hateful deeds committed by myself ! 1 am a villain : yet I lie, I am not.
Página 113 - To kings, that fear their subjects' treachery ? O, yes it doth ; a thousand fold it doth. And to conclude, — the shepherd's homely curds, His cold thin drink out of his leather bottle, His wonted sleep under a fresh tree's shade, All which secure and sweetly he enjoys, Is far beyond a prince's delicates, His viands sparkling in a golden cup, His body couched in a curious bed, When care, mistrust, and treason wait on him.
Página 347 - And posts, like the commandment of a king, Sans check, to good and bad : But when the planets In evil mixture, to disorder wander, What plagues, and what portents ! what mutiny ! What raging of the sea ! shaking of earth ! Commotion in the winds ! frights, changes, horrors Divert and crack, rend and deracinate The unity and married calm of states Quite from their fixture...
Página 611 - Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest, (For Brutus is an honorable man ; So are they all, all honorable men,) Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral. He was my friend, faithful and just to me : But Brutus says he was ambitious ; And Brutus is an honorable man.
Página 614 - O, now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what! weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded ? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors.

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