The Story of the Heavens

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Sai ePublications, 29 dic. 2016 - 456 páginas
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Early Astronomical Observations—The Observatory of Tycho Brahe—The Pupil of the Eye—Vision of Faint Objects—The Telescope—The Object-Glass—Advantages of Large Telescopes—The Equatorial—The Observatory—The Power of a Telescope—Reflecting Telescopes—Lord Rosse's Great Reflector at Parsonstown—How the mighty Telescope is used—Instruments of Precision—The Meridian Circle—The Spider Lines—Delicacy of pointing a Telescope—Precautions necessary in making Observations—The Ideal Instrument and the Practical One—The Elimination of Error—Greenwich Observatory—The ordinary Opera-Glass as an Astronomical Instrument—The Great Bear—Counting the Stars in the Constellation—How to become an Observer.


The earliest rudiments of the Astronomical Observatory are as little known as the earliest discoveries in astronomy itself. Probably the first application of instrumental observation to the heavenly bodies consisted in the simple operation of measuring the shadow of a post cast by the sun at noonday. The variations in the length of this shadow enabled the primitive astronomers to investigate the apparent movements of the sun. But even in very early times special astronomical instruments were employed which possessed sufficient accuracy to add to the amount of astronomical knowledge, and displayed considerable ingenuity on the part of the designers.


Professor Newcomb[2] thus writes: "The leader was Tycho Brahe, who was born in 1546, three years after the death of Copernicus. His attention was first directed to the study of astronomy by an eclipse of the sun on August 21st, 1560, which was total in some parts of Europe. Astonished that such a phenomenon could be predicted, he devoted himself to a study of the methods of observation and calculation by which the prediction was made. In 1576 the King of Denmark founded the celebrated observatory of Uraniborg, at which Tycho spent twenty years assiduously engaged in observations of the positions of the heavenly bodies with the best instruments that could then be made. This was just before the invention of the telescope, so that the astronomer could not avail himself of that powerful instrument. Consequently, his observations were superseded by the improved ones of the centuries following, and their celebrity and importance are principally due to their having afforded Kepler the means of discovering his celebrated laws of planetary motion."


The direction of the telescope to the skies by Galileo gave a wonderful impulse to the study of the heavenly bodies. This extraordinary man is prominent in the history of astronomy, not alone for his connection with this supreme invention, but also for his achievements in the more abstract parts of astronomy. He was born at Pisa in 1564, and in 1609 the first telescope used for astronomical observation was constructed. Galileo died in 1642, the year in which Newton was born. It was Galileo who laid with solidity the foundations of that science of Dynamics, of which astronomy is the most splendid illustration; and it was he who, by promulgating the doctrines taught by Copernicus, incurred the wrath of the Inquisition.

 

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Índice

COVER IMAGE TITLE PAGE PREFACE TO ORIGINAL EDITION
NOTE TO THIS EDITION
THE ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORY
THE
THE MOON
THE SOLAR SYSTEM
THE LAW OF GRAVITATION
THE PLANET OF ROMANCE
NEPTUNE
COMETS
SHOOTING STARS
THE STARRY HEAVENS
THE DISTANTSUNS
DOUBLE STARS
THE DISTANCES OF THE STARS
STAR CLUSTERS AND NEBULÆ

MERCURY
VENUS
THE EARTH
MARS
THE MINOR PLANETS
JUPITER
SATURN
URANUS
THE PHYSICAL NATURE OF THE STARS
THE PRECESSION AND NUTATION OF THE EARTHS AXIS
THE ABERRATION OF LIGHT
THE ASTRONOMICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF HEAT
THE TIDES
APPENDIX ASTRONOMICAL QUANTITIES
FOOTNOTES

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