Robert E. Lee, Man and Soldier

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Scribner's Sons, 1911 - 734 páginas
 

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Página 62 - With all my devotion to the Union, and the feeling of loyalty and duty of an American citizen, I have not been able to make up my mind to raise my hand against my relatives, my children, my home.
Página 264 - I have heard, in such a way as to believe it, of your recently saying that both the army and the government needed a dictator. Of course it was not for this, but in spite of it, that I have given you the command. Only those generals who gain successes can set up dictators What I now ask of you is military success, and I will risk the dictatorship.
Página 574 - ... the officers to give their individual paroles not to take up arms against the Government of the United States until properly exchanged, and each company or regimental commander sign a like parole for the men of their commands. The arms, artillery, and public property to be parked and stacked, and turned over to the officers appointed by me to receive them. This will not embrace the side-arms of the officers, nor their private horses or baggage.
Página 682 - Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier, or not having been at sea." BOSWELL. " Lord Mansfield does not." JOHNSON. " Sir, if lord Mansfield were in a company of general officers and admirals who have been in service, he would shrink ; he'd wish to creep under the table.
Página 679 - My sword I give to Him that shall succeed me in my pilgrimage, and my courage and skill to him that can get it. My marks and scars I carry with me, to be a witness for me, that I have fought His battles who will now be my rewarder.
Página 635 - Yes, I know they will say hard things of us; they will not understand how we were overwhelmed by numbers; but that is not the question, Colonel; the question is, is it right to surrender this army? If it is right, then I will take all the responsibility.
Página 609 - ... He was a foe without hate; a friend without treachery; a soldier without cruelty; a victor without oppression; and a victim without murmuring. He was a public officer without vices; a private citizen without wrong; a neighbor without reproach; a Christian without hypocrisy; and a man without guile. He was Caesar without his ambition; Frederick without his tyranny; Napoleon without his selfishness; and Washington without his reward.
Página 577 - After four years of arduous service marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources. I need not tell the survivors of so many hard fought battles who have remained steadfast to the last that I have consented to this result from no distrust of them. But feeling that valor and devotion could accomplish nothing that could compensate for the loss that...
Página 637 - And from the heights the thunder pealed. Then at the brief command of Lee Moved out that matchless infantry, With Pickett leading grandly down, To rush against the roaring crown Of those dread heights of destiny. Far heard above the angry guns A cry across the tumult runs, — The voice that rang through Shiloh's woods And Chickamauga's solitudes, The fierce South cheering on her sons ! Ah, how the withering tempest blew Against the front of Pettigrew!
Página 578 - By the terms of the agreement, Officers and men can return to their homes and remain until exchanged. You will take with you the satisfaction that proceeds from the consciousness of duty faithfully performed, and I earnestly pray that a merciful God will extend to you His blessing and protection.

Sobre el autor (1911)

Thomas Nelson Page was born on April 23, 1853 at Oakland, the family plantation in Hanover County, Virginia. He attended Washington College (now Washington and Lee) but left before he completed his degree. He later attended the University of Pennsylvania as a law student for a year and eventually received his law degree from the University of Virginia. He became a lawyer, a practice he eventually gave up to become a writer. In 1913, he was appointed by President Woodrow Wilson as Ambassador to Italy where he served six years. The primary setting for his works was his home state, Virginia. His titles include "In Ole Virginia," "Old South," "Red Riders," "Negro, the Southerners" and "Social Life in Virginia." He died on November 1, 1922 in Virginia.

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