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guage of Goldsmith himself, in reviewing a collection of pieces, by Montesquieu, put forth under similar circumstances,” is strikingly applicable:– “There is,” he says, “a pleasure arising from the perusal of the very bagatelles of men renowned for their knowledge and genius; and we

receive with veneration those pieces after they are dead,

which would lessen them in our estimation while living : sensible that we shall. enjoy them no more, we treasure up,

as precious relics, every saying and word that has escaped

them ; but their writings, of every kind, we deem inestimable. Cicero observes, that we behold with transport and enthusiasm the little barren spot, or ruins of a house, in which a person celebrated for his wisdom, his valour, or his learning, lived. When he coasted along the shores of Greece, all the heroes, statesmen, orators, philosophers, and poets of those famed republics, rose in his memory, and were present to his sight: how much more would he have been delighted with any of their posthumous works, however inferior to what he had before seen "

Both the old and the new materials are accompanied with brief notes, clearing up the local and temporary allusions in which they abound; but which the lapse of another generation would probably have rendered it impossible for any diligence to explain.

February, 1837.

* See Vol. iii. p. 486.

No. f.A gre

iv. On the Uncertainty of Literary Success............... 56

Bidderman the Wise; a Flemish Tradition ......... 6l

On the Sagacity of the Spider ..................... ... 65

X: The Characteristics of Greatness........................ 70

v. Upon Political Frugality...................... -- - - - - - - - - - 73

The Fame Machine; a Reverie........................ 83

A Word or Two on the Farce called “High Life

Below Stairs” .......................................... 90

Upon Unfortunate Merit................................. 92

* v1. On Education ............................................. 95

On the Instability of Worldly Grandeur ........... 107

Some Account of the Academies of Italy ............ 1 11

vii. Of Eloquence—and the Pulpit ........................ 113

* Custom and Laws compared ........................... 123

On the Pride and Luxury of the Middling Class of

People ................................................... 126

*Salinus and Olinda....................................... 128

* The Sentiments of a Frenchman on the Temper of

the English ............................................. 131

viii. On Deceit and Falsehood................................. 134

The Augustan Age of England ........................ 140

X Of the Opera in England ....... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 149

ESSAYS.

Essay

PREFACE ............................ .......... ------------ 155

1. On the Clubs of London ................................. 158

11. On Public Rejoicings for Victory. [Now first

collected.]................................................ 167

So 111. On the different Schools of Music .......... - - - - - - - - - - - 173

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AN ENOUIRY INTO THE PRESENT STATE

OF POLITE LEARNING IN EUROPE. "

CHAP.

1. INTRoduction ........ ---------- ---------- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 387

11. The Causes which contribute to the decline of Learn-

ing ................ ------------ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 389

111. A View of the Obscure Ages............. - - - - - - - - - ..... 397

A Parallel between the Rise and Decline of Ancient

and Modern Learning. [Now first collected.]... 401

iv. On the Present State of Polite Learning in Italy... 402

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