Charles Bell and the Anatomy of Reform

Portada
University of Chicago Press, 17 nov. 2015 - 232 páginas
Sir Charles Bell (1774–1842) was a medical reformer in a great age of reform—an occasional and reluctant vivisectionist, a theistic popularizer of natural science, a Fellow of the Royal Society, a surgeon, an artist, and a teacher. He was among the last of a generation of medical men who strove to fashion a particularly British science of medicine; who formed their careers, their research, and their publications through the private classrooms of nineteenth-century London; and whose politics were shaped by the exigencies of developing a living through patronage in a time when careers in medical science simply did not exist. A decade after Bell’s death, that world was gone, replaced by professionalism, standardized education, and regular career paths.

In Charles Bell and the Anatomy of Reform, Carin Berkowitz takes readers into Bell’s world, helping us understand the life of medicine before the modern separation of classroom, laboratory, and clinic. Through Bell’s story, we witness the age when modern medical science, with its practical universities, set curricula, and medical professionals, was born.
 

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

No hemos encontrado ninguna reseña en los sitios habituales.

Índice

Introduction
1
Building a Career in Londons Medical Classrooms
14
Training the Hand and Eye to Know
44
Journals and the Making of British Medicine in Early NineteenthCentury London
76
London University and the Middlesex Hospital School
103
Changes in British Medical Culture and the Priority Dispute over the Discovery of the Roots of Motor and Sensory Nerves
130
Epilogue
165
Acknowledgments
173
Notes
175
Bibliography
203
Index
217
Página de créditos

Otras ediciones - Ver todo

Términos y frases comunes

Sobre el autor (2015)

Carin Berkowitz is director of the Beckman Center for the History of Chemistry at the Chemical Heritage Foundation. She lives in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania.

Información bibliográfica