The British Palladium: Or, Annual Miscellany of Literature and Science for the Year ..., Volumen 8

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D. Steel., 1758
 

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Página 15 - We know him only by his most wise and excellent contrivances of things, and final causes. We admire him for his perfections, but we reverence and adore him on account of his dominion ; for we adore him as his servants, and a god without dominion, providence, and final causes is nothing else but Fate and Nature.
Página 13 - And from his true dominion it follows that the true God is a living, intelligent, and powerful Being; and from his other perfections, that he is supreme, or most perfect. He is eternal and infinite, omnipotent and omniscient; that is, his duration reaches from eternity to eternity; his presence from infinity to infinity; he governs all things, and knows all things that are or can be done.
Página 14 - He is all similar, all eye, all ear, all brain, all arm, all power to perceive, to understand, and to act ; but in a manner not at all human, in a manner not at all corporeal, in a manner utterly unknown to us.
Página 12 - ... planets; but it is not to be conceived that mere mechanical causes could give birth to so many regular motions, since the comets range over all parts of the heavens in 'very eccentric orbits...
Página 14 - Every soul that has perception is, though in different times and in different organs of sense and motion, still the same indivisible person. There are given successive parts in duration, coexistent parts in space, but neither the one nor the other in the person of a man, or his thinking principle; and much less can they be found in the thinking substance of God. Every man, so far as he is a thing that has perception, is one and the same man during his whole life, in all and each of his organs of...
Página 16 - ... even so very hard as never to wear or break in pieces ; no ordinary power being able to divide what God himself made one, in the first creation. While the particles continue entire, they may compose bodies of one and the same nature and texture in all ages ; but should they wear away or break in pieces, the nature of things depending on them would be changed.
Página 13 - God is a relative word, and has a respect to servants; and Deity is the dominion of God not over his own body, as those imagine who fancy God to be the soul of the world, but over servants.
Página 12 - The six primary planets are revolved about the Sun in circles concentric with the Sun, and with motions directed towards the same parts and almost in the same plane. Ten moons are revolved about the Earth, Jupiter and Saturn, in circles concentric with them, with the same direction of motion, and nearly in the planes of the orbits of those planets. But it is not to be conceived that mere mechanical causes...
Página 15 - ... we admire him for his perfections; but we reverence and adore him on account of his dominion: for we adore him as his servants; and a god without dominion, providence, and final causes, is nothing else but Fate and Nature. Blind metaphysical necessity, which is certainly the same always and every where, could produce no variety of things. All that diversity of natural things which we find suited to different times and places could arise from nothing but the ideas and will of a Being necessarily...
Página 13 - And if the fixed stars are the centres of other like systems, these, being formed by the like wise counsel, must be all subject to the dominion of One...

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