Passages from the Life of a Philosopher

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Cambridge University Press, 12 oct. 2011 - 516 páginas
The mathematician and engineer Charles Babbage (1791-1871) is best remembered for his 'calculating machines', which are considered the forerunner of modern computers. Over the course of his life he wrote a number of books based on his scientific investigations, but in this volume, published in 1864, Babbage writes in a more personal vein. He points out at the beginning of the work that it 'does not aspire to the name of autobiography', though the chapters sketch out the contours of his life, beginning with his family, his childhood and formative years studying at Cambridge, and moving through various episodes in his scientific career. However, the work also diverges into his observations on other topics, as indicated by chapter titles such as 'Street Nuisances' and 'Wit'. Babbage's colourful recollections give an intimate portrait of the life of one of Britain's most influential inventors.
 

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Reseña de usuario  - porges - www.librarything.com

Delightful chapters interspersed with some gnatterings about local body politics. Leer reseña completa

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A decent book, but nothing too out of the ordinary. I was not wowed or surprised by any of its contents. Nevertheless, not bad. Leer reseña completa

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Índice

CHAPTER
1
CHAPTER II
7
CHAPTER IV
25
CHAPTER V
41
CONTENTS
54
CHAPTER VI
68
CHAPTER VII
97
CHAPTER VIII
112
CHAPTER XXI
259
CHAPTER XXII
276
CHAPTER XXIII
292
CHAPTER XXIV
298
CHAPTER XXV
313
CHAPTER XXVI
337
CHAPTER XXVII
363
CHAPTER XXVIII
371

CHAPTER IX
142
CHAPTER XI
168
CHAPTER XIII
186
CHAPTER XIV
195
CHAPTER XV
205
CHAPTER XVI
213
CHAPTER XVII
228
CHAPTER XIX
242
CHAPTER XX
251
CHAPTER XXIX
387
CHAPTER XXX
396
CHAPTER XXXI
406
AV1s1oN 406
421
THE AurHons CONTRIBUTIONS T0 HUMAN KNOWLEDGE
430
CHAPTER XXXIV
441
RESULTS or Scmucz s
473
CHAPTER XXXVI
482
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Sobre el autor (2011)

Mathematician, inventor, and prolific writer, Charles Babbage is best known for his conception of the first automatic digital computer. He was born in England in 1791 and educated in mathematics at Cambridge University. Babbage helped found the British Analytical Society, which aimed at incorporating European developments into English mathematics. From the time he was a student, Babbage was drawn to the idea of mechanizing the production of values in mathematical tables. His difference engine of 1822 was to be an all-purpose calculating machine. Although he received government funding to build a large-scale working model of the difference engine, the project never was completed. By 1834 he had developed his ideas for an analytical engine, a computing device consisting of a processing area of wheels and racks, called a mill, for the calculation of decimals. Borrowing the idea of the punch card from the Jacquard mill, he proposed the use of separate card sets, one for controlling procedures and one for storing information that would make the engine "programmable." Lady Lovelace, the daughter of Lord Byron might have contributed some programming ideas. P Babbage's analytic engine was never successfully built. Although his design was forgotten until his unpublished notebooks were discovered in 1937, his intellectual distinction is that he was the first person to plan a flexible modern mechanical computing device.

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