The Classical Journal, Volumen 20

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A. J. Valpay., 1819

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Página 131 - To idols foul. Thammuz came next behind, Whose annual wound in Lebanon allured The Syrian damsels to lament his fate In amorous ditties all a summer's day ; While smooth Adonis from his native rock Ran purple to the sea, supposed with blood Of Thammuz yearly wounded : the love-tale Infected Sion's daughters with like heat; Whose wanton passions in the sacred porch Ezekiel saw, when, by the vision led, His eye survey'd the dark idolatries Of alienated Judah.
Página 378 - ... seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world : all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power : both Angels and Men, and creatures of what condition soever, though each in different sort and manner, yet all, with uniform consent, admiring her as the Mother of their peace and joy.
Página 178 - David will I lay upon his shoulder ; so he shall open, and none shall shut ; and he shall shut, and none shall open.
Página 378 - Of Law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world : all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power : both Angels and Men, and creatures of what condition soever, though each in different sort and manner, yet all, with uniform consent, admiring her as the Mother of their peace and joy.
Página 351 - Methinks I see in my mind a noble and puissant nation rousing herself like a strong man after sleep, and shaking her invincible locks : Methinks I see her as an eagle mewing her mighty youth, and kindling her undazzled eyes at the full mid-day beam...
Página 351 - I see in my mind a noble and puissant nation rousing herself like a strong man after sleep, and shaking her invincible locks : methinks I see her as an eagle, mewing her mighty youth, and kindling her undazzled eyes at the full mid-day beam, — purging and unsealing her long-abused sight at the fountain itself of heavenly radiance, while the whole noise of timorous and flocking birds, with those also that love the twilight, flutter about, amazed at what she means, and in their envious gabble would...
Página 17 - Praeneste relegi ; Qui, quid sit pulchrum, quid turpe, quid utile, quid non, Plenius ac melius Chrysippo et Crantore dicit.
Página 57 - Only be sure that thou eat not the blood: for the blood is the life; and thou mayest not eat the life with the flesh.
Página 56 - Every moving thing that liveth shall be meat for you : even as the green herb have I given you all things : But flesh with the life thereof, which is the blood thereof, shall you not eat.
Página 372 - mid Turan's mountain-snows, Pure as his source, awhile young Ganges flows ; Through flowery meads his loitering way pursues, And quaffs with gentle lip the nectar'd dews; Till, swoln by many a tributary tide, His waters wash some tall pagoda's side : Then broad and rough, 'mid rocks unknown to day, Through tangled woods where tigers howl for prey, He foams along; and, rushing to the main, Drinks deep pollution from each tainted plain.

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