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Rice bought in Charleston at the following prices, will stand in at Havre, at the rate

of exchange on Paris of f. 5 5 05 5 10 5 15 5 20 5 25 5 30 5 35 5 40 cts 2 f. 18 37|f. 18 50 f. 18 63 f. 18 77 f. 18 90 f. 19 03|f. 19 17 f. 19 30 f. 19 43

23 21 45 21 61 21 78 21 94 22 10 22 27 22 44 22 60 22 76 3 24 53 24 73 24 92 25 12 25 31 25 51 25 70 25 90 26 09 3 27 61 27 84 28 07 28 29 28 52 28 74 28 97 29 19

29 42 4 30 70 30 95 31 21 31 46 31 72 31 98 32 23 32 49

32 75 41 33 78 34 07 34 35 34 64 34 93 35 21 35 50 35 79 36 07

5 36 86 37 18 37 50 37 81 38 13 38 45 38 77 39 09 39 40 each ct. 1 54

1 56 1 57 1 59 1 60 1 62 1 63 1 65 1 66

Corresponding prices at Havre. fs. 22 ct. 2 59 ct. 2 56 ct. 2 54 ct.2 51 ct. 2 48 ct. 2 46 ct. 2 43 ct. 2 41 ct. 2 39 23 2 75 2 72 2 69

2 67 2 64 2 61 2 59 2 56 2 54 24 2 91 2 88 2 85 2 82 2 79 2 77 2 74

2 71

2 69 25 3 071 3 04 3 01 2 98 2 95 2 92 2 89 2 861 2 84 26 3 24 3 20 3 17 3 14 3 11 3 08 3 05 3 02 2 99 27 3 40 3 36 3 33 3 30 3 26 3 23 3 20 3 17 3 14 28 3 56 3 53 3 49 3 45 3 42 3 39 3 35

3 32 3 29 29 3 72 3 69 3 65 361 3 57 3 54 3 51

3 47 3 44 30 3 89 3 85 3 81 3 77 3 73 3 69 3 66

3 62 3 59 31 4 05 4,01

3 97 3 92 3 88 3 85 3 81 3 77 3 74 32

4 21 4 17 4 13 4 081 4 04 4 00 3 96 3 93 3 89 33

4 37 4 33 4 28 4 24 4 20 4 15 4 12 4 08 4 04 34 4 54 4 49 4 44 4 40 4 35 4 31 4 27 4 23 4 19 35 4 70 4 65 4 60 4 55 4 51

4 46 4 42 4 38 4 34 36 4 86 4 81

4 76 4 71 4 67 4 62 4 58 4 53 4 49 each f. 1 08] 08 081 08 08! 08 08 08 08 The freight is calculated at $3 per 600 lb. For every dollar more, add f. 1 06.

Rice bought at Charleston at the following prices, will stand in at Antwerp, at the

Exchange on Paris, ....... fs. 5 00 f. 5 05 f. 5 10 f. 5 151 f. 5 20 f. 5 25/ f. 5 301 f. 5 35 f. 5 40 Amsterdam ct.42.33 ct.41.91 ct.41.50 ct.41.10 ct.40.70 ct.40.31 ct.39.91ct.39.56 ct.39.19 London,.... $ 5 08 $ 5 03 $ 4 98 $ 4 93 $4 88} $4 837 $4 794 $4 744 $4 703

or pr. ct. 114.3 113 1-6 112 111 109] 108 107 4.5 106 4-5 105 4-5

ct. 2 A.8 15 8.8 21 A.8 28 4.8 34 A. 8 40 A. 8 46 11.8 53 A.8 59 A. 8 65 23 9 61 9 69

9 77 9 84 9 92 10 00 10 08 10 15 10 23 3 11 07 11 16 11 26 11 35 11 44 11 53 11 62 11 71 11 81 31 12 53 12 64 12 74 12 85 12 96 13 06 13 17 13 13 38

13 99 14 11 14 23 14 36 14 48 14 60 14 72 14 84 14 96 44 15 45 15 59 15 72 15 86

15 99 16 13 16 27 16 40 16 54 5 16 91 17 06 17 21 17 36 17 51 17 66 17 81 17 96 18 11 each 1 73 74 74 75 76 77

781 Corresponding prices at Antwerp. A. 9 ct. 2 29ct. 2 27 ct. 2 24/ct. 2 22ct. 2 20 ct. 2 17 ct. 2 15 ct.2 13 ct. 2 11

10 2 63 2 60 2 58 2 55 2 52 2 50 2 47 2 45 2 43 11 2 98 2 94 2 91 2 88 2 85 2 83 2 80 2 77 2 74 12 3 32 3 28 3 25 3 22 3 18 3 15 3 12

3 09 3 06 13 3 66 3 62 3 59 3 55 3 51 3 48 3 44 3 41 3 38 14 4 00 3 96 3 92 3 88 3 84 3 81 3 77 3 73 3 70 15 4 35 4 30

4 26 4 21 4 17 4 13 4 09 4 05 4 01 16 4 69

4 64 4 59 4 55 4 50 4 46 4 41 4 37 4 33 17 5 03

4 98 4 93 4 88 4 83 4 78 4 74 4 69 4 65 18 5 37 5 32 5 26 5 21 5 16 5 11 5 06 5 01 4 96 each

17 17 17 17 16 16 16 16 16

091 09 08. 081 08 08 08 08 08 The above is calculated at the freight of $3 per 600 lb. For every dollar more, add 6.-250 to the above cost at Antwerp.

REMARKS ON THE FOREGOING Tables. They are calculated upon the preceding Proforma Accounts, including all charges, except commission and guarantee at the place of sale.

The first part shows the cost at Havre or Antwerp, at a given price and rate of ex. change at Charleston. The second gives the corresponding value of prices quoted in the same European markets, and instruct us how much may be paid in Charleston to make the rice stand in, at the said quotation, or how much the same will nett.

In the tables for Antwerp, it will be found whether it is more profilable to draw on London, Paris, or Amsterdam. In the first case, the exchange between London and Antwerp is reckoned at the fixed rate of A. 12 per £; and in the second, fi.474 are taken for fs. 100.

To avoid the repetition of fractions, the last line gives the amount to be added to the cost, for each fractional part, enabling the reader to find the cost for any price what. ever. As, for instance, rice bought at Charleston at 3f cents, exchange fs. 5 20. It will cost in Havre at 3f cents, according to the table,.....

fs. 28 51 Add for ļ cent. one half of =f. 1 60,.....

80

Total,.........

f. 29 31 And supposing the freight to be $34 per 600 lbs., add...

53 per 50 k., ......

f. 29 84 To find the corresponding value of fs. 30 25, exchange fs. 5 10, Take for fs. 30,.........

cts. 3 81 , cts. 3 85—price which may be paid in ind the proportion for 25 cent.,

04 )

Charleston.

COMMERCIAL REGULATIONS.

TO GUIDE OWNERS AND CAPTAINS OF VESSELS BOUND TO THE

BRAZILIAN PORTS.
To despatch a vessel at the office of the Consulate of Brazil, are necessary :
'Three copies of the manifest, one certified at the customhouse.
The invoice of all, and every shipper.
Bills of lading
Bill of health.
List of crew; and passengers, if any, must take passports.

It is also necessary to give three days' notice at the consulate, of the intended de parture of vessels, for any port in Brazil.

Art. 146. The master of any vessel sailing with a cargo for any of the Brazilian ports, ought to bring two copies of his manifest, exactly alike, which must contain:

Sec. 1. The name, description, and tonnage of the vessel.
Sec. 2. The master's name, with the date at the end, and his signature.
Sec. 3. The port where he took the cargo, stated in the manifest.
Sec. 4. The port or ports said cargo is bound to.

Sec. 5. The marks, countermarks, number of packages, and their descriptions, such as bales, boxes, chests, pipes, half pipes, barrels, tierces, &c.

Sec. 6. A declaration of the quantity and quality of the merchandise in each pack. age as near as possible, or of several homogeneous packages with the same mark, and of the goods stowed loose.

Sec. 7. The names of the shippers and consignees, or whether they are to order. Every thing must be written in words at length, except the numbers of the packages, and on entire sheets of paper not pieced to one another.

Art. 147. When a vessel has taken cargo at more than one port, she ought to bring a manifest from each one of the ports whereat she may have received shipment.

Art. 148. At the end of the manifests, the master shall state the number of passen gers, both cabin and steerage ones, and make all other declarations he may deem re

quisite for his safety and good faith, even acknowledging any packages that may be short of, or over and above the manifest, accounting for such deficiency or excess, under the certainty, that nothing of what he may afterwards allege shall release him from responsibility: nor shall he stand exonerated by means of the vague declarations usu ally made of not being answerable for deficiency or difference.

Art. 149. At the time of the visit, the master shall hand to the Guardamor a list of the baggage belonging to the private use of each passenger, every list being signed by its owner, in order that by this list, the discharge may be effected at the customhouse, and the delivery of what' be free of duty may be granted after the examination made by the competent officers, in virtue of an order from the collector; said lists returning to the Mesa Grande, (collector's table,) to be examined and laid by. If the baggage belong to colonists or emigrants coming to settle in the country, the examination there. of shall be made on board.

Art. 150. As soon as the master of any vessel bound for the ports of the Brazilian Empire shall have completed his shipment at the port or ports he is to sail from, and made up the manifest in the manner directed by Art. 146, he is to produce the copies of said manifest to the Brazilian consul residing at such port, or to his deputy, that he may certify, should they contain the declarations and formalities required by these regulations, numbering and signing all their leaves, drawing a dash on the blanks, that nothing else may be thereto added, and certifying at the end that such manifest is in due form, without erasures, interlineations or corrections, nor any thing that may create a doubt as to its clear purport; after which he will deliver them to the master of the vessel, one copy open, and the other put up in a letter closed and sealed with the consular seal, and directed to the collector of the customhouse, 'at the port where such vessel is bound to.

Art. 151. In those ports where there is no Brazilian consul, or any person acting as such, the manifest shall be certified and closed by two Brazilian merchants therein residing, and in default of them, by two merchants of the country; and the signatures buth of the latter and of the former, must be authenticated by the proper local authority.

Art. 152. If the manifest which the master has to produce certified by the Brazilian consul, or the person who has acted as such, contain any defect or irregularity which he ought to have prevented or caused to be corrected before setting to it the certificate, he alone shall be responsible for it, and not the master of the vessel.

Art. 153. But if it be found out that the defect or irregularity was committed subsequently to the consul's approval, the guilt shall fall on the master; the same will be the case if the manifest shall have been certified by Brazilian or foreign merchants, whether the defect or irregularity be known to have preceded or followed the approbation.

Art. 154. If it happen that a ship or vessel proceeding with a destination and mani. fest for any one port of the empire, lands at a foreign port a part of her cargo included in the manifest, the master is to bring from that port a manifest in duplicate of the goods unladen, accompanied with the same forms prescribed in the foregoing articles. When the discharge be made at a Brazilian port, and the remainder of the cargo be carried on to another Brazilian port, the customhouse shall furnish the master with such certificates as will prove the discharge at the port to which he directs his course.

Art. 155. Wherein it be ascertained that the vessel brought a greater quantity of merchandise than what appears from the manifest, and the declaration thereto added by the master, such merchandise as may be found over and above that quantity shall be seized and distributed among the captors, the master paying to the national treasury a fine equal to one half the value thereof, and the captors paying the usual duties.

Art. 156. If less quantity of goods be found than what is shown by the manifest, and the declaration thereto added by the master, the missing goods shall be deemed as concealed or removed, and the master shall forfeit the value thereof for the benefit of those who may discover the deficiency, and half the value as a fine to the national treasury; and these condemnations will take place by the mere fact of the discovery of an excess or deficiency, although the concealment or removal of the goods may not otherwise be proved. But the dispositions of this and the other article only apply to such goods as can be counted in the act of their being received on board, for with regard to those which come in boxes, or in bales, the master is only answerable for the excess and deficiencies of packages. On bulky goods which are cleared by measure or weight, and which are liable to waste or increase, as salt jerk beef, &c., the penalty of this and the preceding article, shall not be imposed, except on the differences of 5 pes cent. more or less than what is shown by the manifest.

Art. 157. For every difference in the quality of the package, or in the mark, the master is to pay two mil reis fine, although in every thing else the discharge should agree with the manifest.

Art. 158. A vessel departing in ballast from a foreign port, bound to some one of the Brazilian ports, shall bring a certificate so to prove it, drawn up in the same form, and with the like authenticity as the manifests; and if the departure be from a Brazilian port, she must bring a certificate from the customhouse, under penalty of paying in either case a fine of from 100 to 500 mil reis.

Art. 159. Any master of vessel who shall fail to bring the manifest and certificates in the manner specified in this chapter, or who shall bring operi the copy of the mani. fest received by bim closed up, shall pay a fine of from 100 to 1000 mil reis, at the judgment of the collector, according to the quality of the misdemeanor, and regard be. ing had to the amount of the cargo; and only after payment of the forfeiture shall he be admitted to effect the unloading. In case of bringing a single copy of the manifest, he shall forfeit 50 mil reis. Vessels coming from fishing voyages, are excepted with regard to the produce thereof, as they are not obliged to bring a manifest.

Art. 160. Should the master come without a manifest, the vessel shall be admitted to unload, by paying a fine of four mil reis for every ton of her admeasurement.

Art. 161. The vessel remains mortgaged to the payment of the fines imposed on the master by these regulations, and shall not be released to leave the port, without the fine or fines being first paid, or the necessary sum deposited for the purpose.

Vessels sailing from the aforesaid ports one month after such publication, shall remain subject to the herein above mentioned dispositions.

Those consuls and vice-consuls who shall fail to comply with the injunctions contained in the present chapters, shall be liable, for the first time, to a fine of from 100 to 500 mil reis, to be imposed upon them by the Treasury court, (Tribunal do Thesouro,) and in case of relapsing, they shall be dismissed from office.

Consulate General of the Empire of Brazil,

DIONIZIO DE AZEVEDO PECANHA. New York, 1840.

QUARANTINE REGULATIONS AT CADIZ. The following copy of a decree has been received at Lloyd's from the British Con. sul at Cadiz:-

“ The Provisional Board of Health, on the 1st of this month, communicates to the Board of Trade as follows:

• • In consequence of there being in the Lazzaretto at Malta, under quarantine, an English vessel from Alexandria, attacked by the plague, the Supreme Board of Health has commanded, by an order dated the 22d of May last, which I have just received, that all vessels arriving in our ports from that island shall be considered as having unclean bills of health, so long as the abovementioned vessel shall continue in that state ; which, with the concurrence of the said Board of Trade, is hereby made public, for the information and government of the mercantile community:

“JOSE MARIA AGUAYO, • JUNE 6, 1840.

“ Accountant Secretary."

TO SUBSCRIBERS. Extract of a Circular from the Postmaster General. “ Postmasters may enclose money in a letter to the publisher of a newspaper, (or magazine,) to pay the subscription of a third person, and frank the letter if written by himself.”

Some subscribers may not be aware of the above regulations. It will be seen, that by requesting the postmaster where they reside, to frank their letters containing subscription money, he will do so upon being satis. fied that the letter contains nothing but what refers to the subscription.

HUNT'S

MERCHANTS MAGAZINE.

OCTOBER, 1840.

ART. I.-RAILROADS OF THE UNITED STATES.

Were it to be asked, what is the most distinguishing feature which marks our republic, a ready answer might be given :—it is the productive enter. prise of the people. Within the period of a little more than half a century of self-government, what monuments has it erected around us ! We have in. deed no gorgeous temples and gigantic pyramids, no crumbling halls of paintings and statues dim with age, the work of our own hands, no cata. combs, the burial places of kings, the date of whose erection is lost in the lapse of ages, and through whose winding labyrinths the hyena prowls, and the bat flits in the darkness. But we have, under the fostering hand of the local governments of our most important states and individual enterprise, dug through plains, hills, and solid rocks, in our long lines of canals and railroads, works that have stamped upon the soil a lasting impression, which, if the republic were swept away, and all records of its existence blotted out forever, would be viewed by posterity with the same wonder with which we now gaze upon the mouldering ruins of Rome, the marble tem. ples of the Acropolis, the pyramids of Egypt, and the track of the Appian way.

In order to judge of the advantages to the republic, of land and water communication by steam, we need only to look back at the condition of the country in this respect before that agent was introduced. We had at that time the same spirit of enterprise, the same power of production, the same wide agricultural and mineral territory, the same large cities, acting as places of deposit and shipment, as well as the feeders for the interior, the same rivers and lakes, coursing like the veins of the human system through the whole frame of the country; but what advantages did they then pre. sent, compared with those which they now afford? The vessels which were accustomed to ply from port to port in the interior, locked up by ice a con. siderable portion of the year, even when navigation was free, were dependent upon the capricious chances of the wind, and although carrying valuable freights, which were required to be brought rapidly into market, were obliged VOL. III.-NO. IK

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