Travels of Anacharsis the Younger in Greece: During the Middle of the Fourth Century Before the Christian Æra, Volumen 4

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G. G. and J. Robinson, 1796

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Página 27 - And roll the darkening waves, my father slew me, A victim to Diana, so he thought, For Helen's sake, its bay where Aulis winds, To fame well known; for there his thousand ships...
Página 6 - The first of these writers has been censured for having admitted mute characters into his drama. " Achilles after the death of his friend, and Niobe after the destruction of her children, appear on the stage, and remain during several scenes motionless...
Página 3 - ... already known. The hymns in honour of Bacchus, while they described his rapid progress and splendid conquests, became imitative ; and in the contests of the Pythian games, the players on the flute who entered into competition were enjoined by an express law to represent successively the circumstances that had preceded, accompanied, and followed the victory of Apollo over Python. Some years after this regulation...
Página 9 - I gor'd him with a wound; a grateful present To the stern god, that in the realms below Reigns o'er the dead: there let him take his seat. He lay: and spouting from his wounds a stream Of blood, bedew'd me with these crimson drops. I glory in them, like the genial earth, When the warm showers of...
Página 454 - All who have meditated on the art of governing mankind have been convinced that the fate of empires depends on the education of youth.
Página 253 - The priefts, after having examined the entrails of the victims, declared that the gods approved the marriage. To conclude the ceremonies, we proceeded to the Artemifium, where the lovers depofited each a lock of their hair on the tomb of the laft Theori of the Hyperboreans.
Página 6 - Niobe after the destruction of her children, appear on the stage, and remain during several scenes motionless, their heads covered with a veil and without uttering a word ; but if their eyes had overflown with tears, and they had poured forth the bitterest lamentations, could they have produced an effect so terrible as this veil, this silence, and...
Página 21 - ... painted men greater than they can be, Sophocles as they ought to be, and Euripides as they are.
Página 38 - Ilegemori proposed to break off the piece abruptly; but the Athenians, without removing from their places, covered themselves with their cloaks, and, after having paid the tribute of a few tears to their relatives who had fallen in...
Página 362 - Cnof'us, and adduce, as the principal fupport of this opinion, the coins of that city, which reprefent the plan of it, according as the arii ils conceived it.

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