When Memory Comes

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Univ of Wisconsin Press, 2003 - 185 páginas
Four months before Hitler came to power, Saul Friedländer was born in Prague to a middle-class Jewish family . In 1939, seven-year-old Saul and his family were forced to flee to France, where they lived through the German Occupation, until his parents' ill-fated attempt to flee to Switzerland. They were able to hide their son in a Roman Catholic seminary before being sent to Auschwitz where they were killed. After an imposed religious conversion, young Saul began training for priesthood. The birth of Israel prompted his discovery of his Jewish past and his true identity. Friedländer brings his story movingly to life, shifting between his Israeli present and his European past with grace and restraint. His keen eye spares nothing, not even himself, as he explores the ways in which the loss of his parents, his conversion to Catholicism, and his deep-seated Jewish roots combined to shape him into the man he is today. Friedländer's retrospective view of his journey of grief and self-discovery provides readers with a rare experience: a memoir of feeling with intellectual backbone.

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Índice

Sección 1
10
Sección 2
37
Sección 3
64
Sección 4
97
Sección 5
102
Sección 6
118
Sección 7
128
Sección 8
134
Sección 9
155
Sección 10
157
Sección 11
167
Sección 12
170
Sección 13
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Sobre el autor (2003)

Saul Friedländer is the author of many books, including Nazi Germany and the Jews, History and Psychoanalysis, and Memory, History, and the Extermination of the Jews of Europe. A recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Award, he is retired from professorships at Tel Aviv University and the University of Geneva and currently holds the 1939 Club Chair at the University of California, Los Angeles.

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