Case Studies in Diversity: Refugees in America in the 1990s

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David W. Haines
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1997 - 308 páginas

This text introduces students to the main groups of refugees in America. Divided into political, sociological, anthropological, and historical approaches, the book discusses the peoples themselves as well as their impact on American society. Refugees are a special category of people who are admitted to this country for humanitarian reasons, have suffered greatly before getting here, and are resettled through an impressive combination of public and private resources. This book traces each group through the process and assesses their future prospects.

 

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Índice

Cubans
15
Vietnamese
34
Soviet Jews
59
Iranians
85
Lao
107
Afghans
127
Hmong
145
Khmer
167
Eastern Europeans
197
Chinese from Southeast Asia
223
Haitians
244
Ethiopians and Eritreans
265
Index
289
About the Contributors
305
Página de créditos

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Página 12 - ... well-founded fear of persecution on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion...
Página 11 - refugee" means (A) any person who is outside any country of such person's nationality or, in the case of a person having no nationality, is outside any country in which such person last habitually resided, and who is unable or unwilling to return to, and is unable or unwilling to avail himself or herself of the protection of, that country because of persecution or a well-founded fear of persecution on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group...
Página 18 - ... United States the right to intervene on the island, but the provision had to be imposed on reluctant Cubans, who knew imperialism when they saw it. "The trouble about Cuba," Secretary of War Elihu Root said at the time, "is that, although it is technically a foreign country, practically and morally it occupies an intermediate position, since we have required it to become part of our political and military system."4 A few years later, when President Theodore Roosevelt grew impatient with unstable...

Sobre el autor (1997)

David W. Haines, who has a PhD in social anthropology, has taught at the undergraduate and graduate level and has served as a research and policy analyst for the federal refugee program. He is the editor of Refugees in the United States (Greenwood, 1985), Refugees as Immigrants: Cambodians, Laotians, and Vietnamese in America (1989) and Refugees in America in the 1990s (Greenwood, 1996). He is currently a senior manager in state government and an advisory board member to the refugee and immigration services program of the Catholic Diocese of Richmond.

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