The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte: Down to the Peace of Tolentino and the Close of His First Campaign in Italy

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T. and W. Boone, 1837 - 598 páginas
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Página iv - ... the inquiry of truth, which is the lovemaking, or wooing of it; the knowledge of truth, which is the presence of it; and the belief of truth, which is the enjoying of it, is the sovereign good of human nature.
Página 103 - Rich provinces and great cities will be in your power : there you will find honour, glory, and wealth. Soldiers of Italy ! will you be wanting in courage or perseverance ? " This speech from a young general of six-and-twenty, already distinguished by well-earned success, was received with eager acclamations.
Página 6 - Paoli. spoke disrespectfully of the distinguished general, that he might tease the sensitive lad Napoleon promptly and energetically replied. " Paoli, sir, was a great man ! he loved his country ; and I never shall forgive my father, for consenting to the union of Corsica with France. He ought to have followed Paoli's fortunes and to have fallen with him.
Página 529 - Lannes passed first, and I only followed him. It is necessary to correct that on the spot.
Página 480 - MOST HOLY FATHER ! -" I ought to thank your holiness for the obliging things contained in the letter which you have taken the trouble to write to me. " The peace between the French republic and your holiness is just signed. I felicitate myself on being able to contribute to your personal «afety.
Página 102 - Soldiers, you are hungry and naked — The Republic owes you much, but she has not the 1 [" I am particularly gratified with my reception by General Scherer ; who, by his honourable deportment and readiness to supply me with all useful information, has acquired a right to my gratitude. To great facility in expressing himself, he unites an extent of general and military knowledge, which may probably induce you to deem his services useful in some important station.*' —NAPOLEON to the Directory,...
Página 161 - ... of great ability, discusses this question in his ' Life of Napoleon,' and deems these forced contributions as not only justifiable by the laws of war, but as highly creditable to the conqueror, as adding grace and refinement to the warfare, and as reflecting lustre on the French arms, by harmonising the rudeness of military fame with the softer glories of taste and imagination.
Página 132 - ... of Piedmont. Your services are equal to those of the Army of Holland and the Rhine. You were in want of every thing, but you have provided every thing. You have gained battles without cannon — passed rivers without bridges — made forced marches without shoes — bivouacked without brandy, and often without bread. None but Republican phalanxes could have done so. For this you have the thanks of your country.
Página 176 - Kellerman would command the army as well as I ; for no one is more convinced than I am of the courage and audacity of the soldiers ; but to unite us together would ruin every thing. I will not serve with a man who considers himself the first general in Europe ; and it is better to have one bad general than two good ones. War is, like government, decided in a great degree by tact.
Página 521 - The coarse and disgusting food, on which they subsisted, was compared to the Lacedemonian broth of old, and none, it was said, but Frenchmen, Greenlanders, or Scotch Highlanders, could have fed on such messes.

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