The Christian Philosopher & Metaphysician: A Series of Tracts, to be Composed of Reviews & Essays Upon Anthroposophy, & Its Correlative Subjects

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J.S. Staples, 1852
 

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Página 32 - Created half to rise and half to fall; Great lord of all things, yet a prey to all, Sole judge of truth, in endless error hurled, The glory, jest, and riddle of the world...
Página 32 - The proper study of mankind is man. Placed on this isthmus of a middle state, A being darkly wise, and rudely great: With too much knowledge for the sceptic side, With too much weakness for the stoic's pride, He hangs between; in doubt to act, or rest; In doubt to deem himself a god, or beast; In doubt his mind or body to prefer; Born but to die, and reasoning but to err; Alike in ignorance, his reason such, Whether he thinks too little, or too much...
Página 38 - Go, wondrous creature.' mount where science guides; Go, measure earth, weigh air, and state the tides: Instruct the planets in what orbs to run, Correct old time, and regulate the sun; Go, soar with Plato to th...
Página 20 - Know then thyself, presume not God to scan, The proper study of mankind is man. Placed on this isthmus of a middle state, A being darkly wise, and rudely great: With too much knowledge for the sceptic side, With too much weakness for the Stoic's pride, He hangs between; in doubt to act, or rest; In doubt to deem himself a God, or beast...
Página 15 - Some place the bliss in action, some in ease, Those call it pleasure, and contentment these...
Página 33 - Why should ye be stricken any more ? ye will revolt more and more : the whole head is sick, and the whole heart faint. From the sole of the foot even unto the head there is no soundness in it; but wounds, and bruises, and putrifying sores : they have not been closed, neither bound up, neither mollified with ointment.
Página 13 - Here, then, is the only expedient from which we can hope for success in our philosophical researches : to leave the tedious, lingering method, which we have hitherto followed ; and, instead of taking, now and then, a castle or village on the frontier, to march up directly to the capital or centre of these sciences, to human nature itself, which being once masters of, we may everywhere else hope for an easy victory.
Página 13 - Tis evident that all the sciences have a relation, greater or less, to human nature; and that however wide any of them may seem to run from it, they still return back by one passage or another. Even mathematics, natural philosophy, and natural religion are in some measure dependent on the science of man, since they lie under the cognizance of men and are judged of by their powers and faculties.
Página 38 - Plato to the' empyreal sphere, To the first good, first perfect, and first fair; Or tread the mazy round his followers trod, And quitting sense call imitating God ; As eastern priests in giddy circles run, And turn their heads to imitate the Sun, Go, teach Eternal Wisdom how to rule— Then drop into thyself, and be a fool!
Página 22 - All these things being considered, it seems probable to me that God in the beginning formed matter in solid, massy, hard, impenetrable, moveable particles, of such sizes and figures, and with such other properties and in such proportion to space as most conduced to the end for which he formed them...

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