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ERRATA

VOL. 1.

In the last line page 59, for "scatteerd" read scattered.
In the 17th line from the top of page 131, for "much simplicity" read much of the

simplicity.

VOL. 11.

In the 3rd line from the top of page 33 insert the word uith after the word

Temonstrated.
In the 17th line from the top of page 35, for "attributed the whole series to him"

read supposed the whole series to be addressed to him.
In the last line but one on page 91, for "after" read in.
In the ninth line of the first sonnet on page 134, for "nor" read or.
In the 3rd line of 3rd stanza page 185, for "rebelsread revels.
In the 7th line of the second sonnet on page 188, for likeread on.
In the foot-note page 223, forcharacter" read characters, and for "his" read their.

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SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS.

[ON THEIR POETICAL MERITS, AND ON THE QUESTION OF to

WHOM ARE THEY ADDRESSED* ?]

At a time when our elder poets are so much studied, and so justly admired, it seems not a little extraordinary that the Sonnets of the immortal Shakespeare should be almost utterly neglected. When alluded to, as they rarely are, by modern critics, it is generally to echo the flippant insolence of Steevens, who asserted that nothing short of the strongest act of parliament could enlist readers into their service. We know, however, that in Shakespeare's life-time, these "sugred sonnets," as Meres quaintly calls them, were in great esteem, and were for a long while far better known than many of the Plays, which fell into comparative disrepute for some time before the author's death, and were not published in a collected form until several

years

after. Only eleven of the Dramas were printed during the Poet's life. Shakespeare died (on his birth-day, April 23,) in 1616. The first complete edition was printed in 1623, and was the joint speculation of four booksellers ; a circumstance from which Malone infers, that no single publisher was at the time willing to risk his money on an entire collection of the plays.

An almost impenetrable darkness rests on the question, and no effort has hitherto, in the smallest degree, tended to disperse the gloom." - Drake.

B

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