The letters of George Santayana, Libro 1;Libros 1868-1909

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MIT Press, 2001 - 618 páginas
Since the first selection of George Santayana's letters was published in 1955, shortly after his death, many more letters have been located. The Works of George Santayana, Volume V, brings together a total of 3,081 letters. The volume is divided chronologically into eight books of roughly comparable length. Book One covers the longest period of time, in effect spanning Santayana's correspondence from the 1880s through most of the first decade of the twentieth century. It illuminates Santayana's life from the age of nineteen until well into his middle years, when he had established his professional career as a full professor at Harvard. In his introduction, William Holzberger summarizes their significance as follows - 'We find in Santayana's letters not only a distillation of his philosophy but also a multitude of new perspectives on the published work. The responses to his correspondents are filled with spontaneous comments on and restatements of his fundamental philosophical ideas and principles. Because Santayana's philosophy was not for him a thing apart, but rather the foundation of his existence, the letters indicate the ways in which his entire life was permeated and directed by that philosophy.'
 

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Índice

Letters
1-1
EDITORIAL APPENDIX
1-415
Textual Commentary
1-417
ShortTitle List
1-439
Textual Notes
1-443
Report of LineEnd Hyphenation
1-505
Chronology
1-507
Addresses
1-525
Manuscript Locations
1-539
List of Recipients
1-543
List of Unlocated Letters
1-547
INDEX
1-551
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Página lii - I suppose Housman was really what people nowadays call 'homosexual,' [said Santayana)." "Why do you say that?" I [Cory] protested at once. "Oh, the sentiment of his poems is unmistakable, [Santayana replied]." There was a pause, and then he added, as if he were primarily speaking to himself, "I think I must have been that way in my Harvard days-although I was unconscious of it at the time.

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