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"I am answering your question, and I will give you my opinion of your morality and virtue. With respect to the plot and measures in which those men, whom you call Cato Street Conspirators, 66 were seduced and involved by our Ministers (meaning the said persons employed by our said Lord the King in the administra"tion of the Government and affairs of this realm) and their agents, they have my decided disapprobation; but, as I consider that the "majority of the present Ministers (meaning the said persons em"ployed by our said Lord the King in the administration of the Go"vernment and affairs of this realm) are tyrants, and enemies to the "intersts and welfare of the people of this country, so also am I bold "to confess, that if any man who has suffered unjustly under their “ administration, should be so far indifferent about his own life 66 as to slay any one or more of them, I would tune my lyre to sing "his praises. I consider it to be a want of virtue and true courage, "that makes a man seek companions to perform such an act, and "a proof that he calls upon others to do that which he has not re"solution to do single-handed; and, in seeking men that will cooperate with him, he is sure to fall in with the most vicious of "mankind and to mar all the good that he might have done as an "individual. I condemn an association for such purposes." In contempt of our said Lord the King, and his laws; to the evil example of all others, and against the peace of our said Lord the King his crown and dignity.

Second Count-And the said Attorney General of our said Lord the King, for our said Lord the King, further gives the Court here to understand and be informed, that the said Jane Carlile, so being such person as aforesaid, and unlawfully and wickedly contriving and intending to move and excite the liege subjects of our said Lord the King to the commission of the crime of murder, heretofore, (to wit,) on the said seventeenth day of June, in the first year of the reign aforesaid, at London aforesaid, in the Parish and Ward aforesaid, unlawfully and wickedly did publish, and cause to be published, a certain other wicked and mischievous libel, containing therein, amongst other things, divers wicked and mischievous matters and things according to the tenor following (that is to say,) "I will now come to the point with you, and tell you more "than you seem to ask, lest you should say that I evade the ques❝tion. In the first place I hold the destruction of tyrants by put"ting them to death suddenly and violently, or if you should think "I am not suficiently explicit, by assassinating them, to be an "act, just, moral, virtuous, and legal, agreeable to the law of na

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ture, which should be the foundation of all other law. A tyrant "is the common destroyer of his species, and any member of that "community in which he dwells and plays the tyrant, that shall "receive any injury from him, may, in my opinion, meritoriously .66 put him to death. The moralist, or a man with the most humane દુઃ mind, will stand aloof and ask himself the following question:

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which would have been the greatest outrage on the laws, morals, "and welfare, of this society: that this man, who is an avowed " and admitted tyrant, should fall by the hand of one whom he has injured, or that he should have lived to have made unhappy, "miserable, and in continual fear for their lives and properties, every member of this society that should not feel disposed to "fatter and applaud his wicked measures? Give me an answer to "this last question in the same frank and candid manner in which "I am answering your question, and I will give you my opinion of your moralitity and virtue. With respect to the plot and measures "in which those men, whom you call Cato-street Conspirators, "were seduced and involved by our ministers and their agents, they have my decided disapprobation; but as I consider that the majority of the present ministers are tyrants, and enemies to the "interests and welfare of the people of this country, so also am 1 "bold to confess, that if any man who has suffered unjustly, under "their administration, should be so far indifferent about his own "life as to slay any one, or more of them, I would tune my lyre to sing his praises. I consider it to be a want of virtue and true "courage that makes a man seek companions to perform such an "act; it is a proof that he calls upon others to do that which he "has no resolution to do single-handed; and, in seeking men that "will co-operate with him, he is sure to fall in with the most "vicious of mankind, and mar all the good he might have done as "an individual. I condemn an association for such purposes." In contempt of our said Lord the King and his laws, to the evil example of all others, and against the peace of our said Lord the King, his crown and dignity. Whereupon, the said Attorney Geneneral of our said Lord the King, who for our said Lord the King in this behalf prosecutes, prays the consideration of the Court here in the premises, and that due process of law may be awarded against the said Jane Carlile, in this behalf, to make her answer to our said Lord the King, touching and concerning the premises aforesaid.

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REPORT, &c. §.c.

THE Junior Counsel stated to the Court, that this was an Information filed by the Attorney-General against Mrs. Carlile, for the publication of a libel in No. 8, Vol. III. of THE REPUBLICAN of June 16, 1820, &c.

The SOLICITOR GENERAL addressed the Jury on the part of the prosecution. He said, that his friend, the Attorney-General, had thought it incumbent on him to institute the present prosecution, and the Jury, after they had read the libel, would concur with him, that had he not so done, he would have been guilty of a gross dereliction of duty. The work in which the libel was published had been several times the subject of prosecution for the seditious and blasphemous matter which it contained. The husband of the Defendant, Richard Carlile, was at present suffering for his concern in another publication; but it was hoped that future instances of severity would be thereby rendered unnecessary. These hopes have proved fallacious: the husband being removed, his wife took up the trade, after which his sister, and eventually a shopman, a person of low condition, became connected with the work. The Learned Gentleman regretted that a female should be the object of prosecution; but she could not complain, after continuing to give to the world the mischievous work in question, after the warnings which she had received from former prosecutions.

The libel was contained in a letter dated frem Dorchester Gaol, signed "Richard Carlile," and addressed to the Rev. William Wait, of King's Square, Bristol, and purported to be an answer to some questions put by that Reverend Gentleman to the writer of the letter. Although the letter bore the signature of R. Carlile, the Crown had not the means of proving it to be his production, and had therefore proceeded against the seller and publisher. Referring to the libel, he would abstain from all argument to show its mischievous and horrid ten

dency. If the bare perusal did not satisfy the Jury, nothing that he could say would have that effect. After some argument, the libel proceeds to speak of the Cato Street Conspiracy-that Conspiracy which had had the seal of four intelligent juries set upon it. In speaking of this, the writer's words are, "I hold the destruction of "tyrants, by putting them to death suddenly and violently, "or, if you should think I am not sufficiently explicit, "by assassinating them, to be an art, just, moral, vir"tuous, and legal, agreeable to the law of nature, which "should be the foundation of all other law." Thus any one whom the writer thought fit to say was a tyrant, he openly contended he was justified in assassinating; but, thank God! such doctrines were alien to the breasts of Englishmen. The writer goes on to say: "With respect "to the plot and measures in which these men, whom "you call Cato Street Conspirators, were seduced and "involved by our Ministers and their agents, they have "my decided disapprobation; but, as I consider, that "the majority of the present Ministers are tyrants, and "enemics to the interests and welfare of the people of "this country, so also am I bold to confess, that, if any "man who has suffered unjustly under their administra"tion, should be so far indifferent about his own life, as "to slay any one or more of them, I would tune my lyre, "to sing his praises. I consider it to be a want of virtue "and true courage, that makes a man seek companions "to perform such an act, and a proof that he calls upon "others to do that which he has not resolution to do "single-handed; and, in seeking men that will co

operate with him, he is sure to fall in with the most "vicious of mankind, and to mar all the good that he "might have done as an individual. I condemn an "association for such purposes." The learned Counsel concluded by observing, that the Jury would hear the libel read, and he doubted not that they would, without hesitation, give him their verdict.

Richard Samuel Houlditch was sworn and examined. He proved that he bought the paper put into his hands, No. 8, of Vol. III. of THE REPUBLICAN, on the 17th of June, 1820, of the Defendant, personally, at her shop in Fleet Street.

The judgment of the Court of King's Bench on Richard Carlile was put in evidence to prove that he was not a free agent, and therefore could have no controul over his wife,

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