Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, with a life and notes by Richard lord Braybrooke, deciphered, with additional notes, by M. Bright, Volumen 1

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Richard Griffin (3rd baron Braybrooke), Mynors Bright
1875
 

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Página 191 - I went out to Charing Cross to see Major-general Harrison hanged, drawn, and quartered ; which was done there, he looking as cheerful as any man could do in that condition.
Página 228 - Where the great Sun begins his state Robed in flames and amber light, The clouds in thousand liveries dight; While the ploughman, near at hand, Whistles o'er the furrowed land, And the milkmaid singeth blithe, And the mower whets his scythe, And every shepherd tells his tale Under the hawthorn in the dale.
Página 190 - Greatorex brought, which do carry up the water with a great deal of ease. Here, in the Park, we met with Mr. Salisbury, who took Mr. Creed and me to the Cockpit to see " The Moore of Venice,
Página 211 - was newly begun ; and so we went in, and saw it well acted : and here I saw the first time one Moone, who is said to be the best actor in the world, lately come over with the King, and indeed it is the finest play-house, I believe^ that ever was in England.
Página 284 - Now, after all this, I can say, that, besides the pleasure of the sight of these glorious things, I may now shut my eyes against any other objects, nor for the future trouble myself to see things of state and show, as being sure never to see the like again in this world.
Página xxxi - BLESSED be God, at the end of the last year I was in very good health, without any sense of my old pain, but upon taking of cold. I lived in Axe Yard, having my wife, and servant Jane, and no more in family than us three.
Página 123 - After this discourse I was called to write a pass for my Lord Mandeville to take up horses to London, which I wrote in the King's name, and carried it to him to sign, which was the first and only one that ever he signed in the ship Charles.
Página 253 - Changeling,"1 the first time it hath been acted these twenty years, and it takes exceedingly. Besides, I see the gallants do begin to be tyred with the vanity and pride of the theatre actors, who are indeed grown very proud and rich.
Página 351 - Then to the Wardrobe, and dined there, and then abroad and in Cheapside hear that the Spanish hath got the best of it, and killed three of the French coach-horses and several men, and is gone through the City next to our King's coach ; at which, it is ' The Baron de Vatteville. strange to see how all the City did rejoice. And indeed we do naturally all love the Spanish, and hate the French.
Página 36 - In Cheapside there was a great many bonfires, and Bow bells and all the bells in all the churches as we went home were a-ringing. Hence we went homewards, it being about ten at night. But the common joy that was everywhere to be seen ! The number of bonfires, there being fourteen between St. Dunstan's and Temple Bar, and at Strand Bridge 2 I could at one time tell thirty-one fires.

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