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and diftinctions lead, but to acts of barbarity and perfecútion, which would difgrace the most fanguinary annals of the Goths and Vandals.

We in one place hear of a noble Prince and General dying gloriously of a wound received in defence of his Country, and while his affectionaté and forrowful Attendants humbly implored of his Conqueror, that their Mafter might be interred among a long feries of his Ancestors, the requeft was refufed with mean, infulting, and farcaftic malice. In another page, we read of a Queen, graced with every feminine attribute, which was wont to foften even the ferocious brows of Tyrants themfelves, a fugitive from her home, her family, her husband, purfued with unrelenting and vindictive threats, far more alarming than a thousand deaths.

But let us turn from thefe waftes, where human blood has not yet ceafed to flow, where the enfanguined Laurel of Victory quickens in one vaft folitude, where no flowers perfume and no rofes blow, to the ftill fertile and ftill happy plains of our Country-that is, happy in themfelves; for a generous fympathy in the misfortunes of others is the pride of true valour, and the characteristic of Englifhmen. Let us unite in imploring that gracious Providence, which has hitherto preferved us a free, a great, and enlightened people, to preferve us fo ftill. Thoufands and tens of thousands of her fons affemble with patriotic conrage round their Country's Banners, determined to die or to preferve them from the unhallowed touch of Foreign Mifcreants. Thoufands yet remain who, under fuch protection, with confidence and zeal, and hope and delight, wander among the bowers which environ the Temple of Apollo and the Mufes, and from time to time produce fruits of undiminifhed fragrance and perfection.

Be it our boaft that, with undeviating firmnefs, we have purfued one and the fame path; we have extended the Egis with which we have been entrusted, as a fhelter beneath which the Advocates of true Piety, of Loyalty, of Patriotifm, of Learning, and of every ingenuous Art, might exhibit their labours with fafety and with honour. Thus we fhall act to the laft; and truft that when we fail from that Final Caufe which can alone fufpend or reftrain our exertions, we fhall deliver over our mantle to fome worthy Succeffor, animated with the fame fear of God, love of our. King, and devotion to our Country.

Dec. 31, 1806.

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S. URBAN.

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AVERAGE PRICES of CORN, from the Returns ending January 18, 1806.

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23

59 50 47

,90 cloudy

24

48

51 40'

,52 fair,

25

26

56

39 44

37

,60 fair

35 41

36

,25 cloudy

S.

141 033 532

741 6 Effex

72

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Nottingh. 78
Derby 78 10 00
Stafford 80 9 00
Salop 83 551
Hereford 81 751
Worceft. 84 400 040 820 646 5 Chefter 72 200
Warwick 81 600 040 629 353 1 Flint
Wilts 73 800 033 827 455 o Denbigh 81
Berks
74 800 0131 2,28 741 11 Anglefea oo
Oxford 72 7:00 033 126 941 11 Carnarvon 79.
800
Bucks 70 100 030 926 842 11 Merionet. 89 10'00
Brecon 94 457 747
000 o Cardigan 80- 8:00
Montgo. 84 900 046 5 22
Radnor 87 1000 043 523

044

4 Durham 68

3,00

037

7,25

200

849

040 4,28
042
627
042 325
648
24025 230 11 Lancafter 71 1000

o Northum. 61

046

0.33

226

4 82

251 4 Cumberl. 72

959

139

925

200

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o Weftmor. 77 1059

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AVERAGE PRICES, by which Exportation and Bounty are to be regulated.

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THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE,

For JANUARY, 1806.

LETTER XXVII. ON PRISONS.

Sambrook Court, Mr. URBAN, January 24. "It is pleasant to fee great works in "their feminal fate, pregnant with latent "poffibilities of excellence *."

T

HE more attentively I confider the communications of Neild, the more highly do I eftimate their utility. They not only exhibit the fite and internaf flructure and management of prifons, but likewife the means of augmenting their advantages, and of obviating their inconveniences; they enable the magiftrate and the manager to promote objects of utility the moft eafily attainable, and elicit plans of reformation the moft beneficial; they contain leffons of inftruction to all ranks of the community, and convey an invaluable legacy to pofterity t.

In the fubfequent hiftories of the prifons of Morpeth, and Newcastle, little of novelty is prefented, except that at the latter a court compofed of the prifoners is held, that takes cognizance of any misbehaviour among themfelves; which, probably, tends to promote order and prevent immorality; and, by exercifing the mind in ufeful inveftigation, and the judgment in acts of jurifprudence, Vice may be feen in its own repulfive deformity, and Virtue in its attractive graces; for

Johnfon's Poets, vol. 1. p. 176.

I may now add, that in order to ren der thefe Prifon Letters more ufeful to the community, there will foon appear a letter on the means of promoting the fecuity, healt, and morals of grifeners.

"when it is prefent men take ex

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ample of it, and when it is gone they defire it .".

The contemplation of great and ufeful events from little caufes § is always gratifying. The first productions of Neild fcarcely excited attention, for certainly they were not luminous; they did not blaze and dazzle the fight, but they poffeffed the fteady warmth of embers, whofe latent heat is diffufive and permanent: if he did not delight the eye, he pierced the heart, and gradually convinced the under standing, and gave fervency to the mind. In no place to which he has extended his vifits, has more good refulted in a fhort fpace of time than in Norwich. The magiftrates can now affemble in the parlour of the gaol without danger of fuffocation, in confequence of the fewer having been repaired; and the fevere punishments introduced in the workhoufe have been generally reprobated, and totally abolished; yet, here has ingratitude attempted to cancel obligation, as if to fee" the highest minds le"velled with the meaneft, might produce fome folace to the con

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sciousness of weakness, and some "mortification to the pride of wif"dom: but, let it be remembered, "that minds are not levelled in "their powers but when they are "firft levelled in their defires*" Under this fentiment, however, I do not include the temarks of John Gurney (Gent. Mag, for December laft, p. 1124), a man who is incapable of doing a mean action, and whofe motives of conduct, I am perfuaded, alone refult from a Confcioufnels of duty.

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phalanx of his benevolent connections. Then, as Dante remarks, might they have

Guardar l'un l'autro, some alver fi

“quata‡.” Inferno, c. xvi. 78, As John Gurney's qualification muft, in many refpects, have hence been derived from verbal information, his letter would have remained unnoticed had not his amiable character excited a claim to regard; for the different appear ance of the workhoufe at the time he yifited it, could not detract from the evidence of what Neild really faw, and candidly related; and from which the Mayor of Norwich, the only competent perfop to determine the facts, has never diffented. I well remember the obfervations made to me by Howard on a fimilar occafion; that, "unlefs he entered "unawares into fuch receptacles of "diftrefs, he could never acquire "accurate information." Here it would be too tedious to relate the whole converfation that took place between him and the Minifter deputed from the Emprefs of Ruffia Thefe charges of to invite him to court; and in the mean time, to give orders to the keepers of the prifons to be prepared to receive him. I did not

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He has communicated his remarks on Neild's narrative refpecting the workhoufe of Norwich, with the appearance of ingenuity, and his diffent with that of candour: he introduces himfelf, how ever, to the notice of the publick in a manner neither calculated to have gained a juft information, nor frence to excite conviction; "Having qualified myfelf to give the "precife information," he obferves, "on the charges brought by James "Neild, efq. against the Guardians of our Poor, in refpect to the old workhoufe." the ftate of the Poor having been máde and publifhed feveral weeks prior to the qualification alluded to, it prefumes upon giving what it is come to St. Petersburg," faid impoffible to give, precife informa- Howard," to yifit courts, (he did tion upon what, in many refpects, not go to court) "but prifons; and only previously exifted. Every per-if the keepers are previously infon, however, who eftimates the "formed of my coming, I fhall not character of John Gurney with the "acquire the information I want." high respect that I think it an ho- If the difcriminating eye of Howard nour to own from perfonal ac- could not depend upon what might quaintance, muft regret that he had be prefented, were the knowledge not fooner qualified himself to exof his vifits anticipated but a fingle amine and remove the evils refult hour, it is no degradation of the chaing from parochial mismanagement; racter of John Gurney to conclude for," Hoc maximè officii eft (apud that he could not be enabled to give Tullium) ut quifque maximè that precife information, and clear opus indigeat, ita ei potiffimum elucidation which he prefumes himopitulari t." To have thus aided felf qualified to convey; however Neild, would not have derogated fair his teftimony might have been, From the refpectability of his pri- independently of the bias which vate character, nor the venerable might determine his opinion of the conduct of his own townfmen, and,

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* Johnson's Poets, vol. II. p. 26.

It is a principal point of duty to aflist another moff, when he ftands most in need of affiftance.

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