Re-visions of Shakespeare: Essays in Honor of Robert Ornstein

Portada
Robert Ornstein, Evelyn Gajowski
University of Delaware Press, 2004 - 298 páginas
Re-Visions of Shakespeare: Essays in Honor of Robert Ornstein is a tribute to one of the most prominent Shakespeareans in the last half of the twentieth century, past president of the Shakespeare Association of America, and author of Shakespeare's Comedies: From Roman Farce to Romantic Mystery, and Other texts. Twelve original contributions by an international group of scholars, including some of the most prominent working in Shakespeare studies today, use a variety of theoretical perspectives to address issues of contemporary import in the dramatic texts. Janus-like, the collection suggests the directions of Shakespeare studies at the outset of the new millennium while considering their roots in the last.

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

No hemos encontrado ninguna reseña en los sitios habituales.

Índice

Alterity Sexuality and Gender
33
The Veriest Shrews of All
35
Shakespeares Bad Jew
57
Engaging Death in Titus Andronicus
66
Female Sexual Autonomy Voyeurism and Misogyny in Cymbeline
89
Dramatic Paradigms Male Sexuality and the Power of Shame in Alls Well That Ends Well
108
Performance and Text
129
ShakespeareHistory and Imagined Community
131
Intertextuality Mode and Genre
187
As You Like It and the PastoralBashing Impulse
189
Surprising the Audience in The Comedy of Errors
215
Comedy and Death in Alls Well That Ends Well
231
History and Psychology in Richard II Criticism
243
Bibliography of Robert Ornsteins Scholarship
260
Bibliography
263
Contributors
280

A Comic Vision of Othello
150
Cue One Macbeth
165

Otras ediciones - Ver todo

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 180 - Thou sure and firm-set earth, Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear Thy very stones prate of my where-about, And take the present horror from the time, Which now suits with it.
Página 61 - Nay, take my life and all ; pardon not that : You take my house, when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house ; you take my life, When you do take the means whereby I live.
Página 107 - And, to deal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind. Methinks I should know you and know this man; Yet I am doubtful: for I am mainly ignorant What place this is, and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night.
Página 180 - Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf, Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace. With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design Moves like a ghost.
Página 182 - Was the hope drunk, Wherein you dress'd yourself? hath it slept since, And wakes it now, to look so green and pale At what it did so freely? From this time Such I account thy love. Art thou afeard To be the same in thine own act and valour As thou art in desire ? Wouldst thou have that Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life, And live a coward in thine own esteem, Letting "I dare not" wait upon "I would," Like the poor cat i
Página 182 - Wherein you dress'd yourself? hath it slept since? And wakes it now, to look so green and pale At what it did so freely ? From this time, Such I account thy love. Art thou afeard To be the same in thine own act and valour, As thou art in desire ? Would'st thou have that Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life, And live a coward in thine own esteem ' ; Letting I dare not wait upon I would, Like the poor cat i'the adage'?
Página 209 - Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile, Hath not old custom made this life more sweet Than that of painted pomp? Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, — The seasons...
Página 182 - tis to love the babe that milks me: I would, while it was smiling in my face, Have pluck'd my nipple from his boneless gums, And dash'd the brains out, had I so sworn as you Have done to this.
Página 182 - Which would be worn now in their newest gloss, Not cast aside so soon. Lady M. Was the hope drunk Wherein you dress'd yourself? hath it slept since, And wakes it now, to look so green and pale At what it did so freely ? From this time Such I account thy love. Art thou...

Información bibliográfica