History of the captivity of Napoleon at St. Helena: from the letters and journals of the late Lieut.-Gen. Sir Hudson Lowe, and official documents not before made public, Volumen 3

Portada
 

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

No hemos encontrado ninguna reseña en los sitios habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todo

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 115 - It is impossible to doubt the meaning which this passage was intended to convey, and my Lords can as little doubt that the insinuation is a calumnious falsehood ; but if it were true, and if so horrible a suggestion were made to you directly or indirectly, it was your bounden duty not to have lost a moment in communicating it to the Admiral on the spot, or to the Secretary of State, or to their Lordships. "An overture so monstrous in itself, and so deeply involving not merely the personal character...
Página 432 - ... with him, conversing for hours together with me alone, both in his own house and grounds and at Longwood, either in my own room, or under the trees and elsewhere. On some of these occasions he made to me observations upon the benefit which would result to Europe from the death of Napoleon...
Página 62 - March. The 36,000 francs for 1817, and the like sum for 1819, have also been paid by the person ordered. Remain quiet as to the funds placed ; the farmers are good, and they will pay bills for the amount of the income, which must be calculated at the rate of four per cent.
Página 468 - I THINK it my duty to state, as his late medical attendant, that considering the disease of the liver with which he is afflicted, the progress it has made in him, and reflecting upon the great mortality produced by that complaint in the island of St. Helena, (so strongly exemplified in the number of deaths in the 66ih regiment, the St.
Página 160 - I must here beg leave to state that in the execution of my duty yesterday I was upon my feet upwards of ten hours, endeavouring to procure a sight of Napoleon Bonaparte, either in his little garden, or at one of his windows, but could not succeed; that during the whole of this time I was exposed to the...
Página 312 - ... involve nations in strife. "War is in itself an unmitigated curse. It is indeed the abomination of desolation. It may impose upon the imagination with all its proud pomp and circumstance, and few sights can be conceived of more thrilling interest than the march of a great army in compact array. But follow that army to the battle-field. See it after the shock of conflict, when the clash of swords is over and the artillery has ceased to thunder. Listen to the cries of the wounded and the groans...
Página 223 - haricots blancs ' and ' haricots verts ' bear any reference to the ' drapeau blanc ' of the Bourbons, and the ' habit vert ' of General Bonaparte himself, and the livery of his servants at Longwood, I am unable to say ; but the Marquis de Montchenu, it appears to me, would have acted with more propriety if he had declined receiving either, or limited himself to a demand for the white alone.
Página 433 - ... him, conversing for hours together with me alone, both in his own house and grounds and at Longwood, either in my own room, or under the trees and elsewhere. On some of these occasions he made to me observations upon the benefit which would result to Europe from the death of Napoleon Bonaparte, of which event he spoke in a manner which, considering his situation and mine, was peculiarly distressing to me.
Página 279 - I cannot help thinking that Napoleon's kindlymeant present might, under all the circumstances, have been accepted, notwithstanding the style of Emperor was inscribed in the volumes. He did not send them as coming from the Emperor', nor write the objectionable title in them ; nor was there much likelihood of a British regiment being seduced from its allegiance by adding to its library a few books, the gift of Napoleon.
Página 468 - Conqueror, which ship has lost about one sixth of her complement, nearly the whole of whom died within the last eight months,) it is my opinion, that the life of Napoleon Bonaparte will be endangered by a longer residence in such a climate as that of St. Helena, especially if that residence be aggravated by a continuance of those disturbances and irritations to which he has been hitherto subjected, and of which it is the nature of his distemper to render him peculiarly susceptible.

Información bibliográfica