The American Diplomatic Code Embracing a Collection of Treaties and Conventions Between the United States and Foreign Powers: from 1778 to 1834: With an Abstract of Important Judicial Decisions, on Points Connected with Our Foreign Relations. Also, A Concise Diplomatic Manual, Containing a Summary of the Law of Nations, from the Works of Wicquefort, Martens, Kent, Vattel, Ward, Story, &c. &c. ...

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Jonathan Elliot
J. Elliot, jun., 1834
A compilation of official U.S. treaties in chronological order

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Página 37 - ... engage mutually not to grant any particular favor to other nations in respect of commerce and navigation which shall not immediately become common to the other party, who shall enjoy the same freely, if the concession was freely made, or on allowing the same compensation if the concession was conditional.
Página 19 - ... the other, transient or dwelling therein, leaving open and free to them the tribunals of justice for their judicial recourse, on the same terms which are usual and customary with the natives or citizens of the country in which they may be...
Página 197 - ... and, generally, the merchants and traders of each nation, respectively, shall enjoy the most complete protection and security for their commerce, but subject always to the laws and statutes of the two countries, respectively.
Página 42 - And whereas it frequently happens that Vessels sail for a Port or Place belonging to an Enemy, without knowing that the same is besieged, blockaded, or invested ; it is agreed, that every Vessel so circumstanced may be turned away from such Port or Place, but shall not be detained, nor shall any part of her cargo, if not contraband, be confiscated, unless, after warning of such Blockade or investment, from any Officer commanding a Vessel of the Blockading Forces, she shall again attempt to enter;...
Página 289 - The jurisdiction of the nation within its own territory is necessarily exclusive and absolute. It is susceptible of no limitation not imposed by itself. Any restriction upon it, deriving validity from an external source, would imply a diminution of its sovereignty to the extent of the restriction, and an investment of that sovereignty to the same extent in that power which could impose such restriction.
Página 199 - It shall be free for each of the two Contracting Parties to appoint Consuls for the protection of trade, to reside in the dominions and territories of the other Party; but before any Consul shall act as such, he shall, in the usual form, be approved and...
Página 92 - River; then following the course of the Rio Roxo westward, to the degree of longitude 100 west from London, and 23 from Washington; then crossing the said Red River, and running thence by a line due north to the river Arkansas; thence following the course of the southern bank of the Arkansas to its source, in latitude 42 degrees north; and thence by that parallel of latitude to the South Sea...
Página 84 - Contracting Parties shall have given notice to the Other of its intention to terminate the same; Each of the High Contracting Parties reserving to Itself the right of giving such notice to the Other, at the end of the said term of Ten Years...
Página 27 - And whenever such tribunal of either party shall pronounce judgment against any Vessel or goods or property claimed by the Citizens of the other party, the sentence or decree shall mention the reasons or motives, on which the same shall have been founded and an authenticated copy of the sentence or decree and of all the proceedings in the case shall, if demanded, be delivered to the Commander or Agent of Said Vessel, without any delay, he paying the legal fees for the same ARTICLE TWENTY SECOND.
Página 119 - But it shall be allowed to the subjects of France to catch fish, and to dry them on land, in that part only, and in no other besides that, of the said island of Newfoundland, which stretches from the place called Cape Bonavista to the northern point of the said island, and from thence running down by the western side, reaches as far as the place called Point Riche.

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