The Art of Case Study Research

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SAGE, 5 abr. 1995 - 175 páginas
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This book presents a disciplined, qualitative exploration of case study methods by drawing from naturalistic, holistic, ethnographic, phenomenological and biographic research methods.

Robert E. Stake uses and annotates an actual case study to answer such questions as: How is the case selected? How do you select the case which will maximize what can be learned? How can what is learned from one case be applied to another? How can what is learned from a case be interpreted? In addition, the book covers: the differences between quantitative and qualitative approaches; data-gathering including document review; coding, sorting and pattern analysis; the roles of the researcher; triangulation; and reporting.

 

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Índice

The Unique Case
1
Producing generalizations Petite and grand particularity
7
Criteria for selection of cases
13
Research Questions
15
Evolution of issue questions Progressive focussing etic
20
Questions calling for coded data Flanders interaction analysis
29
The Nature of Qualitative Research
35
Other characteristics of qualitative research Scales
43
Fieldwork implication of roles
104
Triangulation
107
Targets for triangulation Uncontestable description need
110
Role play school board members
116
Writing the Report
121
Organizing the report early on Outlining page allocation
122
Vignettes Narrative fraud Burbank fieldtrip
128
Reflections
133

Data Gathering
49
Access and permissions Confidentiality terminating
57
Description of contexts Vicarious experience
63
Interview observers of an interview
69
Categorical aggregation or direct interpretation The Thought Fox
74
Naturalistic generalizations Reader population of cases
85
Case Researcher Roles
91
The case researcher as interpreter René Magritte
97
Harper School
137
School Improvement
143
Shadow Study of a Sixth Grader
150
Implementation of Reform
158
GlossaryIndex
169
About the Author 175
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Sobre el autor (1995)

Professor Stake received his B.A. in Mathematics with a minor in naval science and Spanish from the University of Nebraska in 1950. He graduated with an M.A. in educational psychology in 1954 from this university. In 1958, he received his Ph.D. in psychology from Princeton University. From 1955 to 1958, he was a Psychometric Fellow at the Educational Testing Service. Then, an Associate Professor and Faculty Research Coordinator of the College of Education at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. In 1963, he arrived at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he assisted Thomas Hastings, Lee Cronbach, and Jack Easley in the creation of the new evaluation center, CIRCE, and in developing a program of research on program evaluation. He also became the Associate Director of the Statewide High School Testing Program. In 1975, he became director of CIRCE. He has been active in the program evaluation profession and has promoted an approach to evaluation methods called "responsive evaluation." He took up a qualitative perspective, particularly case study methods, in order to represent the personal experience and complexity of evaluation study. He received the Lazerfeld Award from the American Evaluation Association and an honorary doctorate from the University of Uppsala.

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