Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists; and Incidental Notes on Other Arts, Volumen 5

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Printed at the Shakespeare Press, by W. Nicol, for John Major ... and Robert Jennings, 1828
 

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Página 171 - In books and gardens thou hast plac'd aright (Things, which thou well dost understand ; And both dost make with thy laborious hand) Thy noble, innocent delight ; And in thy virtuous wife, where thou again dost meet Both pleasures more refin'd and sweet ; The fairest garden in her looks, And in her mind the wisest books.
Página 170 - He unfolded the perfection of the one, and assisted the imperfection of the other. He adored from examination ; was a courtier that flattered only by informing his prince, and by pointing out what was worthy for him to countenance ; and really was the Neighbour of the Gospel, for there was no man that might not have been the better for him.
Página 158 - ... congenial propensity flattered and confirmed the inclination of his uncle ! How the muse of arts would have repaid the patronage of the monarch, when, for his first artist, she would have presented him with his nephew ! How different a figure did the same prince make in a reign of dissimilar complexion ! The philosophic warrior, who could relax himself into the ornament of a refined court, was thought a savage mechanic, when courtiers were only voluptuous wits.
Página 158 - Born with the taste of an uncle whom his sword was not fortunate in defending, Prince Rupert was fond of those sciences which soften and adorn a hero's private hours, and knew how to mix them with his minutes of amusement, without dedicating his life to their pursuit, like us, who, wanting capacity for momentous views, make serious study of what is only the transitory occupation of a genius. Had the court of the first Charles been peaceful, how agreeably had the prince's congenial propensity nattered...
Página 77 - The Compleat Gentleman: Fashioning Him absolute in the most Necessary and Commendable Qualities concerning Mind or Body, that may be required in a Person of Honor.
Página 118 - York, and of which manufacture he gave Thoresby a fine mug. (This pottery cost him much money: he attempted it solely from a turn to experiment; but one Clifton, of Pontefract, took the hint from him, and made a fortune by it.) This author adds that Mr.
Página 132 - FAITHORNE (William). THE ART OF GRAVEING AND ETCHING. Wherein is exprest the true way of Graveing in Copper. Also the manner and method of that famous Callot, and Mr. Bosse, in their Severall ways of Etching.
Página 282 - Vertue's next considerable production was the heads of Charles I. and the loyal sufferers in his cause, with their characters subjoined from Clarendon. But this was scarce finished, before appeared Rapin's History of England, " a work," says he, " that had a prodigious run, especially after translated, insomuch that it became all the conversation of the town and country; and the noise being heightened by opposition and party, it was proposed to publish it in folio by numbers—thousands were sold...
Página 3 - A Catalogue of English Heads, or an account of about two thousand prints; describing what is peculiar to each, as the name, title, or office of the person, the habit, posture, age, or time when done. The name of the painter, graver, scraper, &c. And some remarkable particulars belonging to their lives; by Joseph Ames, FRS and Secretary to the Society of Antiquaries, 8vo, 1748.

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