History of the captivity of Napoleon at St. Helena: from the letters and journals of the late Lieut.-Gen. Sir Hudson Lowe, and official documents not before made public, Volumen 2

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Página 208 - Yes ! where is he, the Champion and the Child Of all that's great or little, wise or wild ? Whose game was empires and whose stakes were thrones ? Whose table, earth — whose dice were human bones ? Behold the grand result in yon lone isle, And, as thy nature urges, weep or smile.
Página 4 - ... them have superior officers in the administration who watch over them. On this rock, the man who makes the most absurd regulations, executes them with violence, and transgresses all laws; there is nobody to check the outrages of his passions. " The Prince Regent can never be informed of the acts carried on under his name ; they have refused to forward my letters to him...
Página 3 - My dear Count de Las Cases, — My heart is deeply affected by what you now experience. Torn from me a fortnight ago, you have been ever since closely confined, without the possibility of my receiving any news from you, or sending you any ; without having had any communication with any person, either French or English ; deprived even of the attendance of a servant of your own choice. " Your conduct at St. Helena has been, like the whole of your life, honourable and irreproachable ; I have pleasure...
Página 337 - The fact was this : soon after his .arrival at St. Helena, he expressed a wish for some books to complete his library, and a list was made out by General Buonaparte himself, and transmitted to this country. This list was sent to an eminent French bookseller in this town, with orders to supply such of the books as he had, and to obtain the rest from other booksellers. As several of the books were not to be obtained in London, the bookseller was desired to write to Paris for them. He accordingly obtained...
Página 139 - ... only. It is my opinion that whatever is the custom of a nation and is practised by the first characters of that nation towards their chief, cannot degrade strangers who perform the same.
Página 367 - ... assurance that there would be a house in six years ? Upon the most frightful spot in the world, all necessary measures have been taken to render unavailable the local resources of this poor place. The establishment is as bad as possible. How can it be conceived, that all this is without a purpose ? " Sir Hudson Lowe wrote to the General, whether he would like to have a new house erected, or addition made to the old one: he received no answer.
Página 5 - Governor of this country to send you to the Continent ; he cannot refuse, since he has no power over you, but by virtue of the act which you have voluntarily signed. It will be a great source of consolation to me to know that you are on your way to more favoured climes. " Once in Europe, whether you proceed to England or return home, endeavour to forget the evils which you have been made to suffer ; and boast of the fidelity which you have shewn towards me, and of all the affection I feel for you....
Página 363 - ... established rules, when he will ride up and respectfully inform him of it. V. The regulations already in force, for preventing communication with any persons without the Governor's permission, will be required to be strictly adhered to : it is requested, therefore, General Bonaparte will abstain from entering any houses, or engaging in conversation with the persons he may meet, (except so far as the ordinary salutations of politeness, with which every one will be instructed to treat him, may...
Página 238 - Summoned to attend at Plantation House by letter from Major Gorrequer. As the reader must be already disgusted with the details of the manner in which the governor took advantage of his situation to insult and oppress an officer inferior in rank, because the latter refused to be his spy ; I shall not fatigue him with any further account of the conduct practised towards me on this day, than that my replies and refusals to disclose Napoleon's conversations, caused me to be treated in a more outrageous...
Página 138 - ... otherwise they ought not to have sent him at all. I observed that the English would consider it as debasing to the nation, if Lord Amherst had consented to prostrate himself in the manner required. That if such a point were conceded, the Chinese would probably not be contented, and would require similar ceremonies to be performed to those insisted upon by the Japanese, and so disgracefully complied with by the Dutch. Napoleon replied, ' It is quite a different thing. One is a...

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