The Psychology of Music

Portada
Diana Deutsch
Gulf Professional Publishing, 1999 - 807 páginas
The aim of the psychology of music is to understand musical phenomena in terms of mental functions--to characterize the ways in which one perceives, remembers, creates, and performs music. Since publication of the first edition of The Psychology of Music, the field has emerged from an interdisciplinary curiosity into a fully ramified subdiscipline of psychology as a result of several factors. First, the opportunity to generate, analyze, and transform sounds by computer is no longer limited to a few researchers with access to large multi-user facilities, but is now available to individual investigators on a widespread basis. Second, dramatic advances in the field of neuroscience have profoundly influenced thinking about the way that music is processed in the brain. Third, collaborations between psychologists and musicians, which were evolving at the time the first edition was written, are now quite common, and to a large extent these two groups speak a common language and agree on basic philosophical issues.
The Psychology of Music, Second Edition has been completely revised to bring the reader the most up-to-date information and additional subject matter, and new contributions examine all of these important developments. The book is intended as a comprehensive reference source for musicians, psychologists, and students interested in and studying this exciting psychological discipline.
 

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Índice

Mersenne and Galileo
3
VII
7
Resonance and Musical Instruments
10
2
25
3
47
Experimental Approaches in the Neurobiology of Music
60
Harmony Consonance
67
Rhythm Temporal Coding
75
BURNs
215
Natural Intervals and Scales
240
8
265
Stability of the Interval Standard
280
Colored Hearing
286
9
299
Larger Scale Groupings
313
EqualInterval Tone Complexes
336

Acknowledgments
82
4
89
Perceptual Attributes of Simultaneous Tones
102
Conclusion
108
ExPLoRATIon of TIMBRE BY ANALYsis AND SYNTHEsis JEANCLAUDE RisseT AND DAvid L WEssel I Timbre
113
The Classical View
114
The Shortcomings of the Classical Conception
116
Attack Transients
117
Importance of Characteristic Features
118
Percussion Instruments
124
CrossSynthesis and Voice Synthesis
126
Subtractive Synthesis
128
Global or Nonlinear Synthesis
130
Physical Modeling as a Synthesis Technique
131
Sampling
134
Musical Prosody Fusion and Segregation
135
AnalysisSynthesis as Fitting Physical and Perceptual Models to Data
138
The Use of AnalysisSynthesis Models of Timbre
141
Timbral Space
146
Conclusion
149
Appendices
151
References
158
THE PERCEPTION of SING ING Johan SundeeRG I Introduction
171
Function of the Voice
172
Resonatory Aspects
174
Phonation
188
Aspects of Voice Timbre
194
Vibrato
195
Pitch in Practice
203
Expression
207
Concluding Remarks
209
References
210
1
349
1
413
12
441
Problems with Level Displays
448
Style Structures as Composite Cognitive Paths
456
The Musical Reality of StyleStructural Hierarchies
464
13
472
Rhythm Perception
478
Rhythm Timing and Movement
494
THE PERFoRMANce of Music
501
SightReading
509
Motor Processes in Performance
516
Measurements of Performance
523
Models of Music Performance
550
Performance Evaluation
577
15
603
Summary
620
Rosamund SHuTERDYson
627
Music Ability and Other Abilities
643
NEUROLOGICAL AsRECTs of Music PERCEPTION
653
Progress in the Classification of Auditory Disorders
673
Progress in the Neuropsychology of Human Music Perception
699
Music Perception as a Skill
704
18
714
ComPARATIVE Music PERCEPTION AND Cog NITION
725
Pitch Systems
736
Tonality
743
Melody
751
Rhythm
758
Creativity Communication Meaning and Affect
765
INDEx
793
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