History of the captivity of Napoleon at St. Helena: from the letters and journals of the late Lieut.-Gen. Sir Hudson Lowe, and official documents not before made public, Volumen 2

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Página 208 - Yes ! where is he, the champion and the child Of all that's great or little, wise or wild ; Whose game was empires, and whose stakes were thrones ; Whose table earth — whose dice were human bones ? Behold the grand result in yon lone isle,5 And, as thy nature urges, weep or smile.
Página 357 - ... nature, and he will do so, as speedily as you shall give possibility to the means, by taking off the prohibition, laid upon the merchants of the island, of carrying on his correspondence, and releasing it from all kind of inquisition on your part or on that of any of your agents. The moment the Emperor's wants shall be known in Europe, the persons who interest themselves for him, will transmit the necessary funds for his supplies. " The letter of Lord Bathurst, which you have communicated to...
Página 4 - ... them have superior officers in the administration who watch over them. On this rock, the man who makes the most absurd regulations, executes them with violence, and transgresses all laws; there is nobody to check the outrages of his passions. " The Prince Regent can never be informed of the acts carried on under his name ; they have refused to forward my letters to him...
Página 3 - My dear Count de Las Cases, — My heart is deeply affected by what you now experience. Torn from me a fortnight ago, you have been ever since closely confined, without the possibility of my receiving any news from you, or sending you any ; without having had any communication with any person, either French or English ; deprived even of the attendance of a servant of your own choice. " Your conduct at St. Helena has been, like the whole of your life, honourable and irreproachable ; I have pleasure...
Página 337 - The fact was this : soon after his .arrival at St. Helena, he expressed a wish for some books to complete his library, and a list was made out by General Buonaparte himself, and transmitted to this country. This list was sent to an eminent French bookseller in this town, with orders to supply such of the books as he had, and to obtain the rest from other booksellers. As several of the books were not to be obtained in London, the bookseller was desired to write to Paris for them. He accordingly obtained...
Página 139 - ... only. It is my opinion that whatever is the custom of a nation and is practised by the first characters of that nation towards their chief, cannot degrade strangers who perform the same.
Página 5 - Your company was necessary to me. You are the only one that can read, speak, and understand English, How many nights you have watched over me during my illnesses! However, I advise you, and if necessary, I order you, to demand of the Governor of this country to send you to the Continent ; he cannot refuse, since he has no power over you, but by virtue of the act which you have voluntarily signed. It will be a great source of consolation to me to know that you are on your way to more favoured climes.
Página 5 - Governor of this country to send you to the Continent ; he cannot refuse, since he has no power over you, but by virtue of the act which you have voluntarily signed. It will be a great source of consolation to me to know that you are on your way to more favoured climes. " Once in Europe, whether you proceed to England or return home, endeavour to forget the evils which you have been made to suffer ; and boast of the fidelity which you have shewn towards me, and of all the affection I feel for you....
Página 339 - No instances had been given, no answer had been returned ; and the reason was this, that the assertion was absolutely false. Indeed, in the voluminous papers which had been transmitted from St. Helena, nothing was more painfully disgusting than the utter indifference to truth shown throughout.
Página 363 - Gate, and returning by Woody Ridge to Longwood, never having been frequented by General Bonaparte since the Governor's arrival, the post which observed it will for the greater part be withdrawn" ? &c. How does he reconcile it with his own declaration, — " and if no attempts were made to effect that escape, there would not be wanting some from false motives of compassion to reproach Mm for those restrictions which had probably prevented these attempts from being made"?

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