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The calm,—she bared her argent neck and swift

The bright steel winged its flashing way.

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I woke : the moon was smiling through a rift

Above my head, and slow Among the whispering leaves the night wind crept:

The netted silver quivered o'er the lawn, And in a fairy dreamland Nature slept,

To wake again at dawn.

FROM ROBERTSON'S CHARLES V.

Latin Prose

BY

W A L T E R LOCK .

ROBERTSON'S CHARLES V.

Book. vi.

These being accordingly met, and all the foreign ambassadors invited to attend, the emperor stood up, and addressing himself to the pope, expatiated for some time on the sincerity of his own wishes for the peace of Christendom, as well as his abhorrence of war, the miseries of which he enumerated at great length, with studied and elaborate oratory ; he complained that all his endeavours to preserve the tranquillity of Europe had hitherto been defeated by the restless and unjust ambition of the French king, that even during his minority he had proofs of the unfriendly and hostile intentions of that monarch; that afterwards he had openly attempted to wrest from him the imperial crown which belonged to him by a title no less just than natural; that he had next invaded his kingdom of Navarre ; that not satisfied with this he had attacked his territories as well as those of his allies, both in Italy and the Low Countries; that, when the valour of the Imperial troops, rendered irresistible by the protection of the Almighty, had checked his progress, ruined his armies and seized his person, he continued to pursue by deceit what he had undertaken with injustice: that he had violated every article in the treaty of Madrid, to which he owed his

IDEM LATINE REDDITUM.

Non Teucros agat in Rutulos : Teucrum arma quiescant
Et Rutuli: nostro dirimamus sanguine bellum.

Æn. xii.

Qui ubi convenerant, legatique omnes in concilium vocati, princeps ad dicendum surrexit; appellatoque pontifice, diu et gravissimè disseruit quanto ipse studio pacem inter gentes Christianas exoptaret, quanto in odio bella haberet, quorum

calamitates luctuosissimas composità atque ornatissimâ commemoravit oratione.

Deinde queri omnibus quæ pacis apud gentes Europæas confirmandæ causâ fecisset, semper obstitisse regem illum Gallorum improbâ atque iniquissimâ gloriæ cupidine impulsum: se enim vel prætextatum regis illius mentem sibi inimicam atque infestam compertam habuisse; deinde eundem se principatu conditionibus perinde æquis ac legitimis sibi tradito, palam exuere conatum esse. Mox agro Vasconiensi bellum intulisse et suos sociorumque fines quâ in Italiâ, quâ in Belgicâ infesto exercitu ingressum esse; quum vero legionum consularium virtus, Deorum auspiciis ductuque, aggredienti obstitisset, fusisque copiis, ipsum in carcerem traxisset, vel tunc quæ iniqué suscepisset, fraude perpetrandis operam dedisse. omnes enim foederis Mantuensis, liberty, and as soon as he returned to his dominions, took measures for re-kindling the war which that pacification had happily extinguished; that when new misfortunes compelled him to sue again for peace at Cambray, he concluded and observed it with equal infidelity; that soon after he had formed dangerous connections with the heretical princes in Germany and incited them to disturb the tranquillity of the empire : that now he had driven the duke of Savoy, a prince married to a sister of the Empress and joined in close alliance with Spain, out of the greater part of his territories : and after injuries so often repeated, and amidst so many sources of discord, all hope of amity or concord became desperate: and though he was still willing to grant the investiture of Milan to one of the princes of France, there was little probability of that event taking place, as Francis, on the one hand, would not consent to what was necessary for securing the tranquillity of Europe, nor on the other could he think it reasonable or safe to give a rival the unconditional possession of all that he demanded. “Let us not however” added he "continue wantonly to shed the blood of our innocent subjects : let us decide the quarrel man to man, with what arms he pleases to choose, in our shirts, on an island, a bridge, or aboard a galley moored in a river: let the Duchy of Burgundy be put in deposit on his part, and that of Milan on mine; these shall be the prize of the conqueror; and after that let the united forces of Germany, Spain, and France be employed to humble the power of the Turk and to extirpate heresy out of Christendom. But if he, by declining this method of terminating our differences, renders war inevitable, nothing shall divert me from prosecuting it to such extremity, as shall reduce one of us to be the poorest gentleman in his own dominions. Nor do I fear that it will be on me this misfortune will fall : I enter upon action with the fairest prospect of success: the justice of my

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