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Roman Stew Pan found at Herculaneum

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LIST OF EMBELLISHMENTS TO THE VOLUME. Those marked * are Vignettes.

Roman Acerra in the Museum Disneianum

Triped Thuribulum, found at Pompeii

Roman Lamp for Ten Lights.

*Two Roman Hand Lamps

Frontispiece.

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View of High Peak Hill, near Sidmouth, Devon
Map of Sidmouth, Devon, and its neighbourhood
Corporate Seal of Huntingdon; armorial atchievements at Sawtrey; and two
Seals of Sir John Bussy

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Arms of Cropley and Payne, and Sepulchral Brasses of William Taylard and his wife in Dodington Church, co. Huntingdon .

Caricatures of the Catholic Family; the Mountebank; and a Nest of Foxes *A General in Distress (the Duke of Cumberland)

*An Owl (Dr. Samuel Johnson)

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Farmer George and his Wife; War (North, Fox, and Burke); and the Weird

Sisters (Dundas, Pitt, and Thurlow)

*Seals of John and Beatrix Waldeschef, and of John, Thomas, and Philip Deneys

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*Britannia Aroused

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*Prince of Wales, Lady Archer, and Lady Cecilia Johnson

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*Token of George Hall at Mother Redcap in Hockly Holet

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Ornaments, &c. discovered in Stand Lowe, and Cow Low, co. Derby

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Circular German Cards, Queen of Hares and Nine of Parroquets

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*Halfpenny Token of John Hart, Chandler, in Nottingham

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HAVING at the termination of last year more fully explained to. our readers all we deemed necessary as to the progress of our work, the materials which we have added, and the subjects of which we have treated, we have at the present time little more to say but that we are convinced that the best and surest way to maintain our reputation, and even to increase our usefulness, will be, as we have previously done, to resist the attraction of merely temporary topics, which seldom survive the rapid changes of opinion and feeling from which they arise; and to avoid as much as possible those party and personal interests which are too often formed on narrow views and mistaken judgments; and to confine our attention to more important points; so that our information should not be defective, and our reasonings and conclusions not inaccurate. The main branches of information in our Magazine may be considered as threefold,-viz. Literature, Antiquities, and Biography. In the first we rather aim at giving an impartial account of the merits and defects of the work reviewed, and an accurate exposition of its materials, than to make the text of the author a vehicle for theoretical opinions and ingenious suggestions of our own. As to the second branch, we must allow that, of late, we have had to meet some rival publications of much merit and deserved reputation, which, being exclusively devoted to their single and separate branch of learning and science, have been able to surpass us in the quantity, if not in the value, of their contributions. We however are glad to say that, notwithstanding the attraction which these new publications possess, we can still boast of the undiminished attachment of our old friends; nor have we felt any decrease in the number of useful and valuable documents submitted to our care. Our Obituary, which closes our series, is formed on careful observation and industrious inquiry. We seek those sources where 229972

we are least likely to be misled; we make due allowance for diversity of opinion, and we steer as clear as we can of the bias of personal interests, and the heat and animosity of party feeling. We do not seek for what present impressions may find most attractive, but what future inquiry may pronounce most true; and we keep in mind what Bishop Burnet said,-that he always looked to truth, "which became an impartial writer of history, as one who believes that he must give an account no less of what he writes than of what he does or says."

S. URBAN.

1849.

E PLURIMUS UNUM.

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