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Original Anecdotes, Literary News, Chit Chat, Incidents, &c.

SIR THOMAS MORE.

Tales of the Crusaders, by the author of Waverley, are announced as In making lately some necessary preparing for publication.

repairs in St. Dunstan's church, CanMilitary CONTROL.-Charles XII. terbury, a box was found, containing on being thwarted by the Senate, trans- the head of the great Lord Chancelmitted a letter to Stockholm, in which lor More, who was condemned to the he threatened to send his jack-boot block by that ruthless king, Henry to preside over their deliberations !" the VIIIth, for refusing to take the WONDERS FOR History.--Bona

oath of supremacy to the self-willed

monarch. The head, with the excepparte, sovereign of Europe, was a lieutenant in the Artillery when M. Mini- tion of a few of the teeth, was much bus, one of the French masters of the decayed ; and the sacred remains Royal Military College at Marlow, was place. Sir Thomas was beheaded on

have been restored to their restingcaptain.

the 6th of July, 1625, in the 53d year The son of Joseph Bonaparte, for- of his age ; after the execution, tho? merly an attorney at Bayonne, was con- the body was buried in the church of verted by the magic of Bonaparte into St. Peter, in the Tower, and aftera sceptre, which, after ruling Naples, wards in Chelsea church, where it commanded Spain.

now lies, yet his head was set on a Short Commons.- At a shop win- pole upon London Bridge ; and was dow in the Strand, there appears the afterwards privately bought by his following notice : “ Wanted two ap- daughter Margaret, wife of J. Roper, prentices, who shall be treated as one esq. His daughter preserved the head of the family."!!

in a box, with much devotion, and Artificial Incubation.- Paris as well placed it in a vault, partly in the wall as London has its exhibition of this on the south side of the church, where kind. “Would you (says a writer in it was recently discovered, and very one of the French journals,) without near to her own tomb. The south a tedious journey have the opportuni- chancel of the church is called the ty of contemplating one of the won. Roper chancel; and there hung the ders of Egypt ? Go to the Champs- helmet and surcoat, with the arms of Elysées, and there, at No. 37 in the Sir T. More on it. Widow's Walk, you will see, by means

Man is MAN.--The rose hath its of artificial incubation, chickens hatch- thorns—the diamond its specks-and ed before your eyes, without hens the best man his failings. having any thing to do with the affair. He who triumphs over a woman, The theory of this art, equally valua- would over a man-if he durst. He ble to science and to gluttony, had only proves by doing so that he is both been taught in several works, but the a fool and a coward. practice of it was but little advanced, TiTLES OF SOVEREIGNS.until after four years of application M. of Monomotapa is surrounded by musiBorne at length obtained this triumph cians and poets, who call him Lord of over the kingdom of Pharaoh. His the Sun and Moon ; Great Magician, incubating ovens have excited the in- and Great Thief ! terest of our learned men, the curios The King of Araccan is called “Emity of our fashionables, and the appe- peror of Araccan, Possessor of the tite of our epicures, who have been White Elephants and the Two Earanxious to ascertain by their own ex- rings, Legitimate Heir of Pegul and perience the flavour of these offspring Brama, Lord of the Twelve Provinces of art. It is said that all kinds of of Bengal, and the Twelve Kings who poultry may be hatched in M Borne's place their heads under his feet.” ovens. Without speaking of the rest, The King of Ava is called God. pothing can be more evident than that when he writes to a foreign Sovereign, the race of geese are rapidly multi- he calls himself the King of Kings, plying already."

whom all others should obey, as he is

- The King

absolute master of the ebb and flow of M. -- “ What a difference! IfI the sea, brother to the sun, and King did borrow money of M. -- it was of the four and twenty umbrellas : only because he is your papa's intimate These umbrellas are always carried friend, and to whom under such circumbefore him.

stances, should one bave recourse but The Kandyan Sovereign is called to one's friend :” • In one word, Dewo, (God.) In a deed of gist, he Mamma, in order to satisfy you, I see proclainis himself the protector of reli- that I must follow the advice which the gion, whose fame is infinite and of sur- doctor gave to papa-Do as I say, passing excellence, exceeding the moon, and not as I do." ihe unexpanded jessamin buds, the

A person in Paris lately established stars, &c., whose feet are as fragrant to

a bureau, where those who have no the noses of other Kings as flowers to money may risk their coat, waistcoat, bees; our most noble patron and god and even small clothes; the prizes are by custom, &c.

paid in the same articles. We are as[FROM THE FRENCH.]

sured that a poor wretch who had

risked his last pair of inexpressibles Dialogue between a Mother and her upon a quarterne (four numbers, had Daughter.

a turn of fortune, and became entitled Sophy, I will not let you run about to receive 75,000 pairs of breeches! the garden in that manner, without A GLORIOUS ?EVENGE.- If you feel your bonnet, with M. Ernest.” • But, inclined to exercise your vengeance aMamma, you have been walking arm gainst one that has deeply injured you, in arm, in the same way with M. . take the first opportunity of doing him “What a comparison; I am old enough a service. If he has any feeling, you to know what I am about. Sophy, it will wound him to the quick. M. Ernest should ask you at the ball MATTER.--Berkeley, bishop of this evening to waltz with him, I forbid Cloyne, is the last who, by a bundred your doing so.”_- Why, Mamma ? captious sophisms, has pretended to Last Sunday you waltzed twice with prove that bodies do not exist. They M. Oh, that's quite another have, says he, neither colour, nor smell

, thing. Besides, M. is your papa's nor heat ; all these modalities are in intimate friend ; and when you are your sensations, and not in the objects. married you may waltz with your hus- He might have spared himself the band's intimate friend.- Sophy, I do trouble of proving this truth, for it was not like your swinging with Al. Ernest; already sufficiently known. But from it is not a proper exercise for a young thence he passes to extent and solidity, lady.” . But, Mamma, this morning which are essential to body ; and you passed half an hour in the see-saw, thinks he proves that there is no eswith M.---' 6 How different ! tent in a piece of green cloth, because Sophy, I desire that this afternoon you the truth is, it is not in reality green, will not seat yourself in the drawing- the sensation of green being in our. room by M. Ernest.” “Mamma, I do selves only. Having thus destroyed not seat myself by him, he seats him- extent, he concludes that solidity, which self by me. Besides, I assure you he is attached to it, falls of itself; and does it only to be near you, and in therefore that there is nothing in the every thing to imitate M. - who world but our ideas. So that, accordnever quits your side.' “ Sophy, when ing to this doctrine, ten thousand men we have company, I will not allow you killed by ten thousand cannon-shots, to be constantly playing at cards. are in reality nothing more than ten Gaming is an amusement very unsuita- thousand apprehensions of our un ble to a young female.” But, Mam derstanding; Surely the bishop of ma, you set me the example. Recol- Cloyne might have saved himself lect that only yesterday, having lost all from falling into this excessive absurdithe money in your purse at Ecarté, the cause of the preservation of all aniyou were obliged to borrow some of mals, the regulator of the seasons, the

M. BONPLAND.

ty. He might very easily see that ex- coniplete at that place the making of a tent and solidity were quite different great road, at the same time that he from sound, colour, taste, smell, &c. It will pursue his botanical researches. is quite clear that these are sensations His friends flatter themselves that the excited in us by the configuration of steps taken by the French Government, parts ; but extent is not sensation. those of the Institute, and of M. Von When this lighted coal goes out, I am Humboldt, will not be unsuccessful. no longer warm; when the air is no General Bolivar has also written a letlonger struck, I cease to hear ; when ter to the supreme director of Paraguay, this rose withers, I no longer smell it : in which he claims our countryman in but the coal, the air, and the rose, have the most affectionate terms, as the extent without me. Berkeley's paradox friend of his youth. If M. Bonpland is is not worth repeating.

so fortunate as to return to Europe, he

may throw great light on countries (Extract from a private letter.) hitherto unknown.”

Rio Janeiro, April 9.--" During An Upstart.--The most biting my stay in this country I have obtained mortification you can inflict upon an pretty circumstantial information res- upstart is, to take no notice of him. pecting the events in Paraguay, where Singular Occurrence.-On Saturday, as a Dr. Franzia still governs. The follow- gentleman was sitting under the chancel of ing appear to me to be the most au the abbey of Linchden he perceived a hawk thentic particulars relating to the fate of making the woods reecho with its melodious

pursuing a lark, which a little before was M. Bonpland, which has excited so

notes. In order to save the little fugitive, much interest in France and Englarad, he shouted and clapped his hands, when and wherever this courageous and in- immediately the lark descended, and alighttelligent traveller is known :-About ed on his knee, nor did it offer to leave him

when taken into the hand, but seemed contwo years and a half ago, M. Bonpland fident of that protection which it had sought. was at Santa Anna on the east bank of The gentleman brought it in his hat to the Rio Parana, where he had formed Dumfries; and, on going into his garden, plantations of the matté, or the tea of gave the little warbler liberty.

An old lady in Dumfries, of the age of Paraguay. About eleven o'clock in the

86, who had lost all her teeth several years, morning he was seized and carried off ago, has, to the astonishment of her friends, by a detachment of eight hundred of cut six new teeth within these few months, Dr. Franzia's troops. They destroyed and, as may be supposed, enjoys no small the plantations, which were in a most satisfaction in being once more able to bite

a crust. But there is an old gentleman flourishing state, and seized M. Bon- living not many doors from her, upwards of pland, and the Indian families whom 97 years of age, who has not lost one of his the mildness of his character and the teeth, and is able to crack the hardest seaadvantages of the rising civilization had biscuit. What is still more remarkable, he

can read and write without the aid of specengaged to settle near him. Some In

tacles. dians escaped by swimming, others, who resisted, were massacred by the soldiers. M. Bonpland taking on his The Printing Apparatus invented by Mr. shoulders a part of his precious collec- Church," of the Britannia Works, Birmingtion of natural history, was conducted ham, forins perhaps the most extraordinary to Assomption, the capital of Paraguay, long time been submitted to the public

. It

combination of machinery that has for a and sept from thence to a port in quali- consists of three pieces of mechanism. The ty of physician to the garrison. It is first of these has for its object the casting of not known how long he remained in metallic types with extraordinary expedithis exi le; but I am assured that he tion and the arrangement of them for the has since been sent for by Dr. Franzia, er is made to displace à certain portion of

compositor. By turning a handle, a plung. the supreme director of Paraguay, and duid metal, which rushes with considerable ordered

to another part, to superintend force, through small apertures, into the a commercial communication between moulds and matrices by which the types

The farther progress of the maParaguay and Peru, perhaps towards chine discharges the types from the moulds, the province of the Chiquitos and Santa and causes them to descend into square Cruz de la Sierra. M. Bonpland is to

Mr. Church is an inhabitant of Boston.

.

NEWLY INVENTED PRINTING MA

CHINERY.

are cast.

fc

tubes, having the shape of the types, and

NEW WORKS. down which they slide. It then brings the A Sermon on the Death of Lord Byron, body of each type into the position required by a Layman, 8vo.—Dibdin's Libraryćom. for placing it in the composing machine; panion, 8vo. 278.—Elgiva, or the Monks, a and when the types have descended in the Poem, Svo. 88.-Malcolm's Poems, f. cap. guides, they are pushed back by the ma 8vo. 68.-Wentworth's Poetical Note-Book, chine into ranges, each type preserving its 12mo. 78.--Conversations on Poetry, 18mo. erect position. The machine then returus

28.—Homeri Ilias Heynii, 8vo. 12s.- The into its former state, and the same operation Licensed Victualler's Companion, 18mo 4s. is renewed. The construction of the mould- – Village Doctor, or Family-Vade Mecum, bar is the most striking portion of the ma 3s. 6d. Hewsou on Venereal Opthalmia. chine.

Conchologist's Companion, 12mo 68.–StuThe second machine selects and combines

art on the Steam-Engine, 8vo 8s.-Curtis the types into words and sentences. The

on British Grasscs, 8vo. 98.-Gray's Book several sorts of types are arranged in nar

of Roads, square 12mo. 78.; Ditto ditto, row boxes or slips, each individual slip con

with Atlas, 12s.-El Nuevo Connelly, or taining a great number of types of the same Graminar for Spaniards to learn English, letter, which is called a file of letters. The 12mo. 68.-Ventouillac's French Classics, cases containing the files are placed in the Parts VII. and VIII. (Paul and Virginia, upper part of the composing machine; and &c.) 68.- Donville's Fiench Grammar, 2 by means of keys like those of a piano-forte, vols. 8vo. 188.–Lowndes on Legacies, royal the compositor can release from any file the

8vo. 245.- Mirehouse on Advowsons, 8vo. type which he wants. The type thus liber. 148.-Hayes on Devises, 8vo. 145.-Orine's ated is led by collecting arms into a curved Bibliotheca Biblica, 8vo. 128. channel, which aoswers the purpose of a composing stick. From this channel they

Lasting Impressions, a Novel. By Mrs. may be taken in words or sentences, and Joanna Carey. formed by the hand into pages, by means Commentaries on the Diseases of the of a box placed at the side of the machine. Stomach and Bowels of Children. By Rob

The third machine, for taking off impres. ert Duglison, M.D. &c.&c. sions from the types, evinces much ingenu.

The papers printed in the Transactions ity ; but cannot be understood without sev.

of the Royal Society during the last three eral drawings.

years, detailing the Discoveries of the After the types have been used, and the functions of the Nerves, will be immediaterequisite number or impressions obtained, ly republished with Notes and a general lothey are remelted and recast as before, so troductory View of the Nervous System, that every sheet is printed with new types. by Charles Bell, Professor of Anatomy

IN THE PRESS.

[blocks in formation]

OF THE

ENGLISH MAGAZINES.

NO. 3.)

BOSTON, NOV. 1, 1824.

[vol. 2. N.s.

SETORES OF SOCIETY.
(London Literary Gazette, August.)

EFFRONTERY.
I HAVE often wondered how Jack many a one say of him, after

a first in L-, the attorney, got on in the terview, I believe Jack is a good-natured world ; for, to me, his character does fellow at bottom. He was once emnot appear to possess one redeeming ployed in a suit against his own father; quality. Every body calls him a liar, and so unblushingly did he talk of the a cheat, a rascal ; yet every body as- matter, that it did

not lose him a single sociates with him : he is welcomed acquaintance or friend. even at the houses of the fastidious, Though Jack began the world penand his parties are always filled at nyless, he is now a rich man. Those home; business pours in upon him who were cheated by him last yearfrom all quarters ; and, lastly, he has though they abuse him, to be surestill married a woman of high reputation seem willing to be cheated on, and and respectability. Surely there must Jack proceeds in his career as boldly be something very fascinating in his as ever. manners and address he must, at least, This character, I am afraid, is not be a complete gentleman. No: his an uncommon one ; at least, innumeraperson

is any thing but prepossessing; ble varieties of it are to be met in our his manners are disgustingly familiar intercourse with society. and boisterous ; and his conversation Throughout life, it has been a subabounds in slang and profaneness. ject of surprise to me, how those bold How, then, does he get on? Why is spirits succeed in obtaining their purnot every door shut against him? poses, even with each other. It cor

Effrontery-Effrontery is the talis- roborates the justice of Hudibras's obman to which he owes his success; it servationis the “ Open Sesamé,” which admits “That the pleasure is as great him into good society. If he in any

In being cheated, as to cheat." way appeared to condemn or to be In fact, people in general seem ever ashamed of himself, he would be shun- ready to be imposed on by those who ned like a common swindler ; but he possess dauntless effrontery. I knew puts a bold face on all his actions : he an instance, not long ago, of a man talks so openly of drinking, gambling, who was absolutely concerned in deand cheating, that he seems to take as frauding another of ten thousand pounds; much pains to convince the world that yet, so boldly did he maintain his own he is an adept in all three, as any other character, and utter self-evident false man ever took to conceal his vices. hood upon falsehood, that his very vir

He catches strangers completely by tim (a man by no means d: surprise ; they know not what to make common sense,) was, th of him: in fact, he manages his part year, not only ready to ent so well, that while he is in reality play- engagements with him, b ing off his true character, he appears one occasion, accommodate only to be acting; and I have heard letters of recommendation to 1

12 ATHENEUM VOL. 2. 2d series. nent.

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